50' w/6' door


Clark Propst
 

Several heartland railroads bought 50’ box cars with 6’ doors. I picked up a Rib Side Cars kit at a train show yesterday. I’m curious to know their intended use.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Benjamin Hom
 


Clark Propst wrote:
"Several heartland railroads bought 50’ box cars with 6’ doors. I picked up a Rib Side Cars kit at a train show yesterday. I’m curious to know their intended use."

Basically big 40 ft boxcars.  The 6 ft door opening makes them suited for existing grain doors, which would be attractive to the granger roads.  Of course, wider door openings were becoming more attractive for general service, especially with the wider use of forktrucks.


Ben Hom  


Bill Welch
 

I picked one of those up too Clark, thought the look very interesting. CNW and IC had 50-footers w/6-foot doors too, kind of funky looking in a good way. Wish someone would do them in resin.

Sorry to see the Rib-side car line disappear as they can be made into very interesting and good models.

Bill Welch


Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <fgexbill@...> wrote :

I picked one of those up too Clark, thought the look very interesting. CNW and IC had 50-footers w/6-foot doors too, kind of funky looking in a good way. Wish someone would do them in resin.
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The Soo Line had them too, 136200-136298 even, 50 cars built by Pullman-Standard in 1936. These were 10'-0" IH cars, and looked really weird with their almost flat Pullman built doors. These were only 50 ton cars, and I remember reading that they were intended for LCL service.

The strange doors did not last long. By 1953 10 cars had already been rebuilt with 8' doors; five of them receiving perforated metal linings for packaged foodstuff loading, Mech. Designation XME. The doors were slightly staggered; the left edge of the opening remained as built while the opening was extended two feet to the right. The new doors were Improved Youngstown. By 1962 the 48 remaining cars had all been converted, and some had received DF loaders.

Dennis Storzek