Topics

Salt Tank Cars


thecitrusbelt@...
 

This 1926 builder's photo is from the Indiana Historical Society website:

 

http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16797coll21/id/94/rec/616

 

I imagine these cars carried various salt compounds. To my eye they look a bit like steel versions of vinegar tank cars with wooden tanks.

 

What else is known about such cars?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 

P.S.: Someone else first pointed out the Indiana Historical Society website so many thanks to that person.


Bruce Smith
 

Bob,

I’m not sure if you’re trying to say that these are have steel tanks. If you are then I believe that you are incorrect.  If you examine the photograph very carefully, it is clear that the tanks are wood.  Thus, they are (nearly) identical to the vinegar tank cars and that makes a lot of sense.  I also note that they appear to be be style with 2 tanks per car.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Mar 9, 2018, at 10:31 AM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

This 1926 builder's photo is from the Indiana Historical Society website:
I imagine these cars carried various salt compounds. To my eye they look a bit like steel versions of vinegar tank cars with wooden tanks.
What else is known about such cars?
Bob Chaparro


Ted Schnepf
 

Hello,

Are these cars longer than 40 foot?  Maybe the camera angle makes the cars look long.  What are the reporting marks?

Was salt mined in the Cincinnati area?

ted


At 11:45 AM 3/9/2018, you wrote:


Bob,

I’m not sure if you’re trying to say that these are have steel tanks. If you are then I believe that you are incorrect.  If you examine the photograph very carefully, it is clear that the tanks are wood.  Thus, they are (nearly) identical to the vinegar tank cars and that makes a lot of sense.  I also note that they appear to be be style with 2 tanks per car.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith           

Auburn, AL
"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Mar 9, 2018, at 10:31 AM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

This 1926 builder's photo is from the Indiana Historical Society website:
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16797coll21/id/94/rec/616
I imagine these cars carried various salt compounds. To my eye they look a bit like steel versions of vinegar tank cars with wooden tanks.
What else is known about such cars?
Bob Chaparro


Rails Unlimited
Ted Schnepf
railsunl@...
847-697-5353
126 Will Scarlet
Elgin, Ill. 60120
http://RailsUnlimited.ribbonrail.com/

Model Railroad Sales and Service with
a personal touch.
Books new and used.  HO and O scales.
DCC supplies. O scale urethane cars.
Photos and darkroom services.
Checks, cash (0%) or credit (secure server at web site 5% added).


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Schuyler Larrabee
 

These cars are quite interesting. Note the lengthy platforms at the ends of the cars.



I agree, Bruce, wood tanks.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...>
Sent: Friday, March 09, 2018 12:46 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Salt Tank Cars





Bob,



I’m not sure if you’re trying to say that these are have steel tanks. If you are then I believe that you are incorrect. If you examine the photograph very carefully, it is clear that the tanks are wood. Thus, they are (nearly) identical to the vinegar tank cars and that makes a lot of sense. I also note that they appear to be be style with 2 tanks per car.



Regards

Bruce



Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."









On Mar 9, 2018, at 10:31 AM, thecitrusbelt@... <mailto:thecitrusbelt@...> [STMFC] <STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC@...> > wrote:





This 1926 builder's photo is from the Indiana Historical Society website:

<http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16797coll21/id/94/rec/616> http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16797coll21/id/94/rec/616

I imagine these cars carried various salt compounds. To my eye they look a bit like steel versions of vinegar tank cars with wooden tanks.

What else is known about such cars?

Bob Chaparro


Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Ted,
 
You wrote: “Are these cars longer than 40 foot?”
 
I thought so too.  Assuming an 8’ wheelbase for the trucks, it looks like a 50’ car, or perhaps longer, but isn’t 1926 a bit early for even a 50’ car?
 
I have one of the Northeastern vinegar tank car kits that looks like it will build into a 40’ car (The instructions are completely without dimensions.), but the tank proportion are such that they appear to be much shorter tanks and they appear to sit much closer to the car’s ends.  The capacity stenciling on these cars indicates they are 40 ton cars, while the capacity of the Northeastern kit’s car is 50 tons!  I would have expected the capacities to be the other way around.  Curious.
 
It is interesting also that the banners on the cars’ sides read “Built by Hauser-Stander Tank Co.” while stencils on the cars’ sides read “Built by Cincinnati Car Co.”  Does that mean that the tanks were built by Hauser-Stander and the remainder of the car was built by CCC, or was Hauser-Stander a subsidiary of CCC?
 
The reporting marks are “MYSX,” apparently for Myles Salt. 
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

 
 
* * *


On Mar 9, 2018, at 10:31 AM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

This 1926 builder's photo is from the Indiana Historical Society website:
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16797coll21/id/94/rec/616
I imagine these cars carried various salt compounds. To my eye they look a bit like steel versions of vinegar tank cars with wooden tanks.
What else is known about such cars?
Bob Chaparro


Rails Unlimited
Ted Schnepf
railsunl@...
847-697-5353
126 Will Scarlet
Elgin, Ill. 60120


Denny Anspach
 

Although the tanks look like steel, I think they are just carefully finished tight wood tanks. Why would they have all of the rings common only to wood tanks?

Also, salt will not eat wood, while it surely eats steel. Think: bulk salt and salted hides were only shipped to/from the midwestern packing houses in wood cars, most notably single sheathed cars at life’s end, or even wood reefers, because steel cars would last only a few months in such service. Ditto brined pickles, etc. in wood tanks.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864


Pieter Roos
 

Why would you assume 8' wheelbase on the trucks? Most freight trucks are 5' or 5'6", some arch bar trucks were shorter.

Pieter Roos


Pieter Roos
 

If you blow the photo up (there is a size option at the top), the wood planks are quite visible in the tanks, as well as the bands with the same type fasteners used on wood water tanks.

The car frames appear to be steel, with a wood deck. They may not have last long, if there was a lot of salt spillage/leakage onto the frame.

Pieter Roos
Connecticut


Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Pieter,
 
My bad.  I was thinking of 4-wheel passenger trucks rather than arch bar freight trucks.
 
Still, it makes for a car considerably longer than 40 feet.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532
 

From: pieterroos53@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2018 3:49 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Salt Tank Cars
 
 

Why would you assume 8' wheelbase on the trucks? Most freight trucks are 5' or 5'6", some arch bar trucks were shorter.

Pieter Roos


Pieter Roos
 

You may be right, although looking at the sill steps and the K brake in the center of the car it isn't clear to me that the proportions are different from a standard 40' car. I know there are ways to work that out, but I'm not proficient at them.

What is also interesting is that the handbrake chain appears to pass to the OUTSIDE of the nearest truck to the photographer. An odd routing, except on cars intended for very tight curves like the Pacific Electric boxcars.

Pieter Roos
Connecticut


Mark Charles
 

It looks like Myles Salt (aka Gunther Salt) was shipped by rail from Louisiana to St. Louis until the 1930s. (https://www.gunthersalt.com/our-history/)

As Pieter suggests, maybe the cars were "...intended for very tight curves" at the destination.

Mark Charles
Ann Arbor, Mich. USA


gnryfan
 

Denny: I agree. If you blow the pic WAY up, you can see the planking and fastening holes at the ends, so it is definitely wood..  And you're correct about all the fastener rings.  Those wouldn't be needed on steel - but the paint IS really shiny, so it sorta looks like steel at first view.
Joe Berger
Great Northern Railway (HO)
Cascade Division