Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago


thecitrusbelt@...
 

Photo taken in Monroeton, Bradford County, PA, in 1917. This is from Joyce M. Tice's Tri-Counties Genealogy & History website.

 

https://www.joycetice.com/trains/monro02.jpg

 

There are many, many old railroad photos on the website at:

 

https://www.joycetice.com/trains/

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Nolan Hinshaw
 

From: "thecitrusbelt@yahoo.com [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2017 5:31 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

[photo link elided]

That tickled a minor obsession of mine -- I have several connections with the city of Petaluma California, once known as the egg basket of the US and the topic of the film _The Egg and I_. Petaluma chickens ate feed containing ground oyster shells from which they extracted calcium which they subsequently deposited in their shells, which allowed the eggs to travel by rail to the rest of the country. In about 1915 Petaluma shipped over 143 million chicken eggs to the rest of the US by rail! The connection was mostly via the Petaluma & Santa Rosa and the Espee.

See <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petaluma,_California>
and note in particular the reference to the scow schooner Alma, currently a national historic landmark sailing out of the only floating national park in the US, San Francisco maritime National Historical Park <http:www.nps.gov/safr/> -- this is my main connection to Petaluma, as we sail it there for a three night stay every October.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, San Francisco
"Not only is it not right, it's not even wrong!"
From Wolfgang Pauli, perpetrator of the Pauli Exclusion Principle


Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

We might be getting off topic here, but Alma is the last of the scow-schooners which once carried freight all around San Francisco Bay and the estuaries. These boats had squared-off prows and a very shallow draft.

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff

On 5/23/17 2:33 PM, Nolan Hinshaw cearnog@... [STMFC] wrote:
 


From: "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2017 5:31 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

[photo link elided]

That tickled a minor obsession of mine -- I have several connections with the city of Petaluma California, once known as the egg basket of the US and the topic of the film _The Egg and I_. Petaluma chickens ate feed containing ground oyster shells from which they extracted calcium which they subsequently deposited in their shells, which allowed the eggs to travel by rail to the rest of the country. In about 1915 Petaluma shipped over 143 million chicken eggs to the rest of the US by rail! The connection was mostly via the Petaluma & Santa Rosa and the Espee.

See
and note in particular the reference to the scow schooner Alma, currently a national historic landmark sailing out of the only floating national park in the US, San Francisco maritime National Historical Park -- this is my main connection to Petaluma, as we sail it there for a three night stay every October.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, San Francisco
"Not only is it not right, it's not even wrong!"
>From Wolfgang Pauli, perpetrator of the Pauli Exclusion Principle



Eric Bergh
 

FYI, HABS has Scale Drawings and lots of photos of the Alma on their website here; Open in new window.

The SF Maritime National Historic Park is a must-see stop if you ever are in San Francisco! Dedicated staff and volunteers have preserved some truly exceptional vessels. 

My Dad was a Docent and volunteer there in the Small Boat shop for many years...
-Eric


Jerry Michels
 

Nolan, Petaluma still has a Butter and Eggs Festival.  Jerry Michels


Brian Termunde
 

Thanks for this tidbit Nolan!

It helps me in several ways. First, I model Raymond / South Bend, Washington State, the Oyster Capital of the world! [And who am I to argue with the local boosters? ] So now instead of just shipping oysters, I can ship oyster shells. Plus, being that I also love the NWP, now I can 'justify' having NWP box cars on my line. They're there to ship shells to Petaluma!

And I enjoyed the movie "The Egg and I" as well. In fact, the actual location where the events that Betty MacDonald (e i e i o?) related took place is not too far north of Willapa Harbor (about 2 hours). I was actually near there just before my ship headed out to the Persian Gulf, but was unaware of it. Dang!

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah


******************************************************************************

________________________________________________________________________
3a. Re: Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago
Posted by: "Nolan Hinshaw" cearnog@... gatepigeon
Date: Tue May 23, 2017 1:33 pm ((PDT))


From: "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2017 5:31 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

[photo link elided]

That tickled a minor obsession of mine -- I have several connections with the city of Petaluma California, once known as the egg basket of the US and the topic of the film _The Egg and I_. Petaluma chickens ate feed containing ground oyster shells from which they extracted calcium which they subsequently deposited in their shells, which allowed the eggs to travel by rail to the rest of the country. In about 1915 Petaluma shipped over 143 million chicken eggs to the rest of the US by rail! The connection was mostly via the Petaluma & Santa Rosa and the Espee.

See <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petaluma,_California


Brad Andonian
 

Brian,

Perhaps you can add winlock, wa?   Home of the world largest egg and at one time a large poultry raising area.....  winlock is south of Raymond in Lewis county.

I would like to hear more about your layout.

Brad Andonian
Due north in Seattle 


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Tuesday, May 23, 2017, 6:57 PM, Brian Termunde GCRDS@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for this tidbit Nolan!

It helps me in several ways. First, I model Raymond / South Bend, Washington State, the Oyster Capital of the world! [And who am I to argue with the local boosters? ] So now instead of just shipping oysters, I can ship oyster shells. Plus, being that I also love the NWP, now I can 'justify' having NWP box cars on my line. They're there to ship shells to Petaluma!

And I enjoyed the movie "The Egg and I" as well. In fact, the actual location where the events that Betty MacDonald (e i e i o?) related took place is not too far north of Willapa Harbor (about 2 hours). I was actually near there just before my ship headed out to the Persian Gulf, but was unaware of it. Dang!

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah


******************************************************************************

________________________________________________________________________
3a. Re: Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago
Posted by: "Nolan Hinshaw" cearnog@... gatepigeon
Date: Tue May 23, 2017 1:33 pm ((PDT))


From: "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2017 5:31 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

[photo link elided]

That tickled a minor obsession of mine -- I have several connections with the city of Petaluma California, once known as the egg basket of the US and the topic of the film _The Egg and I_. Petaluma chickens ate feed containing ground oyster shells from which they extracted calcium which they subsequently deposited in their shells, which allowed the eggs to travel by rail to the rest of the country. In about 1915 Petaluma shipped over 143 million chicken eggs to the rest of the US by rail! The connection was mostly via the Petaluma & Santa Rosa and the Espee.

See <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petaluma,_California


Nolan Hinshaw
 

From: "Garth Groff sarahsan@embarqmail.com [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 3:38 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago


Friends,>We might be getting off topic here, but Alma is the last of the scow-schooners which once carried freight >all around San Francisco Bay and the estuaries. These boats had squared-off prows and a very shallow draft.
Yours Aye,
Garth Groff
Egg production is an industry which relies on several sources of substances to feed the chickens which
produce the eggs and other substances for the safe shipment of the eggs, as well as various means to
transport the substances to the chickens and the eggs to the businesses which sell them. Oyster shell
appears to be one of the best dietary sources of calcium; ground up into chicken feed, the chickens can
extract it and make egg shells capable of withstanding transport over long distances; this is what allowed
the city of Petaluma to achieve its top rank in US egg production and shipment.

I've been noodling with the idea of modeling this end of the industry and featuring a scow or two
at the mill which ground the shell and some drays serving the farms and the traffic in and out of
Petaluma by rail as a sort of working diorama set to the period when the scows were transitioning from
sail to internal combustion.

--
Nolan Hinshaw, San Francisco
"Not only is it not right, it's not even wrong!"
From Wolfgang Pauli, perpetrator of the Pauli Exclusion Principle