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What Kind Of Car Is This?


thecitrusbelt@...
 

This photo is from the Barringer Library, probably pre-1940:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12293135473/in/dateposted/

 

Notice the freight car to the left. It appears to be a flat car with three vertical wooden tanks on it. But maybe it's something else?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Jeff Shultz <jeff@...>
 

Pickle car? Looks rather like the old Tyco car. 

On Jun 13, 2017 21:05, "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

This photo is from the Barringer Library, probably pre-1940:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12293135473/in/dateposted/

 

Notice the freight car to the left. It appears to be a flat car with three vertical wooden tanks on it. But maybe it's something else?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


John C. La Rue, Jr. <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

Lettering is not clear, but it could be a car with tubs to carry potable water for use in an extra gang outfit of camp cars. This type of water car used to be fairly common. Cars could have one, two, or three tubs. If only one or two, they were usually at the ends, where their weight when loaded was supported by the bolster and the truck under them.
 
John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Wed, Jun 14, 2017 12:05 am
Subject: [STMFC] What Kind Of Car Is This?

 
This photo is from the Barringer Library, probably pre-1940:
 
 
Notice the freight car to the left. It appears to be a flat car with three vertical wooden tanks on it. But maybe it's something else?
 
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Andy Carlson
 

Just a WAG...........but the Arrowhead Water Company had quite a fleet of water cars for hauling "Mountain Spring" Arrowhead water from up the mountains above San Bernardino to their bottling plant on Washington Ave in downtown L.A. The trip was usually 100% on P.E. RoW. Arguing against this guess would be the apparent lack of trolley overhead wires.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



From: "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 9:05 PM
Subject: [STMFC] What Kind Of Car Is This?

 
This photo is from the Barringer Library, probably pre-1940:
 
 
Notice the freight car to the left. It appears to be a flat car with three vertical wooden tanks on it. But maybe it's something else?
 
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA



Douglas Harding
 

The photo was taken in Fort Madison IA, between 1936-38 according to the captions under the photo. It looks an early oil tank car, but oil shipments had shifted to horizontal tanks long before the time of this photo. It could be a pickle or vinegar car, or as suggested a water car for work crews. Note it is coupled to an early tank car.

Doug Harding


tjcataldo
 

EARLY WINE CARS MAYBE

TOM CATALDO

On Tuesday, June 13, 2017, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

This photo is from the Barringer Library, probably pre-1940:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12293135473/in/dateposted/

 

Notice the freight car to the left. It appears to be a flat car with three vertical wooden tanks on it. But maybe it's something else?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



--
Thomas  j Cataldo


Tony Thompson
 

EARLY WINE CARS MAYBE


   Wine was extensively shipped in conventional tank cars as early as 1910. These wooden tubs seem to me most unlikely to be in use for that purpose.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






al_brown03
 

Florida East Coast shipped fresh water into the Keys, ca 1912, in cars that looked very much like this. See Bramson, "Speedway to Sunshine", p 90. (Later on, conventional tank cars were used: same page.)

The pickle cars I'm familiar with had frameworks around the pickle tubs. See Leider, "Pickle and Vinegar Makers of the Midwest", pp 51-73. In principle a stout enough tub mightn't need a frame, but I haven't seen one that way.

So, I'd guess this is a water car.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


John Moore
 

The flat car with the 3 wooden tubs is a Santa Fe water car.  Water cars of this type lasted into the 1930s and perhaps longer.  Water was hauled for company service - extra gangs - etc.  Metal tank cars eventually replaced the wood tub cars.

John B. Moore, Jr.
Albuquerque


thecitrusbelt@...
 

The notes for the photo say the photo was taken at Fort Madison, IA. The train supposedly is the Santa Fe's Navajo.


Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA