Tru-color paint


Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

    Not having quick access to thinner is acetone* an acceptable thinner?  For the paint cup only or to be added to the jar?


* or would MEK be better?

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Scott
 

On the label of thier thinner the only ingredient they list is acetone. I wouldnt mix it in the paint bottle for sure paint cup only.

Scott McDonald


Tim O'Connor
 


For CLEANING the airbrush, yes.

On a model? You are taking a risk! Normal concentration of acetone is about 1/3,
and the normal concentration of MEK is a little more than 1/3. But there are two
other solvents as well. YMMV.

Tim O'Connor




Not having quick access to thinner is acetone* an acceptable thinner? For the paint cup only or to be added to the jar?

* or would MEK be better?

Jon Miller


Nelson Moyer
 

I called Tru Color to ask the same question and was told that acetone was a relatively minor ingredient in the thinner and there are several others ingredients. They don’t recommend thinning paint with Acetone, but Acetone is fine for cleanup. Of course, they sell a pint of thinner for $43.95, so why wouldn’t they say that. Apparently, thinning with acetone alone changes the handling and drying characteristics of the paint, particularly the shiny finish.

 

Jon, your question raised other questions. Why do you want to thin the paint? Tru Color claims it’s ready to spray without thinning, and I’ve painted ten cars so far shooting straight paint at 20 psi with a gravity feed airbrush. I think thinning would require more coats than straight paint. I’m curious, how many modelers thin vs. not thin, and how many coats do you average for thinned vs not thinned?

 

One problem I’ve noticed with Tru Color is that the bottle caps aren’t always tight on the shelves, and I’ve had evaporative losses up to 3-4 ml. per bottle before I caught it. I don’t know if the caps weren’t tightened properly at the plant, or the worked loose due to temperature changes, but I suspect I’ve had some of both. I brought up the new bottles to full volume with Tru Color thinner, then really tightened the caps hard. So far, I haven’t had additional evaporative loss. Now I always check the volume, add thinner if necessary, and tighten the cap on all new bottles.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2018 12:11 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Tru-color paint

 

 

    Not having quick access to thinner is acetone* an acceptable thinner?  For the paint cup only or to be added to the jar?

 

* or would MEK be better?

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 1/18/2018 11:48 AM, Nelson Moyer npmoyer@... [STMFC] wrote:
Why do you want to thin the paint?

    I'm not getting a fine mist out of the jar.  I think the solvent has evaporated out of the sealed jar.  As I'm used to either Floquil or Scalecoat probably adjusting badly.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Allen Montgomery <sandbear75@...>
 

I spent yesterday wailing and gnashing my teeth trying to get Tru Color to behave properly. Fail. I don't want to sound like a Negative Nellie, but I'm tired of fighting a losing battle. That being said, let me share some thoughts.
Xylene works as a thinner. I had hit and miss results with Acetone.
It seems the moon has something to do with how the paint goes through an airbrush. Sometimes it spits and comes out in little chunks. I don't know why this happens, even with their thinner. But to get it to flow right, I've found that I have to thin it so much that it takes the whole bottle to get half way coverage on a project. Total waste of money and time. Thank goodness the air is free.
Sometimes the sheen is shiny, sometimes it's acceptable. Maddening.
Yesterday, I was working on an S-scale wooden depot for a friend. I sealed the walls so that it wouldn't take multiple bottles just to get a decent coat of paint. The thing looked more like stucco after trying Tru Color Buff. No matter what the p.s.i. was set at, I couldn't get good results. Since the company is in my state, I'm going to go down there and sit in the lobby until they show me their paint works.
I picked up some Scalecoat II at Caboose Hobbies last summer. Wasn't thrilled with the results of that either.
"Floquil, why have you forsaken me?!?!"
Sincerly,
Frustrated Painter


Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 1/18/2018 12:11 PM, Allen Montgomery sandbear75@... [STMFC] wrote:
I picked up some Scalecoat II at Caboose Hobbies last summer.

    Did a little Googling and it seem Scalecoat was sold to another company.  I can't determine if Scalecoat I is available or not.  I do have some left and will use that until I run out.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Pierre Oliver
 

Minuteman Scale Models, http://www.minutemanscalemodels.com/

Bought the Scalecoat line and currently sells both I and II formulations

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 2018-01-18 3:18 PM, Jon Miller atsfus@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

On 1/18/2018 12:11 PM, Allen Montgomery sandbear75@... [STMFC] wrote:
I picked up some Scalecoat II at Caboose Hobbies last summer.

    Did a little Googling and it seem Scalecoat was sold to another company.  I can't determine if Scalecoat I is available or not.  I do have some left and will use that until I run out.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Nelson Moyer
 

You might have to turn up the air pressure. I gave the air pressure if 20 psi under paint load. The compressor is set to about 28 psi under no load. A new bottle is filled to the top of the curve at the top of the bottle. If you see less total volume, you have evaporative loss.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2018 2:09 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Tru-color paint

 

 

On 1/18/2018 11:48 AM, Nelson Moyer npmoyer@... [STMFC] wrote:

Why do you want to thin the paint?

    I'm not getting a fine mist out of the jar.  I think the solvent has evaporated out of the sealed jar.  As I'm used to either Floquil or Scalecoat probably adjusting badly.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Tim O'Connor
 


TruColor, like Accupaint, comes in plastic bottles that are not 100% airtight.
It evaporates. The good news is that adding back the thinner and a couple of drops
of the retarder will restore the paint back to new condition. If you open a new
bottle and there's less than an ounce, you'll need to restore it to an ounce.
The concentration of solvents vs pigments DEFINITELY affects the quality of the
finish! The paint is also very sensitive to humidity. Water will adsorb onto the
model surface and create a gritty, non-glossy result. This effect is worsened if
the paint is not properly thinned.

Tim O'Connor



Why do you want to thin the paint?

I'm not getting a fine mist out of the jar. I think the solvent has evaporated out of the sealed jar. As I'm used to either Floquil or Scalecoat probably adjusting badly.
Jon Miller


Nelson Moyer
 

I’ve never had “chunks” out of the airbrush with Tru Color. I mix thoroughly, but I haven’t needed to filter yet, but all my painting so far has started with a new bottle. Tru Color doesn’t like humidity. I paint only when the relative humidity is below 60%. The paint has to go on very slightly wet at the center of the spray pattern, and you have to overlap the wet part with subsequent passes. Light passes are best, and let it dry between coats. Spraying too thick and too close will cause it to run, as with any paint. Tru Color takes some getting used to! Adherence is a problem unless you prime before painting.

 

My only problem has been random lint on the painted surface. I think I’ve traced it to my sweatshirt. From now on, I’ll paint in a short sleeve shirt that has a hard finish.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2018 2:11 PM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tru-color paint

 

 

I spent yesterday wailing and gnashing my teeth trying to get Tru Color to behave properly. Fail. I don't want to sound like a Negative Nellie, but I'm tired of fighting a losing battle. That being said, let me share some thoughts.

Xylene works as a thinner. I had hit and miss results with Acetone.

It seems the moon has something to do with how the paint goes through an airbrush. Sometimes it spits and comes out in little chunks. I don't know why this happens, even with their thinner. But to get it to flow right, I've found that I have to thin it so much that it takes the whole bottle to get half way coverage on a project. Total waste of money and time. Thank goodness the air is free.

Sometimes the sheen is shiny, sometimes it's acceptable. Maddening.

Yesterday, I was working on an S-scale wooden depot for a friend. I sealed the walls so that it wouldn't take multiple bottles just to get a decent coat of paint. The thing looked more like stucco after trying Tru Color Buff. No matter what the p.s.i. was set at, I couldn't get good results. Since the company is in my state, I'm going to go down there and sit in the lobby until they show me their paint works.

I picked up some Scalecoat II at Caboose Hobbies last summer. Wasn't thrilled with the results of that either.

"Floquil, why have you forsaken me?!?!"

Sincerly,

Frustrated Painter


Lee Thwaits
 

In using other than Trucolor thinner I have not gotten good adherence.  I asked Trucolor about this and was told their thinner was a mix compatible with their paint (which is not actually a paint(?)) and not an off the shelf product.

Lee Thwaits


Tim O'Connor
 


What are you painting? TruColor/Accupaint/Star paints (same formulation) will
adhere beautifully to clean polystyrene. If you're painting brass, metal, or
polyurethane resin, you'll need to prime first to get a really good bond.

Tim O'Connor



In using other than Trucolor thinner I have not gotten good adherence.� 
I asked Trucolor about this and was told their thinner was a mix
compatible with their paint (which is not actually a paint(?)) and not
an off the shelf product.

Lee Thwaits


Scott
 

It has been my experience as well that TruColor needs to be REALLY thin for it to spray.  I use vallejo primer as I think it lays out smooth as can be.  The down side to vallejo is it is not in the least bit sand-able.  I have not had problems with it sticking to the primer.  I am using an Iwata HP-CH so I dont think its that.

Scott McDonald


riverman_vt@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <sandbear75@...> wrote :

I spent yesterday wailing and gnashing my teeth trying to get Tru Color to behave properly. Fail. I don't want to sound like a Negative Nellie, but I'm tired of fighting a losing battle. That being said, let me share some thoughts.
Xylene works as a thinner. I had hit and miss results with Acetone.
It seems the moon has something to do with how the paint goes through an airbrush. Sometimes it spits and comes out in little chunks. I don't know why this happens, even with their thinner. But to get it to flow right, I've found that I have to thin it so much that it takes the whole bottle to get half way coverage on a project. Total waste of money and time. Thank goodness the air is free.
Sometimes the sheen is shiny, sometimes it's acceptable. Maddening.
Yesterday, I was working on an S-scale wooden depot for a friend. I sealed the walls so that it wouldn't take multiple bottles just to get a decent coat of paint. The thing looked more like stucco after trying Tru Color Buff. No matter what the p.s.i. was set at, I couldn't get good results. Since the company is in my state, I'm going to go down there and sit in the lobby until they show me their paint works.
I picked up some Scalecoat II at Caboose Hobbies last summer. Wasn't thrilled with the results of that either.
"Floquil, why have you forsaken me?!?!"
Sincerly,
Frustrated Painter


I have been using Xylene to thin Tru Color evfer since it came out just as I used of for Accu-Paint, both coming from the same original supplier. I've also used Scalecoat for fifty years last year and was happy as heck to see Floquil go out of business as I was tired of detail hiding primers and paper towel, or "stucco" as you called it, finishes. With either Tru-Color or Scalecoat I would recommend 25 lbs. of air pressure and then try adjusting the amount of paint you are spraying through the nozzle. If you are still not happy tyr going up to 30 psi and adjusting spray again. I also wonder if you might have a humidity problem but you ave not indicated anything
that would lead on to suspect that.

Good luck, Don Valentine


riverman_vt@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <sandbear75@...> wrote :

I spent yesterday wailing and gnashing my teeth trying to get Tru Color to behave properly. Fail. I don't want to sound like a Negative Nellie, but I'm tired of fighting a losing battle. That being said, let me share some thoughts.
Xylene works as a thinner. I had hit and miss results with Acetone.
It seems the moon has something to do with how the paint goes through an airbrush. Sometimes it spits and comes out in little chunks. I don't know why this happens, even with their thinner. But to get it to flow right, I've found that I have to thin it so much that it takes the whole bottle to get half way coverage on a project. Total waste of money and time. Thank goodness the air is free.
Sometimes the sheen is shiny, sometimes it's acceptable. Maddening.
Yesterday, I was working on an S-scale wooden depot for a friend. I sealed the walls so that it wouldn't take multiple bottles just to get a decent coat of paint. The thing looked more like stucco after trying Tru Color Buff. No matter what the p.s.i. was set at, I couldn't get good results. Since the company is in my state, I'm going to go down there and sit in the lobby until they show me their paint works.
I picked up some Scalecoat II at Caboose Hobbies last summer. Wasn't thrilled with the results of that either.
"Floquil, why have you forsaken me?!?!"
Sincerly,
Frustrated Painter


I have been using Xylene to thin Tru Color evfer since it came out just as I used of for Accu-Paint, both coming from the same original supplier. I've also used Scalecoat for fifty years last year and was happy as heck to see Floquil go out of business as I was tired of detail hiding primers and paper towel, or "stucco" as you called it, finishes. With either Tru-Color or Scalecoat I would recommend 25 lbs. of air pressure and then try adjusting the amount of paint you are spraying through the nozzle. If you are still not happy tyr going up to 30 psi and adjusting spray again. I also wonder if you might have a humidity problem but you ave not indicated anything
that would lead on to suspect that.

Good luck, Don Valentine


Bill Vaughn
 

What do you use as a primer, I have had no luck.

Bill Vaughn


On Thursday, January 18, 2018 1:50 PM, "Nelson Moyer npmoyer@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
I’ve never had “chunks” out of the airbrush with Tru Color. I mix thoroughly, but I haven’t needed to filter yet, but all my painting so far has started with a new bottle. Tru Color doesn’t like humidity. I paint only when the relative humidity is below 60%. The paint has to go on very slightly wet at the center of the spray pattern, and you have to overlap the wet part with subsequent passes. Light passes are best, and let it dry between coats. Spraying too thick and too close will cause it to run, as with any paint. Tru Color takes some getting used to! Adherence is a problem unless you prime before painting.
 
My only problem has been random lint on the painted surface. I think I’ve traced it to my sweatshirt. From now on, I’ll paint in a short sleeve shirt that has a hard finish.
 
Nelson Moyer
 
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2018 2:11 PM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tru-color paint
 
 
I spent yesterday wailing and gnashing my teeth trying to get Tru Color to behave properly. Fail. I don't want to sound like a Negative Nellie, but I'm tired of fighting a losing battle. That being said, let me share some thoughts.
Xylene works as a thinner. I had hit and miss results with Acetone.
It seems the moon has something to do with how the paint goes through an airbrush. Sometimes it spits and comes out in little chunks. I don't know why this happens, even with their thinner. But to get it to flow right, I've found that I have to thin it so much that it takes the whole bottle to get half way coverage on a project. Total waste of money and time. Thank goodness the air is free.
Sometimes the sheen is shiny, sometimes it's acceptable. Maddening.
Yesterday, I was working on an S-scale wooden depot for a friend. I sealed the walls so that it wouldn't take multiple bottles just to get a decent coat of paint. The thing looked more like stucco after trying Tru Color Buff. No matter what the p.s.i. was set at, I couldn't get good results. Since the company is in my state, I'm going to go down there and sit in the lobby until they show me their paint works.
I picked up some Scalecoat II at Caboose Hobbies last summer. Wasn't thrilled with the results of that either.
"Floquil, why have you forsaken me?!?!"
Sincerly,
Frustrated Painter



A&Y Dave in MD
 

Nelson,

My local hobby shop owner told me he was given a bottle of thinner by the Tru Color people to top off bottles where evaporation happened, so it's a known problem.  When I'm paying $5 for a small jar of paint, I shouldn't have to top off with a thinner that costs me as well!  I have been transferring the paint to glass jars with metal lids and haven't lost any volume. However, if they want me to keep buying it, they better fix that problem at the source, pronto.

Dave

Thursday, January 18, 2018, 2:48:19 PM, you wrote:


 
I called Tru Color to ask the same question and was told that acetone was a relatively minor ingredient in the thinner and there are several others ingredients. They don’t recommend thinning paint with Acetone, but Acetone is fine for cleanup. Of course, they sell a pint of thinner for $43.95, so why wouldn’t they say that. Apparently, thinning with acetone alone changes the handling and drying characteristics of the paint, particularly the shiny finish.
 
Jon, your question raised other questions. Why do you want to thin the paint? Tru Color claims it’s ready to spray without thinning, and I’ve painted ten cars so far shooting straight paint at 20 psi with a gravity feed airbrush. I think thinning would require more coats than straight paint. I’m curious, how many modelers thin vs. not thin, and how many coats do you average for thinned vs not thinned?
 
One problem I’ve noticed with Tru Color is that the bottle caps aren’t always tight on the shelves, and I’ve had evaporative losses up to 3-4 ml. per bottle before I caught it. I don’t know if the caps weren’t tightened properly at the plant, or the worked loose due to temperature changes, but I suspect I’ve had some of both. I brought up the new bottles to full volume with Tru Color thinner, then really tightened the caps hard. So far, I haven’t had additional evaporative loss. Now I always check the volume, add thinner if necessary, and tighten the cap on all new bottles.
 
Nelson Moyer
 
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2018 12:11 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Tru-color paint
 
 
    Not having quick access to thinner is acetone* an acceptable thinner?  For the paint cup only or to be added to the jar?
 
* or would MEK be better?
--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems,
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS



--
David Bott

Sent from David Bott's desktop PC


Nelson Moyer
 

I’ve been using Tamiya Fine Light Gray Primer.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2018 9:26 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tru-color paint

 

 

What do you use as a primer, I have had no luck.

 

Bill Vaughn

 


Steven Nelson <snelson33@...>
 

It could be a problem not associated with the paint (incorrect nozzle size, bent needle, spray distance and/or air pressure).