Topics

Trucks


Jared Harper
 

What trucks go under the F&C SP A-50-5 and SP A-50-6 auto cars.  I looked in Hendrickson's SS box cars and auto cars but could not see the trucks clearly.

Thanks.

Jared Harper


Richard Brennan
 

At 04:53 PM 7/24/2018, Jared Harper wrote:
What trucks go under the F&C SP A-50-5 and SP A-50-6 auto cars. I looked in Hendrickson's SS box cars and auto cars but could not see the trucks clearly.
What era?
Southern Pacific Freight Cars Vol 3, Page 62 shows original circa-1923 Bettendorf T-section trucks...
but these got replaced later in life.


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


Tim O'Connor
 

They had the T-section trucks even as late as 1946.

When the cars were rebuilt as hog fuel (wood shavings) cars they appear
to have received AAR U-section trucks with spring planks.

At 04:53 PM 7/24/2018, Jared Harper wrote:
What trucks go under the F&C SP A-50-5 and SP A-50-6 auto cars. I looked in Hendrickson's SS box cars and auto cars but could not see the trucks clearly.
What era?
Southern Pacific Freight Cars Vol 3, Page 62 shows original circa-1923 Bettendorf T-section trucks...
but these got replaced later in life.

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


Andy Carlson
 

The TMW #009, Barber lateral motion was purchased in large amounts for both PFE and SP upgrades.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2018 9:25 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Trucks


They had the T-section trucks even as late as 1946.

When the cars were rebuilt as hog fuel (wood shavings) cars they appear
to have received AAR U-section trucks with spring planks.



>At 04:53 PM 7/24/2018, Jared Harper wrote:
>>What trucks go under the F&C SP A-50-5 and SP A-50-6 auto cars.  I looked in Hendrickson's SS box cars and auto cars but could not see the trucks clearly.
>
>What era?
>Southern Pacific Freight Cars Vol 3, Page 62 shows original circa-1923 Bettendorf T-section trucks...
>but these got replaced later in life.
>
>--------------------
>Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
>-------------------- 






Eric Hansmann
 

The I-, L-, and T-section trucks were banned on interchange cars as of January 1, 1957. The initial proposed deadline was January 1, 1949. The info is on the AAR Interchange Dates file in the file section and is attributed to Guy Wilber. I suspect SP wanted to use these in hog service for several years beyond the initial 1949 ban on the T-section trucks. Possibly they made the upgrades as the cars were rebuilt.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On July 24, 2018 at 10:24 PM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



They had the T-section trucks even as late as 1946.

When the cars were rebuilt as hog fuel (wood shavings) cars they appear
to have received AAR U-section trucks with spring planks.



>At 04:53 PM 7/24/2018, Jared Harper wrote:
>>What trucks go under the F&C SP A-50-5 and SP A-50-6 auto cars. I looked in Hendrickson's SS box cars and auto cars but could not see the trucks clearly.
>
>What era?
>Southern Pacific Freight Cars Vol 3, Page 62 shows original circa-1923 Bettendorf T-section trucks...
>but these got replaced later in life.
>
>--------------------
>Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
>--------------------




Ken Adams
 

Hog feed cars....a little late for my constraining period dates (1946-54) but what an interesting prototype....go hog wild on building a string....


Daniel A. Mitchell
 

I think that’s “Hog Fuel” not “Hog Feed” … it’s ground up wood chips and small chuunks from a sawmill or planing operation. It’s an ancestor of modern wood-chip cars. The “hog” is a big grinder that takes sawmill slash and grinds it up into “hog fuel”. Today we’re more likely to call them “chippers”. The term “hog fuel” also applies to small wood blocks and sticks, Such combustable stuf was commonly used as fuel for donkey engines and such.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Jul 25, 2018, at 3:00 PM, Ken Adams <smadanek44g@...> wrote:

Hog feed car


Tony Thompson
 

Hogs are still what really big chippers are called. Ask anyone in the forest products business. And machinists (remember them?) still hog parts out of stock.
Tony Thompson 

On Jul 25, 2018, at 12:00 PM, Ken Adams <smadanek44g@...> wrote:

Hog feed cars....a little late for my constraining period dates (1946-54) but what an interesting prototype....go hog wild on building a string....


Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Indeed. Any really heavy cut in metal or woodworking is often still called “hogging”.

Today there are also a bunch of big “hogs” mounted on semi-trailers that visit logging and demolition projects. The ground-up product is much easier to transport or dispose of 
than the raw material.

Dan Mitchell
retired machinist
=============

On Jul 25, 2018, at 4:16 PM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

Hogs are still what really big chippers are called. Ask anyone in the forest products business. And machinists (remember them?) still hog parts out of stock.
Tony Thompson 

On Jul 25, 2018, at 12:00 PM, Ken Adams <smadanek44g@...> wrote:

Hog feed cars....a little late for my constraining period dates (1946-54) but what an interesting prototype....go hog wild on building a string....


Tim O'Connor
 


Correct. I have a 1933 photo of Northern Pacific "hog fuel" cars (flat cars with
tall stake sides) loaded with chunks of wood, as well as a photo of NP gondolas
loaded with the much finer wood shavings.

Tim O'Connor


 I think that's Hog Fuel not Hog Feed. It's ground up wood chips and small chuunks from
 a sawmill or planing operation. It's an ancestor of modern wood-chip cars. The hog is a
 big grinder that takes sawmill slash and grinds it up into hog fuel. Today we're more likely
 to call them chippers. The term hog fuel also applies to small wood blocks and sticks. Such
 combustible stuf was commonly used as fuel for donkey engines and such.
 Dan Mitchell


Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Yes, and Great Northern had a bunch of such cars also, a couple types at least. They were converted boxcars much like the SP car shown earlier in this thread, but only 40’ or so long. The G.N. cars had the roof removed, and the sides replaced with (mostly) solid sheathing (no big door), but with several (4 or 5) smaller openings a few feet square near the bottom. These had wooden doors in the openings that hinged upward so the hog-fuel could be dumped beside the car.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Jul 25, 2018, at 7:33 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Correct. I have a 1933 photo of Northern Pacific "hog fuel" cars (flat cars with
tall stake sides) loaded with chunks of wood, as well as a photo of NP gondolas
loaded with the much finer wood shavings.

Tim O'Connor


 I think that's Hog Fuel not Hog Feed. It's ground up wood chips and small chuunks from
 a sawmill or planing operation. It's an ancestor of modern wood-chip cars. The hog is a
 big grinder that takes sawmill slash and grinds it up into hog fuel. Today we're more likely
 to call them chippers. The term hog fuel also applies to small wood blocks and sticks. Such
 combustible stuf was commonly used as fuel for donkey engines and such.
 Dan Mitchell


Ken Adams
 

Well there were at one time the LA garbage trains of slops to feed local pig farms....And here I grew up in Oregon and never heard that term as applied to lumber waste. Oh well.


Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Ken,

The SP operation used gondolas. We discussed this a year or so ago here, and were provided with several photos. They should be in our group's photo files somewhere.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

On 7/26/18 2:24 PM, Ken Adams wrote:
Well there were at one time the LA garbage trains of slops to feed local pig farms....And here I grew up in Oregon and never heard that term as applied to lumber waste. Oh well.