Topics

Wabash War Emergency Boxcar Part Five

Bill Welch
 

When assembling the brake system on a house car my goal is to make it look accurate when viewed from the side and take as a given it is always in shadow. I want to be able to "see through" places where there should be daylight like the chain links, rods, and clevices and that components are generally the correct shape and in the correct place. When viewed from the bottom of the car I don't much care how it looks.

Here are photos of the "AB" brake system on my Wabash WE car, all pretty typical for the way I do things. I do not routinely install a train line but on a whim I did here. I could not find my .015 styrene rod so I used .020. Because of the way I pin the chain to the brake lever and my use of shaved down Tichy turnbuckles as clevices I like using .010 x .060 strip styrene to make the two brake levers so I can use Tester's or Tamiya to secure the clevices and levers together. I chose to use the kit's brake cylinder, reservoir, and AB Valve to which I attached a Tichy Dirt Collector, a part I only recently started installing. I use .012 brass wire for the rods and coincidentally the Tichy turnbuckles are cored for .012 wire. After taking the photos I realized I have not attached NBWs to the Reservoir to make it appear it is bolted in place. I will do this w/Tichy NBWs. While I like the way my chain droops I think I need 2-3 fewer links.

Please let me know if you have questions.

Bill Welch

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Bill, your .020 rod for the train line is actually the correct size.  And yes, you do need fewer links in that chain, and if you can find some prototype photos that show this, you may find that some of them should be longer, oval links.  As it is, it would benefit from gently squeezing the links you have to make them less round and more oval.

 

From the prototype drawings I’ve acquired from ACF, the chain typically seems to have one link about 5-6” long at each end, plus another in the middle with perhaps two shorter links, 3-4”,  joining everything together.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill Welch
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 2:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Wabash War Emergency Boxcar Part Five

 

When assembling the brake system on a house car my goal is to make it look accurate when viewed from the side and take as a given it is always in shadow. I want to be able to "see through" places where there should be daylight like the chain links, rods, and clevices and that components are generally the correct shape and in the correct place. When viewed from the bottom of the car I don't much care how it looks.

Here are photos of the "AB" brake system on my Wabash WE car, all pretty typical for the way I do things. I do not routinely install a train line but on a whim I did here. I could not find my .015 styrene rod so I used .020. Because of the way I pin the chain to the brake lever and my use of shaved down Tichy turnbuckles as clevices I like using .010 x .060 strip styrene to make the two brake levers so I can use Tester's or Tamiya to secure the clevices and levers together. I chose to use the kit's brake cylinder, reservoir, and AB Valve to which I attached a Tichy Dirt Collector, a part I only recently started installing. I use .012 brass wire for the rods and coincidentally the Tichy turnbuckles are cored for .012 wire. After taking the photos I realized I have not attached NBWs to the Reservoir to make it appear it is bolted in place. I will do this w/Tichy NBWs. While I like the way my chain droops I think I need 2-3 fewer links.

Please let me know if you have questions.

Bill Welch

Bill Welch
 

I am aware of all of this Schuyler. I will be sending all of my models to you to squeeze the chain, say fifty at a time.

Bill Welch

James E Kubanick
 

Bill,

Thanks for showing us how you do your AB brake systems. It does raise a question, though. Your chain appears to be rigid as it droops upward in the upside-down shots. Is this a solid chain, or did you, somehow, stiffen a length of standard chain to form the droop? The effect looks good.

Jim Kubanick
Morgantown WV.


On Sunday, July 15, 2018 2:30 PM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:


When assembling the brake system on a house car my goal is to make it look accurate when viewed from the side and take as a given it is always in shadow. I want to be able to "see through" places where there should be daylight like the chain links, rods, and clevices and that components are generally the correct shape and in the correct place. When viewed from the bottom of the car I don't much care how it looks.

Here are photos of the "AB" brake system on my Wabash WE car, all pretty typical for the way I do things. I do not routinely install a train line but on a whim I did here. I could not find my .015 styrene rod so I used .020. Because of the way I pin the chain to the brake lever and my use of shaved down Tichy turnbuckles as clevices I like using .010 x .060 strip styrene to make the two brake levers so I can use Tester's or Tamiya to secure the clevices and levers together. I chose to use the kit's brake cylinder, reservoir, and AB Valve to which I attached a Tichy Dirt Collector, a part I only recently started installing. I use .012 brass wire for the rods and coincidentally the Tichy turnbuckles are cored for .012 wire. After taking the photos I realized I have not attached NBWs to the Reservoir to make it appear it is bolted in place. I will do this w/Tichy NBWs. While I like the way my chain droops I think I need 2-3 fewer links.

Please let me know if you have questions.

Bill Welch


Fred Jansz
 

Hi Bill,
Also visible from the side are the release levers, sometimes accentuated by white half-circle markings on the sides of the car.
And when I'm in the mood (...) I also add the release pipe from the B-end to the AB valve.
However, when I do this, I get shot by the community of rivet counters for doing so 'because nobody will notice it's there'.
cheers from sunny Holland,
Fred Jansz

Bruce Smith
 

Fred,


Any "rivet counter" who pop-pooed your addition of the release lever, isn't a real rivet coutner ;)


Regards, and proud to be a rivet counter

Bruce Smith

Auburn AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Fred Jansz <fred@...>
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 5:04 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Wabash War Emergency Boxcar Part Five
 
Hi Bill,
Also visible from the side are the release levers, sometimes accentuated by white half-circle markings on the sides of the car.
And when I'm in the mood (...) I also add the release pipe from the B-end to the AB valve.
However, when I do this, I get shot by the community of rivet counters for doing so 'because nobody will notice it's there'.
cheers from sunny Holland,
Fred Jansz

Tony Thompson
 

Bruce Smith wrote:

Any "rivet counter" who pop-pooed your addition of the release lever, isn't a real rivet coutner ;)
Regards, and proud to be a rivet counter

      Well, yes, rivets count.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Dennis Storzek
 

Bill, 
You've done a wonderful job of replicating the rods, clevises, and chain, but you need to up your game when it comes to the Brake Lever Falcrum, where the floating lever pivot is attached to the center sill. It doesn't just hang on a bolt retained by a square nit :-(

Here is the simplest attachment, from a NYC drawing published in the 1922 CBC. This Hat shaped piece of bar stock rivets to a plate attached to the bottom of the sill, so the lever is supported and the pivot pin has bearing both above and below the lever. The plate normally offsets the pin hole either inside or outside the sill, so the pin can be inserted from above.

The next level of complexity is an elongated carrier with multiple holes, so that slack due to brake shoe wear can be taken up here rather than under the truck, which is harder to reach. Beyond that is the various automatic slack adjusters such as the Royal F.

Dennis Storzek
This

Bill Welch
 

Two questions Dennis, was there supposed to be an attachment illustrating your point?

What does what you describe look like when viewed in profile in the darkness of the underside of a car?

Bill Welch

Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 09:18 AM, Bill Welch wrote:
Two questions Dennis, was there supposed to be an attachment illustrating your point?
The embedded drawing didn't come through? I don't read the list via e-mail, and the images show up just fine on the group web page. Check and see if you don't have a file named "Brake Lever Falcrum.jpg. in your embedded folder. If not, let me know and I can attach this drawing and the brake wheel to an e-mail.
What does what you describe look like when viewed in profile in the darkness of the underside of a car?
It looks like the strap shown wrapped under the end of the lever, eith the end of the pin sticking out, no nut. From the side it's not obvious if it's directly under the sill rather than a bit to the side.

Dennis Storzek

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Nothing came through on the email and the most recent photo attachment on the website is the brake wheel drawing.
 
Steve Hile



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 12:44 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Wabash War Emergency Boxcar Part Five

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 09:18 AM, Bill Welch wrote:
Two questions Dennis, was there supposed to be an attachment illustrating your point?
The embedded drawing didn't come through? I don't read the list via e-mail, and the images show up just fine on the group web page. Check and see if you don't have a file named "Brake Lever Falcrum.jpg. in your embedded folder. If not, let me know and I can attach this drawing and the brake wheel to an e-mail.
What does what you describe look like when viewed in profile in the darkness of the underside of a car?
It looks like the strap shown wrapped under the end of the lever, eith the end of the pin sticking out, no nut. From the side it's not obvious if it's directly under the sill rather than a bit to the side.

Dennis Storzek

Dennis Storzek
 

Well, let me try this again. I did this one right after the brake wheel, but did have some trouble... Here goes again:

steve_wintner
 

I can see the second attempt Dennis.

Robert kirkham
 

So I suspect I know the answer to this question, but just how much magnification do you need to do this kind of work?  And what jigs to drill the small holes in parts for each “pipe”. 

 

Taking the time is one thing, but just getting the tools to bite in the right location and make useful holes . . .   Looks like quite the challenge.  All hand work, or using a rotary tool?

 

Love what you are accomplishing Bill!

 

Rob

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill Welch
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 11:20 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Wabash War Emergency Boxcar Part Five

 

When assembling the brake system on a house car my goal is to make it look accurate when viewed from the side and take as a given it is always in shadow. I want to be able to "see through" places where there should be daylight like the chain links, rods, and clevices and that components are generally the correct shape and in the correct place. When viewed from the bottom of the car I don't much care how it looks.

Here are photos of the "AB" brake system on my Wabash WE car, all pretty typical for the way I do things. I do not routinely install a train line but on a whim I did here. I could not find my .015 styrene rod so I used .020. Because of the way I pin the chain to the brake lever and my use of shaved down Tichy turnbuckles as clevices I like using .010 x .060 strip styrene to make the two brake levers so I can use Tester's or Tamiya to secure the clevices and levers together. I chose to use the kit's brake cylinder, reservoir, and AB Valve to which I attached a Tichy Dirt Collector, a part I only recently started installing. I use .012 brass wire for the rods and coincidentally the Tichy turnbuckles are cored for .012 wire. After taking the photos I realized I have not attached NBWs to the Reservoir to make it appear it is bolted in place. I will do this w/Tichy NBWs. While I like the way my chain droops I think I need 2-3 fewer links.

Please let me know if you have questions.

Bill Welch

Bill Welch
 
Edited

Rob, my Optivisor has a pair of 3.5x lenses. I think it is cataloged as their #10. The Tichy Turnbuckles are already cored and the 0.012 wire fits well. I first use a small amount of Testors to position it on the end of the wire and after this has firmed up a little then I apply a small amount of CA with my applicator, an Insect Pin.

Attached is my only effort that I recall so far with a Slack Adjuster, it is on my model of Pullman built Monon #37. The bracket is a gift from friend George Toman. Not all railroads used these devices.

Bill Welch