tiny electric drills


Tim O'Connor
 

I came across this item (and many other similar drills) on Ebay and
wondered if anyone has experience with them. Will they hold a #80 drill
bit?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/322900806461

Tim O'Connor


Jack Mullen
 

Tim,

Haven't tried any of these but for a few bucks, I might experiment. Low expectations go with the low price. This quote from the listing for one of the similar items is suggestive:

Note: this drill chuck need to be applicable to different specifications, so after you install a drill well ,it require careful adjustment to concentric, if not adjust ,the drill bit will not concentric.
Adjustment method: First, loosen the drill chuck, then slightly tightened, then make the drill close to sth similar to glass,then it will correction itself and tighten the drill chuck, need calibration after each time you change the drill bit.

Jack Mullen


Bill Welch
 

At that price one could buy two or three and put a #80 in one, #79 in another and so on and just leave that way.

Bill Welch


Nelson Moyer
 

Should work for resin, but wouldn’t 13,000 rpm melt plastic?

 

Nelson  Moyer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, February 08, 2018 2:04 PM
To: stmfc@...; resinfreightcars@...
Subject: [STMFC] tiny electric drills

 

 


I came across this item (and many other similar drills) on Ebay and
wondered if anyone has experience with them. Will they hold a #80 drill
bit?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/322900806461

Tim O'Connor


Charles Peck
 

Slowing it down might be a good use for a TYCO power pack. 
Also, the one I looked at said 
  • "Clamping Diameter: 0.8-1.5mm"
  • That looks like minimum size about #68 up to about #53.  Not a big range but perhaps a better chuck could 
  • be fitted.  And perhaps a better motor could be fitted to the better chuck.
  • Five ax handles and two heads later, Granddads ax is as good as ever.
  • Chuck Peck

On Thu, Feb 8, 2018 at 6:38 PM, Nelson Moyer npmoyer@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Should work for resin, but wouldn’t 13,000 rpm melt plastic?

 

Nelson  Moyer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, February 08, 2018 2:04 PM
To: stmfc@...; resinfreightcars@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] tiny electric drills

 

 


I came across this item (and many other similar drills) on Ebay and
wondered if anyone has experience with them. Will they hold a #80 drill
bit?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/322900806461

Tim O'Connor



 

Something tells me it’s just the brass collet, not including the motor. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Feb 8, 2018, at 5:38 PM, Nelson Moyer npmoyer@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Should work for resin, but wouldn’t 13,000 rpm melt plastic?

 

Nelson  Moyer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, February 08, 2018 2:04 PM
To: stmfc@...; resinfreightcars@...
Subject: [STMFC] tiny electric drills

 

 


I came across this item (and many other similar drills) on Ebay and
wondered if anyone has experience with them. Will they hold a #80 drill
bit?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/322900806461

Tim O'Connor


Tim O'Connor
 

Bill

Good point! And after I posted I remembered you can buy packages of
very small drill bits with large shanks, so the issue of the chuck isn't
important. I have a dozen pre-loaded pin vises that probably cost me MORE
than a dozen of these little drill motors would cost! :-) And yeah I use
an MRC power pack for my Brazleton drill press, so these will work fine
with leads and alligator clips...

Tim


At that price one could buy two or three and put a #80 in one, #79 in another and so on and just leave that way. Bill Welch


Tim O'Connor
 


Brian which part of the description did you miss?

"Feature: - It includes a motor, a drill clamp and a 1mm drill, perfect for PCB drilling."



Something tells me it's just the brass collet, not including the motor.
Thanks!
Brian Ehni


Peter Hall
 

Does anyone have a drill motor this size powered by a battery?  It would be nice to have one without a cord.

Pete

On Feb 8, 2018, at 7:24 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Bill

Good point! And after I posted I remembered you can buy packages of
very small drill bits with large shanks, so the issue of the chuck isn't
important. I have a dozen pre-loaded pin vises that probably cost me MORE
than a dozen of these little drill motors would cost! :-) And yeah I use
an MRC power pack for my Brazleton drill press, so these will work fine
with leads and alligator clips...

Tim


At that price one could buy two or three and put a #80 in one, #79 in another and so on and just leave that way. Bill Welch



Charles Peck
 

I had one years ago. Had, I think, two C cells and a weak little motor. A few small holes in soft wood
and the battery was done.  The Dremel was cheaper than a gross of batteries. 
Chuck Peck

On Thu, Feb 8, 2018 at 8:34 PM, Peter Hall petehall6369@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Does anyone have a drill motor this size powered by a battery?  It would be nice to have one without a cord.


Pete

On Feb 8, 2018, at 7:24 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Bill

Good point! And after I posted I remembered you can buy packages of
very small drill bits with large shanks, so the issue of the chuck isn't
important. I have a dozen pre-loaded pin vises that probably cost me MORE
than a dozen of these little drill motors would cost! :-) And yeah I use
an MRC power pack for my Brazleton drill press, so these will work fine
with leads and alligator clips...

Tim


At that price one could buy two or three and put a #80 in one, #79 in another and so on and just leave that way. Bill Welch




Tim O'Connor
 

Pete

LOL - I guess you could duct tape a rechargeable 9v battery to the motor.
But then you'll need an on/off switch too... :-D (Now we know why Micromark
gets more $$ for their product.)

You have to understand - what I like about these tiny drills is their tiny-ness.
Really easy to hold - and actually easy to lock into a vise and move the workpiece
instead of the drill.

Tim O'


Does anyone have a drill motor this size powered by a battery?  It would be nice to have one without a cord.

Pete

On Feb 8, 2018, at 7:24 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Bill

Good point! And after I posted I remembered you can buy packages of
very small drill bits with large shanks, so the issue of the chuck isn't
important. I have a dozen pre-loaded pin vises that probably cost me MORE
than a dozen of these little drill motors would cost! :-) And yeah I use
an MRC power pack for my Brazleton drill press, so these will work fine
with leads and alligator clips...

Tim


At that price one could buy two or three and put a #80 in one, #79 in another and so on and just leave that way. Bill Welch


Douglas Harding
 

As a kid building models I could not afford a Dremel, but X-acto made a battery operated that sold for about $6. (This was the late 60s). It was a poor substitute with a small 3 volt motor with a gear reduction head that had a pin vise style chuck. It was in a metal flash light case and took two C size batteries. It had no power. I soon stripped the case from the motor and connected it to a 6 volt lantern battery. That gave it a lot more umph, but boy was it noisy. I eventually got a Dremel thanks to my wife.

 

Now I have a pair of Dremel Model 750 4.8V cordless drills. Recently had the battery packs rebuilt with new cells as Dremel no longer sells replacement batteries for them. One is equipped with a keyless chuck. They are great for drilling a quick hole in a freight car or work on the layout.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, February 8, 2018 8:28 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: tiny electric drills

 

 

I had one years ago. Had, I think, two C cells and a weak little motor. A few small holes in soft wood

and the battery was done.  The Dremel was cheaper than a gross of batteries. 

Chuck Peck

 

On Thu, Feb 8, 2018 at 8:34 PM, Peter Hall petehall6369@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Does anyone have a drill motor this size powered by a battery?  It would be nice to have one without a cord.

 

Pete



On Feb 8, 2018, at 7:24 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Bill

Good point! And after I posted I remembered you can buy packages of
very small drill bits with large shanks, so the issue of the chuck isn't
important. I have a dozen pre-loaded pin vises that probably cost me MORE
than a dozen of these little drill motors would cost! :-) And yeah I use
an MRC power pack for my Brazleton drill press, so these will work fine
with leads and alligator clips...

Tim

At that price one could buy two or three and put a #80 in one, #79 in another and so on and just leave that way. Bill Welch

 

 

 


Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 2/8/2018 6:34 PM, Peter Hall petehall6369@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Does anyone have a drill motor this size powered by a battery?  It would be nice to have one without a cord.


Yes, MicroMark sells a cordless screwdriver ( two AAA batteries) and a chuck. Because it's a screwdriver, it drills slowly. I have been drilling grab iron holes with a #79 bit and so far have broken only one bit (six cars). I suspect the bit broke because it became dull and seized up. I suppose I should use bees wax. Because all that is moving is slight pressure on the car towards the bit, there is no wobble such as you get with a pin vice. Here are the product numbers for MicroMark:

# 86258    Screwdriver
# 86259    Chuck

Spen Kellogg


Peter Hall
 

I use liquid detergent.  Dip the drill bit into the liquid, then drill one hole at a time.  It works well.  As long as I’ve practiced this technique, I have not broken even 0.3mm carbide bits, which have no tolerance for sideways movement.

Thanks
Pete

On Feb 8, 2018, at 11:15 PM, Spen Kellogg spninetynine@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


On 2/8/2018 6:34 PM, Peter Hall petehall6369@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Does anyone have a drill motor this size powered by a battery?  It would be nice to have one without a cord.


Yes, MicroMark sells a cordless screwdriver ( two AAA batteries) and a chuck. Because it's a screwdriver, it drills slowly. I have been drilling grab iron holes with a #79 bit and so far have broken only one bit (six cars). I suspect the bit broke because it became dull and seized up. I suppose I should use bees wax. Because all that is moving is slight pressure on the car towards the bit, there is no wobble such as you get with a pin vice. Here are the product numbers for MicroMark:

# 86258    Screwdriver
# 86259    Chuck

Spen Kellogg



Jim Betz
 

Hi,

  I have one of these (it just arrived 2 days ago).  I have mounted a small
drill in it and hooked it up to a DC power pack and it runs very smooth.
The instructions that came with mine say to put the drill in the chuck
and -then- put the chuck on the motor.
  I have not tried to drill anything (of consequence) ... yet.
- Jim B.


Jim Betz
 

Hi again,

  I just did some additional testing of mine.

  1) The chuck wants to spin on the motor shaft.  I suggest filing
       a little flat area on the motor shaft for the set screw to grab.
       I slid the chuck down quite far onto the motor shaft - but
       not far enough that it contacted/rubbed on the motor case.

  2) The motor responds well to speed control - just using an MRC power pack.
       My guesstimate is that it was turning about 1000 rpm at its slowest (slower?).

  3) The chuck turns very smoothly (it is not off center - at all).

  4) I was able to chuck up a #71 drill bit, didn't try anything smaller (yet).

  5) I did not experience any turning of the drill bit in the chuck.  The testing
      I've done so far has been in wood (actually a round golf scoring pencil).
      It would not surprise me to find that the drill will turn inside the chuck
      if the bit 'grabs' (such as when drilling Zamac).

  6) The eBay seller I bought mine from is fcb_electronics.  The item was
       shipped to me (from the Far East) -very- quickly (a few days, less than a
       week).

  This appears to be a "useful tool" and I will probably convert over to
using it for many of the holes I drill using a pin vise.  
                                                                                                   - Jim B.


Steve Caple <stevecaple@...>
 

Should work for resin, but wouldn’t 13,000 rpm melt plastic?  
(Nelson Moyer)


What e really need is something like a Dremel but with 50 - 500 rpm, not 30,000


Ken Adams <smadanek@...>
 

Agree with Steve Caple!

A low speed (50-500 RPM), cordless drill would be ideal for the type of drilling we do in resin and plastic. 

Ken Adams


Charles Peck
 

I do not know the speed of them but Micromark offers a battery powered "precision power screwdriver"
and an optional chuck that claims to hold down to 1/64" so it should be good for #78.
These might be slow enough as I wouldn't have much use for a 1000 RPM with a 1/16" blade screwdriver
bit. 
Anybody have one of these to give us a report?
Chuck Peck

On Mon, Feb 12, 2018 at 6:00 PM, Ken Adams smadanek@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Agree with Steve Caple!

A low speed (50-500 RPM), cordless drill would be ideal for the type of drilling we do in resin and plastic. 

Ken Adams



Peter Hall
 

I have one.  It runs at 100 RPM, which is a little slow for drilling small holes, 500 would be better.  At such as slow speed, the change of breaking the bit is high.  Also, the optional chuck is a bit large for our purposes - I’d prefer one of those small brass chucks to hold small drills.  

However, the MM “screwdriver” with the chuck and a reduced-shank drill bit like a 0.3mm carbide with a 1/8 shank does a nice job of drilling pilot holes.  I drilled a  lot of pilot holes with a pin vise, only to find out they are not perfectly where I want them due to wandering.  

The MM assembly is accurate, and a slow drill bit is what you want when drilling pilot holes for stirrup steps and grab irons in resin kits.  Then I follow it with a Dremel flex-tool with the same 0.3mm bit set on about 1000 rpm.  Dip the drill in liquid detergent, find the pilot holes, and drill as many as you like very accurately.

Thanks
Pete

On Feb 12, 2018, at 6:17 PM, Charles Peck lnnrr152@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


I do not know the speed of them but Micromark offers a battery powered "precision power screwdriver"
and an optional chuck that claims to hold down to 1/64" so it should be good for #78.
These might be slow enough as I wouldn't have much use for a 1000 RPM with a 1/16" blade screwdriver
bit. 
Anybody have one of these to give us a report?
Chuck Peck

On Mon, Feb 12, 2018 at 6:00 PM, Ken Adams smadanek@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Agree with Steve Caple!

A low speed (50-500 RPM), cordless drill would be ideal for the type of drilling we do in resin and plastic. 

Ken Adams