S330 or S280 shot blasting media (Liquid Gravity)


thecitrusbelt@...
 

Part of an on-line review stated, "I am not sure what metal is used for the tiny little "BBs", but it is not magnetic and after a few measurements I came up with a density of about 4.15 gr/cm3 (lead has a density of 11.3 gr/cm3 for comparison)."


Disappointing that this product provides less weight than an equal volume of lead.


Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Bruce Smith
 

​Well, I guess that rules out depleted uranium ;)


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
Sent: Tuesday, June 6, 2017 1:49 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] S330 or S280 shot blasting media (Liquid Gravity)
 


Part of an on-line review stated, "I am not sure what metal is used for the tiny little "BBs", but it is not magnetic and after a few measurements I came up with a density of about 4.15 gr/cm3 (lead has a density of 11.3 gr/cm3 for comparison)."


Disappointing that this product provides less weight than an equal volume of lead.


Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA




Andy Carlson
 

"Shot blasting media" suggests to me that these miniature balls are for shot peening, an industrial process which smooths over minute surface "risers" on steel parts, such as crankshafts and connecting rods. Much like we notch a corner of a potato chip bag to start the tear to open the bag, stress risers are micro raised areas of a machined or forged surface where cracks can start and propagate to destruction. Metal media stuff is propelled at a very high velocity and has to be metal particles to achieve the desired results.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



From: "'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC]"
To: "STMFC@..."
Sent: Tuesday, June 6, 2017 4:28 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] S330 or S280 shot blasting media (Liquid Gravity)

 
​Well, I guess that rules out depleted uranium ;)

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 6, 2017 1:49 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] S330 or S280 shot blasting media (Liquid Gravity)
 


Part of an on-line review stated, "I am not sure what metal is used for the tiny little "BBs", but it is not magnetic and after a few measurements I came up with a density of about 4.15 gr/cm3 (lead has a density of 11.3 gr/cm3 for comparison)."

Disappointing that this product provides less weight than an equal volume of lead.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA





Tony Thompson
 

Part of an on-line review stated, "I am not sure what metal is used for the tiny little "BBs", but it is not magnetic and after a few measurements I came up with a density of about 4.15 gr/cm3 (lead has a density of 11.3 gr/cm3 for comparison)."


      Something is amiss here. Steel's density is 8.05 g/cm3. Even if the person "measuring" the density included the air, they should have gotten about 2/3 of the full density, or more than 5 g/cm3. A number like 4.15 is closer to titanium, and I seriously doubt the little balls are titanium.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <tony@...> wrote :
Something is amiss here. Steel's density is 8.05 g/cm3. Even if the person "measuring" the density included the air, they should have gotten about 2/3 of the full density, or more than 5 g/cm3. A number like 4.15 is closer to titanium, and I seriously doubt the little balls are titanium.

Tony Thompson    
===================

Well, the reviewer did say it's nonmagnetic, so it's not steel. For the price they want for it, it may as well be gold, but that would be heavier, too.

Dennis Storzek



Tim O'Connor
 

not tungsten ?

Well, the reviewer did say it's nonmagnetic, so it's not steel. For the price they want for it, it may as well be gold, but that would be heavier, too.

Dennis Storzek


Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

 

not tungsten ?


      If the actual density is even REMOTELY like the 4.15 g/cm3 claimed in the review, it sure ain't tungsten. You could look it up.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Dave Parker
 

Assuming the reviewer measured the bulk density correctly (hmmm...), and assuming the beads were at least approaching closed pack density, the the density of the mystery metal was in ballpark of 5.6 g/cm3.

There are no obvious candidates among earth-bound metals, which makes me doubt the first assumption.  Overpriced steel is still the best guess.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


On Tuesday, June 6, 2017 12:45 PM, "Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Tim O'Connor wrote:

 
not tungsten ?

      If the actual density is even REMOTELY like the 4.15 g/cm3 claimed in the review, it sure ain't tungsten. You could look it up.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history








Dennis Storzek
 

If he didn't do it via water displacement, all bets are off.

Just fror grins I went to mcmaster.com to see what they have for lead...

Lead shot, .080" dia, wish it was smaller: 
about $38 for five pounds.

lead wool:
about $34 for five pounds

lead sheet:
6X6 and 12X12 sheets available, various thicknesses.

No reason to look any further. Don't lick your fingers before washing.

Dennis Storzek




Michael Gross
 

This seems to make a great deal of sense, Dennis.  Lead, handled safely, should cause few problems, finger-lickers being the exception.


Tom Vanwormer
 

Folks,
I have been using jp's Brown Nymphing Mud "Soft Tungsten Weight available at Cabelas Outdoor Centers for weight.  It is moldable and great to work with on open cars.

Tom VanWormer
Monument CO

Michael Gross ActorMichaelGross@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

This seems to make a great deal of sense, Dennis.  Lead, handled safely, should cause few problems, finger-lickers being the exception.