Tank Car Loading...Maybe


thecitrusbelt@...
 

First, ignore the fact that this is another reversed printed photo.

 

Looking carefully at this photo what I see is an angled pipe routed from the shed next to the vertical tanks into the ground near the tracks. Across the tracks I see a pipe rising from the ground and then making a ninety degree turn, terminating over the dome of the tank car.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12345738043/in/dateposted/

 

Does anyone have a different interpretation of this photo?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Tim O'Connor
 

Bob

I've seen similar structures for loading or unloading tank cars. Obviously the horizontal
pipe could swing out of the way as needed. I've also seen examples where the horizontal
pipe lifts out of the way, like on a trackside water tank.

Tim O'



First, ignore the fact that this is another reversed printed photo.

Looking carefully at this photo what I see is an angled pipe routed from the shed next to the vertical tanks into the ground near the tracks. Across the tracks I see a pipe rising from the ground and then making a ninety degree turn, terminating over the dome of the tank car.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12345738043/in/dateposted/

Does anyone have a different interpretation of this photo?

Bob Chaparro


Jack Mullen
 

Unloading, not loading.

Jack Mullen


Jim Betz
 

Hi,

  This provides an interesting possibility for a layout facility - where you 
don't have enough room on the layout where the spur/siding is ... but there
is room on the other side of the main.  So just do what was done here!
  The obvious reason for doing it this way (in this photo) was to provide
access to the trucks that would be loaded from the vertical tanks.  

  I like this picture as a candidate for a "layout solution"!
                                                                                       - Jim


Tony Thompson
 

Jim Betz wrote:

 

 This provides an interesting possibility for a layout facility - where you  don't have enough room on the layout where the spur/siding is ... but there is room on the other side of the main.  So just do what was done here!

  The obvious reason for doing it this way (in this photo) was to provide
access to the trucks that would be loaded from the vertical tanks.  

  I like this picture as a candidate for a "layout solution"!

        Maybe. But I think the previous comment by Jack Mullen, that it looks far more like unloading through the manway, than like loading, is correct.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Bruce Smith
 

​I'm just piling on at this point but this is an unloading facility.  Even with outlets at the bottom, many facilities unloaded tank cars from the top.


Regards

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, June 18, 2017 11:28 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Tank Car Loading...Maybe
 


First, ignore the fact that this is another reversed printed photo.

 

Looking carefully at this photo what I see is an angled pipe routed from the shed next to the vertical tanks into the ground near the tracks. Across the tracks I see a pipe rising from the ground and then making a ninety degree turn, terminating over the dome of the tank car.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12345738043/in/dateposted/

 

Does anyone have a different interpretation of this photo?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA




rwitt_2000
 

Here is another one, a very minimalist unloading facility.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12345401603/in/photostream/

Bob Witt


Andy Laurent
 

It certainly appears that the Sinclair bulk distributor on the left ran a pipe under the main line to access the spur on the other side of the tracks to unload petroleum products.  The Ahnapee & Western Rwy (my prototype of choice) had a similar arrangement at Forestville, Wisconsin that ran under a city street and the railroad mainline.  The town can be seen here: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-4ubNstM6-eg/UI1UQfCKdEI/AAAAAAAACiU/9m0rcBgsGqo/s1600/Forestville+Hi+Res.jpg with the petroleum dealer in question at the lower right corner of the lake, with white tanks.  The unloading rack was near the southern of the three buildings to the right.

Top unloading of petroleum products from tank cars was fairly common in Wisconsin during the steam era.

Andy Laurent
Iowa City, IA


Jared Harper
 

This is the way all the bulk oil plants worked on Santa Fe's Alma branch in Kansas.  The storage tanks and warehouses were along the main and contained the pump.  A pipe went from this facility under the track over to a penstock along the house track.  A pipe on the penstock could go down into the dome on the tank car and the contents could be pumped out.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


---In STMFC@..., <andy.laurent@...> wrote :

It certainly appears that the Sinclair bulk distributor on the left ran a pipe under the main line to access the spur on the other side of the tracks to unload petroleum products.  The Ahnapee & Western Rwy (my prototype of choice) had a similar arrangement at Forestville, Wisconsin that ran under a city street and the railroad mainline.  The town can be seen here: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-4ubNstM6-eg/UI1UQfCKdEI/AAAAAAAACiU/9m0rcBgsGqo/s1600/Forestville+Hi+Res.jpg with the petroleum dealer in question at the lower right corner of the lake, with white tanks.  The unloading rack was near the southern of the three buildings to the right.

Top unloading of petroleum products from tank cars was fairly common in Wisconsin during the steam era.

Andy Laurent
Iowa City, IA


Steve SANDIFER
 

Exactly the same for a dealer in Eureka Kansas.

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, June 18, 2017 1:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tank Car Loading...Maybe

 

 

This is the way all the bulk oil plants worked on Santa Fe's Alma branch in Kansas.  The storage tanks and warehouses were along the main and contained the pump.  A pipe went from this facility under the track over to a penstock along the house track.  A pipe on the penstock could go down into the dome on the tank car and the contents could be pumped out.

 

Jared Harper

Athens, GA



---In STMFC@..., <andy.laurent@...> wrote :

It certainly appears that the Sinclair bulk distributor on the left ran a pipe under the main line to access the spur on the other side of the tracks to unload petroleum products.  The Ahnapee & Western Rwy (my prototype of choice) had a similar arrangement at Forestville, Wisconsin that ran under a city street and the railroad mainline.  The town can be seen here: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-4ubNstM6-eg/UI1UQfCKdEI/AAAAAAAACiU/9m0rcBgsGqo/s1600/Forestville+Hi+Res.jpg with the petroleum dealer in question at the lower right corner of the lake, with white tanks.  The unloading rack was near the southern of the three buildings to the right.

Top unloading of petroleum products from tank cars was fairly common in Wisconsin during the steam era.

Andy Laurent
Iowa City, IA


Tony Thompson
 

       We know that a number of states used to prohibit bottom unloading, others permitted it. So as a modeler, you need to find out what the rules were for the state you model. California did permit bottom unloading and many photos are consistent with that. A number of Midwestern states required top unloading and photos support that.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history