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Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?


thecitrusbelt@...
 

How much would a 33-inch freight car wheel weigh, both new and worn, on average? I appreciate allowances need to be made for wheel style, manufacturer and era, but let's say an "average" wheel in the steam-diesel transition era.

 

I recall seeing a figure of 800 pounds in the distant past, but I have no idea if that is accurate.

 

The reason I ask is to settle a debate about how many wheels could be carried in a freight car with a fifty ton capacity.

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Tony Thompson
 

How much would a 33-inch freight car wheel weigh, both new and worn, on average? I appreciate allowances need to be made for wheel style, manufacturer and era, but let's say an "average" wheel in the steam-diesel transition er

I recall seeing a figure of 800 pounds in the distant past, but I have no idea if that is accurate.

       A couple of published documents refer to weights between 800 and 900 pounds.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Rhbale@...
 

It is my understanding that modern 33-inch freight car wheels weigh 900 to 1,000 each. An axle is in the same neighborhood so a wheelset of two wheels and one axle would be in the range of 2,700 to 3,000 lbs. 
RHB
 
 

In a message dated 10/2/2017 10:23:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

How much would a 33-inch freight car wheel weigh, both new and worn, on average? I appreciate allowances need to be made for wheel style, manufacturer and era, but let's say an "average" wheel in the steam-diesel transition era.

 

I recall seeing a figure of 800 pounds in the distant past, but I have no idea if that is accurate.

 

The reason I ask is to settle a debate about how many wheels could be carried in a freight car with a fifty ton capacity.

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Jeff Coleman
 

Bob
I'm not sure you'd see individual wheels as a car load but rather a wheel set. Two wheel plates and axle.
33" 50 ton = 2200 lbs & 33" 70 ton 2400 
lbs. These weights would be for new. Worn would only reduce weight by avgerage 100 lbs per set. 

Jeff Coleman

On Oct 3, 2017 1:23 AM, "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

How much would a 33-inch freight car wheel weigh, both new and worn, on average? I appreciate allowances need to be made for wheel style, manufacturer and era, but let's say an "average" wheel in the steam-diesel transition era.

 

I recall seeing a figure of 800 pounds in the distant past, but I have no idea if that is accurate.

 

The reason I ask is to settle a debate about how many wheels could be carried in a freight car with a fifty ton capacity.

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <thecitrusbelt@...> wrote :

How much would a 33-inch freight car wheel weigh, both new and worn, on average? I appreciate allowances need to be made for wheel style, manufacturer and era, but let's say an "average" wheel in the steam-diesel transition era.

 

I recall seeing a figure of 800 pounds in the distant past, but I have no idea if that is accurate.

 

The reason I ask is to settle a debate about how many wheels could be carried in a freight car with a fifty ton capacity.

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

=====================


I'm a little surprised that the MCB drawings someone linked to the other day don't include the weight of the various wheels, but they don't. However, as far as cast iron wheels are concerned, I recall different capacity wheels being referred toin the trade press by weight; 750# wheels, 800# wheels, etc. I would assume that wrought steel wheels of equal size are essentially the same.


Now, did you mean loose wheels, or wheelsets? I had to look into this a number of years ago to estimate a transit weight for a car in preservation, and as I recall, one car axle weighted about the same as one wheel, so a wheelset, two wheels and an axle, was just over 2000#, or one ton.


Dennis Storzek


 

http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/13/t/247226.aspx





Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni



From: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tuesday, October 3, 2017 at 10:13 AM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?









---In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, <thecitrusbelt@...> wrote :

How much would a 33-inch freight car wheel weigh, both new and worn, on average? I appreciate allowances need to be made for wheel style, manufacturer and era, but let's say an "average" wheel in the steam-diesel transition era.



I recall seeing a figure of 800 pounds in the distant past, but I have no idea if that is accurate.



The reason I ask is to settle a debate about how many wheels could be carried in a freight car with a fifty ton capacity.



Thanks.



Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

=====================



I'm a little surprised that the MCB drawings someone linked to the other day don't include the weight of the various wheels, but they don't. However, as far as cast iron wheels are concerned, I recall different capacity wheels being referred toin the trade press by weight; 750# wheels, 800# wheels, etc. I would assume that wrought steel wheels of equal size are essentially the same.



Now, did you mean loose wheels, or wheelsets? I had to look into this a number of years ago to estimate a transit weight for a car in preservation, and as I recall, one car axle weighted about the same as one wheel, so a wheelset, two wheels and an axle, was just over 2000#, or one ton.



Dennis Storzek





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


 

This car appears to be a capy of 140,000: http://www.billspennsyphotos.com/photos/undefined/PRR%20F45%20Flat%20Car%20-491165%20E22700%20BLT%203-26%20Wheel%20Loaded%201024x.jpg







Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni



From: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tuesday, October 3, 2017 at 10:13 AM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?









---In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, <thecitrusbelt@...> wrote :

How much would a 33-inch freight car wheel weigh, both new and worn, on average? I appreciate allowances need to be made for wheel style, manufacturer and era, but let's say an "average" wheel in the steam-diesel transition era.



I recall seeing a figure of 800 pounds in the distant past, but I have no idea if that is accurate.



The reason I ask is to settle a debate about how many wheels could be carried in a freight car with a fifty ton capacity.



Thanks.



Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

=====================



I'm a little surprised that the MCB drawings someone linked to the other day don't include the weight of the various wheels, but they don't. However, as far as cast iron wheels are concerned, I recall different capacity wheels being referred toin the trade press by weight; 750# wheels, 800# wheels, etc. I would assume that wrought steel wheels of equal size are essentially the same.



Now, did you mean loose wheels, or wheelsets? I had to look into this a number of years ago to estimate a transit weight for a car in preservation, and as I recall, one car axle weighted about the same as one wheel, so a wheelset, two wheels and an axle, was just over 2000#, or one ton.



Dennis Storzek


Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Gang;

Brian is correct, it was rebuilt as a 70-ton capacity car to haul freight car wheelsets, based on an old baggage car chassis. Unfortunately you have axles in there, but by the end date of this list, they were mostly shipping them as complete wheelsets.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, October 03, 2017 11:23 AM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [STMFC] Re: Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?



This car appears to be a capy of 140,000: Blockedhttp://www.billspennsyphotos.com/photos/undefined/PRR%20F45%20Flat%20Car%20-491165%20E22700%20BLT%203-26%20Wheel%20Loaded%201024x.jpg

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tuesday, October 3, 2017 at 10:13 AM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?

---In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, <thecitrusbelt@...> wrote :

How much would a 33-inch freight car wheel weigh, both new and worn, on average? I appreciate allowances need to be made for wheel style, manufacturer and era, but let's say an "average" wheel in the steam-diesel transition era.

I recall seeing a figure of 800 pounds in the distant past, but I have no idea if that is accurate.

The reason I ask is to settle a debate about how many wheels could be carried in a freight car with a fifty ton capacity.

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

=====================

I'm a little surprised that the MCB drawings someone linked to the other day don't include the weight of the various wheels, but they don't. However, as far as cast iron wheels are concerned, I recall different capacity wheels being referred toin the trade press by weight; 750# wheels, 800# wheels, etc. I would assume that wrought steel wheels of equal size are essentially the same.

Now, did you mean loose wheels, or wheelsets? I had to look into this a number of years ago to estimate a transit weight for a car in preservation, and as I recall, one car axle weighted about the same as one wheel, so a wheelset, two wheels and an axle, was just over 2000#, or one ton.

Dennis Storzek

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Jack Mullen
 

Unmounted wheels were indeed shipped in carload lots as new wheels or worn wheels as scrap. Large car shops would be equipped with wheel presses for mounting and dismounting wheels. 

A quick look on the internet phor a photo of a car of wheels came up empty, but here's a neat picture of what seems to be the shipping area at Griffin Wheel's St.Paul plant, c1918. That must be a very sturdy loading dock.


 


Dennis Storzek
 

Here is, I think, a more direct link to the Griffin Wheel Co. pic:

https://saintpaulbybike.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/griffin-wheel-company-c1918.jpg

 

Note ALL the wheels are standing on edge. I recall reading years ago was the standard method of handling was to have men roll them. Even though each wheel weighed 750-900 pounds, if held at the proper angle they were easily (relative term) balanced and rolled, same as a mounted truck tire. Once they fell over, they were a major project to lift upright again..

Dennis Storzek


Tony Thompson
 

Dennis Storzek wrote:

Note ALL the wheels are standing on edge. I recall reading years ago was the standard method of handling was to have men roll them. Even though each wheel weighed 750-900 pounds, if held at the proper angle they were easily (relative term) balanced and rolled, same as a mounted truck tire. Once they fell over, they were a major project to lift upright again..


     For anyone interested, I included a photo of an SP workman rolling one of these wheels, in a blog post awhile back. Here's the link:


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Dennis Storzek
 

I find it interesting that the Pennsy found reason to retain the steam line on this car:

http://www.billspennsyphotos.com/photos/undefined/PRR%20F45%20Flat%20Car%20-491165%20E22700%20BLT%203-26%20Wheel%20Loaded%201024x.jpg

  I suppose it makes sense if the normal route is to a passenger car maintenance facility, it would allow adding the car to a deadhead move and still maintain heat to the cars.


Dennis Storzek






Bruce Smith
 

Dennis,

One does have to wonder why wheel sets, be they freight or passenger, would be an “express” cargo ;)  Note that the trucks appear to be off of an H21 hopper.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Oct 3, 2017, at 2:53 PM, destorzek@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



I find it interesting that the Pennsy found reason to retain the steam line on this car:

http://www.billspennsyphotos.com/photos/undefined/PRR%20F45%20Flat%20Car%20-491165%20E22700%20BLT%203-26%20Wheel%20Loaded%201024x.jpg

  I suppose it makes sense if the normal route is to a passenger car maintenance facility, it would allow adding the car to a deadhead move and still maintain heat to the cars.


Dennis Storzek









Bill Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Most likely because it was less cost to leave the steam line in place than to pay the labor costs to remove it. Just a guess. 

Another guess is that the steam line remained to serve the thawing of wheelsets that may have frozen to the steel support racks. Maybe...

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA 


On Oct 3, 2017, at 12:53 PM, destorzek@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

I find it interesting that the Pennsy found reason to retain the steam line on this car:


http://www.billspennsyphotos.com/photos/undefined/PRR%20F45%20Flat%20Car%20-491165%20E22700%20BLT%203-26%20Wheel%20Loaded%201024x.jpg

  I suppose it makes sense if the normal route is to a passenger car maintenance facility, it would allow adding the car to a deadhead move and still maintain heat to the cars.


Dennis Storzek








Jack Mullen
 

The PRRT&HS Flat car book notes that of 26 F45, "at least seven were authorized to operate on the rear of passenger trains".  

As with other cars fitted for carrying wheelsets, the weight of a full load is much less than the car's capacity.  PRR took advantage of this to carry other car material in addition to the wheels; note the supply bins at the car"s ends.

These car's were converted from B60B baggage cars in 1963 and '65  That makes them out of scope here as freight equipment. Many railroads did use similar conversions from flatcars, during the steam era.

Jack Mullen


George Courtney
 

Ok. the moderator is going to ban me, but I can pick up two wheels on an axle using two fingers.  Did it the other night.in fact.  Now off to jail.

George Courtney