"X" on car doors


Paul Catapano
 

The large white "X" denoted highly explosive ammunition was loaded or to be loaded in these cars, this also made it much easier for saboteurs and 5th columnists to hit the bulls eye with a rifle or gun at extreme ranges. These shots weren't easy to make, when you consider that the trains were moving, so the railroads agreed to add the "X" to make it easier for the enemy.
I sincerely hope this helps.
 
Paul Catapano



Alex Huff
 

It is my understanding that the X on boxcar doors on at least the CNW meant the cars were in restricted service.  Called "trap cars" on the CNW, one of the assignments was transporting display goods to and from Chicago's Merchandise Mart, built directly over a CNW yard and outlying team tracks and/or satellite yards in the Chicago area.

Built by Marshall Field & Co to consolidate the wholesale merchandisers in one location,  it was the largest building in the world with 4,000,000 sq.ft. of floor space when opened in 1930.

Alex Huff      


ken chapin
 

XXX on the Chessie system the car was to be on home rail only,not fit for interchange to other railroads. Ken
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Sent from my Android phone with GMX Mail. Please excuse my brevity.

On 8/30/18, 11:35 AM Alex Huff <dsrc512@...> wrote:
It is my understanding that the X on boxcar doors on at least the CNW meant the cars were in restricted service.  Called "trap cars" on the CNW, one of the assignments was transporting display goods to and from Chicago's Merchandise Mart, built directly over a CNW yard and outlying team tracks and/or satellite yards in the Chicago area.

Built by Marshall Field & Co to consolidate the wholesale merchandisers in one location,  it was the largest building in the world with 4,000,000 sq.ft. of floor space when opened in 1930.

Alex Huff      


Tim Meyer
 

I have a CNW blueprint on the boxcar door with the X from April 1930. Car numbers 15800 to 15998 even. "FOR MERCHANDISE LOADING PROVISO AND CHICAGO ONLY" in 2" lettering to the right of the door. The X has a 9" stroke.

Tim Meyer