Hazmat Placards


D. Scott Chatfield
 

I think a UN committee came up with the numbers starting in 1975, but they didn't appear on freight cars until mid-1983.  That's when I saw my first one (1203, gasoline) on a company service trailer and asked "what's this?" Somebody higher up at the Southern decided that maybe a manager with my duties (overseeing proper handling and marking of hazmat in piggyback trailers, among other duties) might need to know about these newfangled UN codes.  And I was issued a copy of the federal Bureau Of Explosives tariff, which listed ALL of the codes.

That said, the Tichy sheet includes several generic color-coded hazmat placards that date back, I think, to the late '60s.  Still too late for this list.

I think Microscale makes a sheet that includes late Steam Era diamond-shaped placards, which were mostly white with a mix if red and black lettering.

Which brings up the question, when did the diamond-shaped placards first appear?  Union Tank had their distinctive square holders on all of their tanks by 1940, didn't they?  I made a couple sets from plastic strip and Plano frames not too long ago for some UTLX tanks I made for a friend, because no one can have too many black tank cars.....

Scott Chatfield


Dave Parker
 

Scott:

This is a good place to start on safety placards:



There are subsequent posts on modeling.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


On Thursday, June 15, 2017 12:23 PM, "blindog blindog@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
I think a UN committee came up with the numbers starting in 1975, but they didn't appear on freight cars until mid-1983.  That's when I saw my first one (1203, gasoline) on a company service trailer and asked "what's this?" Somebody higher up at the Southern decided that maybe a manager with my duties (overseeing proper handling and marking of hazmat in piggyback trailers, among other duties) might need to know about these newfangled UN codes.  And I was issued a copy of the federal Bureau Of Explosives tariff, which listed ALL of the codes.

That said, the Tichy sheet includes several generic color-coded hazmat placards that date back, I think, to the late '60s.  Still too late for this list.

I think Microscale makes a sheet that includes late Steam Era diamond-shaped placards, which were mostly white with a mix if red and black lettering.

Which brings up the question, when did the diamond-shaped placards first appear?  Union Tank had their distinctive square holders on all of their tanks by 1940, didn't they?  I made a couple sets from plastic strip and Plano frames not too long ago for some UTLX tanks I made for a friend, because no one can have too many black tank cars.....

Scott Chatfield



RICH CHAPIN
 

I have a copy of “Transportation of Explosives and Other Dangerous Articles by Freight including Specifications for Shipping Containers”, issued 12/11/1922, effective 1/1/1923. Required by a 3/4/1921 amendment to the Transportation Act of 1920. This is a ICC publication of regulations [actually labelled as “Freight Tariff No.1”.

 

Article 700 is “Labels” and shows required placards [classic diamonds]; red for inflammable liquids & gases, yellow for inflammable solids, white for acids & corrosives, white with red letters for poison gases and green for non-inflammable gases. These required on packaging.

 

Article 900 is required “Placarding of Cars”, but this has illustrations for explosives, poison gas, inflammable liquids and acids only. The last two are diamonds like the packaging, while the first two are rectangles.

 

So, 1/1/1923 is an official date for placards.  I note colors noted above are currently used [e.g., yellow flammable solid]

 

So, did the diamond come for the law requiring these regs? Or perhaps from a prior Bureau of Explosives document? I have found articles that say railroads required labels for Dangerous Goods in 1910, but have yet to find any specifics on that.

 

 

Rich Chapin

27 Quincy Rd

Basking Ridge, NJ 07920-2222

 


Dave Parker
 

Rich:

I have the same ICC publication as you.  It includes a diagram of the early (earliest) INFLAMMABLE placard:  that word in red, the rest in black, and on a diamond that is 10.75" on a side.  It also include the ACID diamond, but for some reason that was only 8.5" on a side.

For some reason, the ARA (MCB) started requiring the placard holders somewhat earlier.  The 1920 Specifications for Tank Cars included rule 18-A, but only for Class III and IV cars.  It specified "suitable boards for attaching placards prescribed by the Interstate Commerce Commission...of sufficient size to permit placards to be applied with the opposite points of the diamond in vertical and horizontal positions..." .  So the boards could be either square or in the diamond orientation, as long as they could accommodate the placards.  This reg predates the ICC rule by two or three years; perhaps the ARA knew it was in the pipeline. 

I can find no mention of these placards in the earlier MCB Specifications (1917, 1918).

Note that the metal-frame holders that allowed the standard placards to be dropped into place (rather than tacked) were mandated on newly built cars, and on  those receiving general repairs, with an effective date of Oct 14, 1932.  This is according to the 1938 Code of Federal Regulations.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


On Friday, June 16, 2017 3:53 AM, "'Richard W. Chapin' rwc27q@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
I have a copy of “Transportation of Explosives and Other Dangerous Articles by Freight including Specifications for Shipping Containers”, issued 12/11/1922, effective 1/1/1923. Required by a 3/4/1921 amendment to the Transportation Act of 1920. This is a ICC publication of regulations [actually labelled as “Freight Tariff No.1”.
 
Article 700 is “Labels” and shows required placards [classic diamonds]; red for inflammable liquids & gases, yellow for inflammable solids, white for acids & corrosives, white with red letters for poison gases and green for non-inflammable gases. These required on packaging.
 
Article 900 is required “Placarding of Cars”, but this has illustrations for explosives, poison gas, inflammable liquids and acids only. The last two are diamonds like the packaging, while the first two are rectangles.
 
So, 1/1/1923 is an official date for placards.  I note colors noted above are currently used [e.g., yellow flammable solid]
 
So, did the diamond come for the law requiring these regs? Or perhaps from a prior Bureau of Explosives document? I have found articles that say railroads required labels for Dangerous Goods in 1910, but have yet to find any specifics on that.
 
 
Rich Chapin
27 Quincy Rd
Basking Ridge, NJ 07920-2222
 



Tony Thompson
 

Rich Chapin wrote:

 
I have a copy of “Transportation of Explosives and Other Dangerous Articles by Freight including Specifications for Shipping Containers”, issued 12/11/1922, effective 1/1/1923. Required by a 3/4/1921 amendment to the Transportation Act of 1920. This is a ICC publication of regulations [actually labelled as “Freight Tariff No.1”.

Article 900 is required “Placarding of Cars”, but this has illustrations for explosives, poison gas, inflammable liquids and acids only. The last two are diamonds like the packaging, while the first two are rectangles.


      I wrote a blog post about all this back in 2012. My basis was a fine and authoritative article by John Ryczkowski, in Mainline Modeler (Volume 14, January 1993, pages 68–73), and I showed all the early and subsequent placards. Here is a link to that post:


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi everyone,

The document referenced can be found at

https://archive.org/details/regulationsfortr00unit

Placards are shown on pages 76-79

Claus Schlund

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dave Parker spottab@yahoo.com [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, June 16, 2017 7:15 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Hazmat Placards


Rich:
I have the same ICC publication as you. It includes a diagram of the early (earliest) INFLAMMABLE placard: that word in red, the rest in black, and on a diamond that is 10.75" on a side. It also include the ACID diamond, but for some reason that was only 8.5" on a side.
For some reason, the ARA (MCB) started requiring the placard holders somewhat earlier. The 1920 Specifications for Tank Cars included rule 18-A, but only for Class III and IV cars. It specified "suitable boards for attaching placards prescribed by the Interstate Commerce Commission...of sufficient size to permit placards to be applied with the opposite points of the diamond in vertical and horizontal positions..." . So the boards could be either square or in the diamond orientation, as long as they could accommodate the placards. This reg predates the ICC rule by two or three years; perhaps the ARA knew it was in the pipeline.

I can find no mention of these placards in the earlier MCB Specifications (1917, 1918).
Note that the metal-frame holders that allowed the standard placards to be dropped into place (rather than tacked) were mandated on newly built cars, and on those receiving general repairs, with an effective date of Oct 14, 1932. This is according to the 1938 Code of Federal Regulations.

Dave ParkerRiverside, CA


On Friday, June 16, 2017 3:53 AM, "'Richard W. Chapin' rwc27q@verizon.net [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


I have a copy of “Transportation of Explosives and Other Dangerous Articles by Freight including Specifications for Shipping Containers”, issued 12/11/1922, effective 1/1/1923. Required by a 3/4/1921 amendment to the Transportation Act of 1920. This is a ICC publication of regulations [actually labelled as “Freight Tariff No.1”. Article 700 is “Labels” and shows required placards [classic diamonds]; red for inflammable liquids & gases, yellow for inflammable solids, white for acids & corrosives, white with red letters for poison gases and green for non-inflammable gases. These required on packaging. Article 900 is required “Placarding of Cars”, but this has illustrations for explosives, poison gas, inflammable liquids and acids only. The last two are diamonds like the packaging, while the first two are rectangles. So, 1/1/1923 is an official date for placards. I note colors noted above are currently used [e.g., yellow flammable solid] So, did the diamond come for the law requiring these regs? Or perhaps from a prior Bureau of Explosives document? I have found articles that say railroads required labels for Dangerous Goods in 1910, but have yet to find any specifics on that. Rich Chapin27 Quincy Rd Basking Ridge, NJ 07920-2222 #yiv4558527583 #yiv4558527583 -- #yiv4558527583ygrp-mkp {border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px 0;padding:0 10px;}#yiv4558527583 #yiv4558527583ygrp-mkp hr {border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}#yiv4558527583 #yiv4558527583ygrp-mkp #yiv4558527583hd {color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px 0;}#yiv4558527583 #yiv4558527583ygrp-mkp #yiv4558527583ads {margin-bottom:10px;}#yiv4558527583 #yiv4558527583ygrp-mkp .yiv4558527583ad {padding:0 0;}#yiv4558527583 #yiv4558527583ygrp-mkp .yiv4558527583ad p {margin:0;}#yiv4558527583 #yiv4558527583ygrp-mkp .yiv4558527583ad a {color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}#yiv4558527583 #yiv4558527583ygrp-sponsor #yiv4558527583ygrp-lc {font-family:Arial;}#yiv4558527583 #yiv4558527583ygrp-sponsor #yiv4558527583ygrp-lc #yiv4558527583hd {margin:10px 0px;font-weight:700;font-size:78%;line-height:122%;}#yiv4558527583 #yiv4558527583ygrp-sponsor #yiv4558527583ygrp-lc 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