General Electric Tank Car


thecitrusbelt@...
 

This car has a somewhat unusual arrangement of hatches(?) along the top of the tank. What are these if not hatches and what commodities would have been carried in such cars?

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/24794887695/in/dateposted/

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Eric Hansmann
 

Might this GE tank car carry granular material of some sort? I see three receptacles at the running board that might be used for unloading. I think the Barrett Company had some tank cars to haul granules, too.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, July 06, 2017 3:35 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] General Electric Tank Car

 




This car has a somewhat unusual arrangement of hatches(?) along the top of the tank. What are these if not hatches and what commodities would have been carried in such cars?

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/24794887695/in/dateposted/

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



Bill Welch
 

I see Five outlets. Although built by AC&F, it is not one of their underframes.

Bill Welch


Tony Thompson
 

Bill Welch wrote:

 

I see Five outlets. Although built by AC&F, it is not one of their under frames.


     The AC&F tank car books are full of examples of AC&F building a new tank on an old underframe.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






brianleppert@att.net
 

That's a AC&F Type 25 underframe.  And zoom in at the tank end.  Instead of  giving gallon capacity, its stenciled "1113 Cubic Feet".

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Steve and Barb Hile
 

Note that the capacity of the tank, stenciled on the end is not in liquid units (gallons), but in solid units - 1113 cubic feet.  This is an early example of trying to adapt tank car technology to hauling dry substances that could flow somewhat like a liquid, in this case silica sand, most likely, for the production of light bulbs.  Hence the multiple hatches and unloading nozzles (and no safety valves on the dome.)
 
Steve Hile



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, July 06, 2017 3:35 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] General Electric Tank Car

 

This car has a somewhat unusual arrangement of hatches(?) along the top of the tank. What are these if not hatches and what commodities would have been carried in such cars?

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/24794887695/in/dateposted/

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


thecitrusbelt@...
 

By the way, all of us have used Mazda lamps. I won't go into it here but if you Google "mazda lamp" you'll be in the know...great cocktail party conversational item.


Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


brianleppert@att.net
 

Earlier this month there was a brief discussion on a General Electric tank car.  It seemed some members were not familiar with the AC&F Type 25 underframe.  I have added to our Files section a page from an AC&F catalog showing their Type 25 tank car at

   https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/files/AC%26F%20Type%2025.jpg

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Tim O'Connor
 


Were many Type 25's built ?? These could easily be confused with GATC tank cars.

Tim O'Connor



Earlier this month there was a brief discussion on a General Electric tank car.  It seemed some members were not familiar with the AC&F Type 25 underframe.  I have added to our Files section a page from an AC&F catalog showing their Type 25 tank car at

   https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/files/AC%26F%20Type%2025.jpg

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Ian Cranstone
 

Brian, much appreciated.  I was one of those members unfamiliar with the Type 25 underframe.  I think Canadian Car & Foundry built examples as well, likely under licence.

Ian Cranstone

Osgoode, Ontario, Canada

lamontc@...

http://freightcars.nakina.net


On 2017-07-23, at 3:39 PM, brianleppert@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Earlier this month there was a brief discussion on a General Electric tank car.  It seemed some members were not familiar with the AC&F Type 25 underframe.  I have added to our Files section a page from an AC&F catalog showing their Type 25 tank car at

   https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/files/AC%26F%20Type%2025.jpg

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


brianleppert@att.net
 

I need to make a retraction of my Type 25 statement.  Ed Hawkins has informed me that the General Electric tank car is actually an AC&F type 26.  Although there does not seem to be much difference between the two designs, I do notice the Type 26 does not have the "heavy steel diaphragms extending from the center sills at each end of the car".

There were only 2 orders for Type 25 cars for the US/Canadian market, totaling 15 tank cars.  The Type 26 design received 22 orders for 546 cars.  In comparison, there were over 1800 Type 27 tanks cars built, as mentioned in Railway Prototype Cyclopedia, vol. 2.

There was also an AC&F Type 25A design.  Not many of these were built.

Another photo of a Type 26 tank car, SCAX 625, appeared on page 70 in Kaminski's American Car & Foundry, 1899-1999 book.

My thanks to Ed Hawkins, who provided an overwhelming amount information to me.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV