Reefers: Heaters


Walter
 

Bill Welch,

Funny you mentioned removing ice before installing heaters. A empty reefer was set for loading. The car was then loaded with 40,000 pounds of spuds. When I went to install the heaters, I threw the hatches back and looked down into the bunker and thought oh my (lol). I retrieved my lantern and sure enough the bunker was full of ice.
I wasn’t about to ask the traffic manger to have the reefer unloaded. My laborer and I grabbed our ice tongs and breaker bar. We unloaded both bunkers and then installed the heaters.

Lenny


Bill Welch
 

Before the heaters could be installed the ice needed to be removed. Attached is a page from the April 1955 edition of the FGE-WFE-BRE employee magazine explaining this process. It is a large file but I was worried about it legibility if I reduced it.

Bill Welch


Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Aug 29, 2018 at 06:22 PM, Walter wrote:
I suspect you are referring to charcoal heaters in regard to the 30 minute wait period.
Charcoal heaters would slowly fill the car with carbon monoxide, and cars so equipped were required to be placarded with warning placards. I'm not seeing thirty minutes... the placards I'm finding photos of say either "three minutes", or "a few minutes." Carbon monoxide is odorless, and the second man was needed in case the man who went in the car was overcome.

Dennis Storzek


Bob Chaparro
 

The two types on Shapeways appear to be Preco heater and a Baxter heater.
Below is an image of a Baxter heater. Two Preco heaters are shown in my earlier post.
Bob Chaparro
Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group
https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup


Walter
 

Joe,

They did not burn kerosene, it was a 50/50 mix of methanol and isopropyl alcohol. I suspect you are referring to charcoal heaters in regard to the 30 minute wait period. Frankly, if I would have had to wait 30 minutes to refuel charcoal heaters I would have been working OT. There was a rule two people had to be present when refueling charcoal heaters.

Lenny Ohrnell


Richard Wilkens
 

These PRECO heaters burned methanol (alcohol).

Rich Wilkens


Paul Catapano
 

I and a friend, on his layout, model heater service using waybills (we call these "Action Bills") as well as ventilator service, but I do not specifically model the heaters themselves.
 
Paul Catapano



gnryfan
 

Nelson:
   I DO model heaters and heater service on my layout, thanks to some 3D printed (HO) Kerosene Preco heaters available through Shapeways. https://www.shapeways.com/product/ZJ3PRG64F/kerosene-heaters-for-reefers-ho-scale-x50?optionId=42258423.  They also have the charcoal heaters, too. https://www.shapeways.com/product/37P7EDL64/charcoal-heaters-for-reefers-ho-scale-x30?optionId=40283583.  The Preco's especially, are cheap detail parts for your icing platforms!
When you're modelling icing, you need to ice the car, re-ice it, etc. various ways. Heating is more complex. You need to install and remove the heaters, re-fuel the heater, AND, you cannot enter a heated car until 30 minutes after the heater has been shut off and the doors opened, to dissipate carbon monoxide...so it adds a little twist to unloading oeprations.  I handle all of these with extra tags that go in the waybill slot on my car cards.  It adds another dimension to the movement of fruit and perishables.

Joe Berger
Great Northern Railway (HO)
Cascade Division


gnryfan
 

Nelson:


Nelson Moyer
 

I was just reporting what I read. You didn't mention which railroad(s). Maybe some converted sooner? Weren't ice reefers about phased out by the early 1970. I think I read that the last icing platform was owned by PFE, and it was closed in either 1974 or 1976. Many roads switched to mechanical reefers earlier than that. I guess all the heater discussion is purely academic, since we don't model heaters or heater service.

Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Walter
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2018 10:40 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Reefers: Heaters

Nelson,

I was refueling charcoal heaters into 1970.

Lenny Ohrnell


Bob Chaparro
 

There are Jack Delano photos showing the older, larger charcoal heaters being lowered into cars in 1943. The newer alcohol heaters were smaller and required less work to load. Below are some photos from my collection.
Bob Chaparro
Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group
https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup


Walter
 

Nelson,

I was refueling charcoal heaters into 1970.

Lenny Ohrnell


Nelson Moyer
 

According to Jeff Wilson's book, "Produce Traffic and Trains", charcoal heaters were replaced with alcohol heaters in the 1940. Alcohol heaters were thermostatically controlled and had a pilot light, so that it was not necessary to remove and replace them with temperature variations as with the older charcoal heaters. From photos In the book, it looks like the alcohol heaters were smaller and lighter than charcoal heaters. A side bar on alcohol heaters shows a photo of the Preco version of an alcohol heater.

Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Walter
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2018 7:57 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Reefers: Heaters

Jim,

What type heaters are you referring to? I would guess during this groups time frame charcoal heaters would have been the norm. FWIW I never ran across a charcoal heater installed the way you described.

Lenny Ohrnell


Walter
 

Jim,

What type heaters are you referring to? I would guess during this groups time frame charcoal heaters would have been the norm. FWIW I never ran across a charcoal heater installed the way you described.

Lenny Ohrnell


np328
 

Heaters are "suspended" while in use in the reefer and I use that word in lack of a better one. 
They are chained in three or four places radially around the heaters anchored equal distance from the bunker walls. Not touching the floor either.
I have to think this is a two man job as someone has to clip the heater to the bunker walls once it is lowered and another man to pull the first person out as a safety measure.
 
  I used to have a heater I had picked up cheap ($25) at a railroad flea market. I left it behind somewhere knowingly as I came later question what value it really held. 

I would agree that 18 - 24 inches of diameter with 30 inches in height is close enough to get an idea of size. 

I will look up some images I have and post them.                                                           Jim Dick - St. Paul 


Paul Catapano
 

The only pictures I have seen (which isn't saying much) of heaters being inserted into Reefer bunkers show the car-man lowering the heater on the end of the same "hook" he used to maneuver and chop ice blocks. The heaters did not seem that large. Maybe 12"-18" square (round).
I regularly have seen both photo's and video of employee's chopping the 300 pound blocks into small pieces, with the long pole/hook.

My guess is that if you dropped a 300 pound block of ice into a reefer bunker whole you could damage the bunker (At least during the initial icing).


 
Paul Catapano