Gondola Load: What Is It?


thecitrusbelt@...
 

This photo is from the Ray Breyer collection. The load appears to be rolled coils of metal, but the manner of loading seems too haphazard for such a load:

 

https://i1.wp.com/designbuildop.hansmanns.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/201705_reading_gm4.jpg

 

So is this load something else?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


 

Could be an insurance claim photo for when the load shifted?





Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni



From: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 2:53 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Gondola Load: What Is It?





This photo is from the Ray Breyer collection. The load appears to be rolled coils of metal, but the manner of loading seems too haphazard for such a load:



https://i1.wp.com/designbuildop.hansmanns.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/201705_reading_gm4.jpg



So is this load something else?



Thanks.



Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Douglas Harding
 

Bob I seem to recall that photo having been discussed before. The consensus was that it was a load of steel coils, loaded on end. The car had been involved in a mishap and the load had been jostled. The photo may even be from a damage claim report.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 2:53 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Gondola Load: What Is It?

 

 

This photo is from the Ray Breyer collection. The load appears to be rolled coils of metal, but the manner of loading seems too haphazard for such a load:

 

https://i1.wp.com/designbuildop.hansmanns.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/201705_reading_gm4.jpg

 

So is this load something else?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Charlie Vlk
 

Looks like the photo was taken to document rough handling of the car and resultant damage to the coil load.
Charlie Vlk


On Nov 22, 2017, at 2:53 PM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

This photo is from the Ray Breyer collection. The load appears to be rolled coils of metal, but the manner of loading seems too haphazard for such a load:

 

https://i1.wp.com/designbuildop.hansmanns.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/201705_reading_gm4.jpg

 

So is this load something else?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


jczzo126 CocuzzaT
 

My guess is that these are coils of aluminum, maybe from the Alcoa works at Cressona, Pa. That would explain why there are so many in the car and why they were banded and loaded in upright. Probably is a damage claim photo.

On Wed, Nov 22, 2017 at 3:53 PM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

This photo is from the Ray Breyer collection. The load appears to be rolled coils of metal, but the manner of loading seems too haphazard for such a load:

 

https://i1.wp.com/designbuildop.hansmanns.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/201705_reading_gm4.jpg

 

So is this load something else?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



 

Would also agree with coiled aluminum. Have seen many many coil steel loads & have never seen them loaded on end. They were always on their sides.


Allen Rueter
 

I would also agree with coiled Al, but never say never. Having worked in Cold Rolled Finishing,
loading eye2sky happens when the width gets narrow relative to its height. It also happens when the coiled sheet gets thin and the coil would sag. eye2sky also tended to ship on pallets, unless shipper & receiver had the pincher hook.  Coils that went through the slitter, got wrapped by a lot of bands.
--
Allen Rueter
StLouis MO
Gary Works, 73,75,76




Charles Tapper
 

This is an insurance photo for a shifted load at Avella Pa, on the P&WV , on March 27th 1937, per the P&WV Hiline website. There are two gons involved and I would say the shifted loads are most likely steel, not aluminum. Here are some links:


http://www.thepwvhiline.com/WreckDerailmentsandDamage/Metal_Coils_At_Avella_001_Web.html



Guy Wilber
 

Charlie wrote:

“This is an insurance photo for a shifted load at Avella Pa, on the P&WV , on March 27th 1937, per the P&WV Hiline website.”

Charlie, my old neighbor,

The photos were obviously taken to document the shifted load, but the damage claim was more likely settled by the railroad(s) involved in the haul than any insurance company.

I’ve never seen reference to an insurance company within the ARA/AAR Freight Claim Division’s Proceedings or Arbitration Cases, but I am open to factual information regarding this, or any other freight claim.

There was no specific AAR loading practice for steel coils (circa 1937), but these loads are similar to boilers or large sections of pipe positioned vertically in gondolas. Note also, the steel strapping which was much more common during the era than generally believed.

The road accepting such loads (for interchange) would have been held accountable for the damage irrespective of the deficiencies of the loading and securement practices.

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Charles Tapper
 

Hi Guy! I just quoted the caption FWIW.. In the caption they mention/implied Weber & Cavanaugh as being whom the settlement was for. I do not know who they were, nor the veracity of the citation. The site owners do have information I presume and may or may not not have more information from their archives. Hope you are well!

Charlie Tapper
Broken Arrow, OK


On Nov 24, 2017, at 10:24 AM, Guy Wilber guycwilber@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Charlie wrote:

“This is an insurance photo for a shifted load at Avella Pa, on the P&WV , on March 27th 1937, per the P&WV Hiline website.”

Charlie, my old neighbor,

The photos were obviously taken to document the shifted load, but the damage claim was more likely settled by the railroad(s) involved in the haul than any insurance company.

I’ve never seen reference to an insurance company within the ARA/AAR Freight Claim Division’s Proceedings or Arbitration Cases, but I am open to factual information regarding this, or any other freight claim.

There was no specific AAR loading practice for steel coils (circa 1937), but these loads are similar to boilers or large sections of pipe positioned vertically in gondolas. Note also, the steel strapping which was much more common during the era than generally believed.

The road accepting such loads (for interchange) would have been held accountable for the damage irrespective of the deficiencies of the loading and securement practices.

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada