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Pressure regulators for airbrushing


Louie B. Hydrick
 

 
 
Greetings,

Suggest you try Harbor Freight, they had several regulators in the lower ranges to choose from, they also do web order.

Louie B. Hydrick
Associate Broker
RE/MAX Partners
4316 Washington Road
Evans GA 30809-3957

706-832-6263 Mobile
706-922-7355 Office
706-922-7356 Fax
706-922-7368 Direct

GA Lic. 207874 SC Lic. 14865

Or visit me on the web at:
www.csrahomesandland.com
or
www.louiebhydrick.remax-georgia.com


Charles Peck
 

Different people have different priorities.  Personally I would not want to risk putting 3000 PSI on the cheapest possible product. 
Chuck Peck in FL

On Tue, Apr 25, 2017 at 9:33 AM, land46lord@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

 
 
Greetings,

Suggest you try Harbor Freight, they had several regulators in the lower ranges to choose from, they also do web order.

Louie B. Hydrick
​ 



Benjamin Hom
 

Chuck Peck wrote:
"Personally I would not want to risk putting 3000 PSI on the cheapest possible product."

You must have some serious premature drying issues if you're using 3000 psi HP air. Plus it must beat up the models pretty bad. [/sarcasm]


Ben Hom


Bruce Smith
 

Ben,

While Chuck may have overstated the pressure by about 3 fold, the internal pressure of the tank and therefore the pressure seen on the high pressure side of the regulator is about 800-1100 psi… So his point about buying cheap equipment is well made.  In addition, those cheaper regulators are more likely to blow out their diaphragms, which, if it happens while connected to an airbrush could indeed make a serious mess out of a steam era freight car!

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Apr 25, 2017, at 9:13 AM, Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Chuck Peck wrote:
"Personally I would not want to risk putting 3000 PSI on the cheapest possible product."

You must have some serious premature drying issues if you're using 3000 psi HP air.  Plus it must beat up the models pretty bad.  [/sarcasm]


Ben Hom


Tim O'Connor
 


lol - yeah I'd guess that 3000 psi is well beyond the "crush strength" of
the average HO scale model. assuming you could even hold onto the airbrush,
hoping it didn't impale itself in your chest...

Tim O'


Chuck Peck wrote:
"Personally I would not want to risk putting 3000 PSI on the cheapest possible product."

You must have some serious premature drying issues if you're using 3000 psi HP air.  Plus it must beat up the models pretty bad.  [/sarcasm]

Ben Hom


Charles Peck
 

If my original post had been read fully, including the post I quoted, one might have noticed
that I was referring to the use of a Harbor Freight regulator on the full tank pressure.
No where did I suggest that 3000 PSI should be used in an air brush. 
When I am risking my personal safety around highly compressed gasses, I want equipment
that is worthy of trust, not the "El Cheapo" brand.  But I suppose some folks do not see
a risk factor in high pressures.
Chuck Peck in FL 

On Tue, Apr 25, 2017 at 1:07 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 


lol - yeah I'd guess that 3000 psi is well beyond the "crush strength" of
the average HO scale model. assuming you could even hold onto the airbrush,
hoping it didn't impale itself in your chest...

Tim O'


Chuck Peck wrote:
"Personally I would not want to risk putting 3000 PSI on the cheapest possible product."

You must have some serious premature drying issues if you're using 3000 psi HP air.  Plus it must beat up the models pretty bad.  [/sarcasm]

Ben Hom



Dennis Storzek
 

I'm also wondering where the 3000 PSI came from. Doing a little research on what threads are used for CO2, I find that carbon dioxide goes liquid in the tank, and that limits the pressure to around 850 PSI at room temperature. If the gauge on the regulator really goes to 3000, it may be a nitrogen regulator. If the GAUGE READS 3000 PSI, it's either screwed up, or you have a bottle of some other gas... I hope not oxygen.

Best to take the tank into a gas distributor, and let them determine what it is, and fit it with a suitable regulator and gauge.

Dennis Storzek