on the left, there is a B&O gon


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
I noticed an odd thing on this photo - on the left, there is a B&O gon. It seems to me that two of the gon panels extend lower down than the rest do. Is this an illusion or other photographic artifact? A repair? A complete anomaly?
 
 
Claus Schlund
 


al_brown03
 

Does it have a hopper bottom, maybe, or did it?

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


O Fenton Wells
 

And right behind that is a Southern SU boxcar.  Just say'in
Fenton Wells

On Mon, Sep 10, 2018 at 3:47 PM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
I noticed an odd thing on this photo - on the left, there is a B&O gon. It seems to me that two of the gon panels extend lower down than the rest do. Is this an illusion or other photographic artifact? A repair? A complete anomaly?
 
 
Claus Schlund
 




--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Ray Breyer
 

Looking at the photo I see 341xxx as the road number. Per Eric Hansmann's survey of the B&O's 1926 gondola fleet ( http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/BO_1926_Fleet_gondolas.pdf ) that makes the car an O-18a. However, I've got a few photos of O-18's, and none of them have this goofy extension on them.

I have a few (bad) copies of B&O car diagrams. One of them lists ONE car - 341643 - as an O-18c, which was modified with side dump hoppers. That diagram might match this single car. There's no note as to when the conversion was done, but this may be an image of a single, experimental B&O car.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


On Monday, September 10, 2018, 2:48:01 PM CDT, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) <claus@...> wrote:


Hi List Members,
 
I noticed an odd thing on this photo - on the left, there is a B&O gon. It seems to me that two of the gon panels extend lower down than the rest do. Is this an illusion or other photographic artifact? A repair? A complete anomaly?
 
 
Claus Schlund
 


Bill Welch
 

Southern SU with "T" braced end available from Westerfield.

Bill Welch


Eric Hansmann
 

The B&O gondola in this 1926 DL&W photograph is an O-18 class car. This car class held 39% of the B&O gondola fleet of 1926. More details can be found on this 1926 equipment summary.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/BO_1926_Fleet_gondolas.pdf


Based upon the first three digits of the B&O car number (341), this is an O-18a car. The drop doors have been removed and the car now has a solid wood bottom. This car was modified about 1922 and the irregular steel plates along the side sill may have been a result of that modification of a repair. I have not seen a B&O O-18 with this odd side sill look.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On September 10, 2018 at 1:47 PM "Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)" <claus@...> wrote:

Hi List Members,
 
I noticed an odd thing on this photo - on the left, there is a B&O gon. It seems to me that two of the gon panels extend lower down than the rest do. Is this an illusion or other photographic artifact? A repair? A complete anomaly?
 
 
Claus Schlund
 


_.


rwitt_2000
 

Claus and all,

I believe the object is real, but I have never seen such an attachment. The class O-18 originally were drop-bottom gondolas or gondolas with drop bottom doors. The doors were removed around 1925 and they were rebuilt into flat bottom gondolas. Is there a date for the photo? All I can add is that the "extra steel plate" is located were the drop bottom doors would be located and there appears to stenciling on the "plate".

The B&O O-18 fleet was about 8,000 cars but apparently very few were photographed. A very camera shy freight car.

Bob Witt


Jim Betz
 

 As long as we are looking at this particular image ...

  What's going on with the track on the right (where the dwarfs are) ???
Sure -looks- strange to me.
                                                                          - Jim B.


Richard Brennan
 

At 07:45 PM 9/10/2018, Jim Betz wrote:
As long as we are looking at this particular image ...
http://www.railfan.net/lists/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-08-02-18/X4896.jpg
What's going on with the track on the right (where the dwarfs are) ???
Sure -looks- strange to me.
...just a foreshortened view of the switch points thrown for the classification yard?


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


D. Scott Chatfield
 

The extra rail is a type of point guard.  Must have had a problem with wheels picking those points.  Not typical practice in the lifetime of almost all of us on this list.  Point guards are usually castings mounted to the outside of the points and push the wheel away from the point.  Normally only used on low speed track, like in yards.


Scott Chatfield


Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Sep 10, 2018 at 01:31 PM, O Fenton Wells wrote:
And right behind that is a Southern SU boxcar.  Just say'in
Well... the car coupled to the other end is the new Accurail 36' car. While the fishbelly center sill shows underneath, the real spotting feature is the bolster ends.

Dennis Storzek


Eric Hansmann
 

On September 11, 2018 at 6:14 AM Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

Well... the car coupled to the other end is the new Accurail 36' car. While the fishbelly center sill shows underneath, the real spotting feature is the bolster ends.

Many of the boxcars in that string could be modeled using Accurail kits. Beyond the Southern SU car is a Canadian Pacific Fowler. While we can't determine if it has a 5- or 6-foot door, the  new Accurail Fowler makes for a good starting point on a CPR 6-foot door Fowler. 

The remaining cars are difficult to identify but all seem similar with truss rods, grab iron ladders, and doors opening to the right. I suspect these are Lackawanna boxcars. Adding truss rods to a straight centersill Accurail double-sheathed shorty with wood ends would be a fair reflection of the prototypes. 

Modeling the mid-1920s is fun.


Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Sep 10, 2018 at 11:11 PM, D. Scott Chatfield wrote:
The extra rail is a type of point guard.  Must have had a problem with wheels picking those points.
Looks like a case of good ol' field expediency. The track arrangement looks tight, and the route coming off the diverging route of a trailing turnout immediately into the diverging route of a facing turnout has the wheels crowding the outer rail of the curve. Must have been an inordinate number of derailments there, so they cobbled up a short guard rail to pull the wheels away from the point... while running in either direction. The guard rail looks like a standard guardrail as used with a frog; at any rate it is held in place with what I recall is a Wharton clamp, same as the guardrails at the frog in the near foreground.

Dennis Storzek
Dennis Storzek


Jim Betz
 

Scott,
  Thanks for the answer.  I have never seen that before and so I 
suspected it was a practice/method that was discontinued due to
better methods being developed.
  You have to admit it is truly weird/strange/curious/whatever!
                                                                                                   - Jim B.


D. Scott Chatfield
 

Speaking of trucks, the B&O gon's trucks look unusual.  Any thoughts?

And no, I have no idea why those two panels are deeper.  The car appears to have KC brakes, so it's not protecting the brake gear.  Hmmmm


Scott Chatfield


rwitt_2000
 

It is very blurry upon enlargement, but my guess is they are Tatum arch bar trucks. J. J. Tatum was The General Superintendent of the Car Department for the B&ORR. I can't find a photo, but have included the patent drawing for the truck side frame. He also created the wagon-top design, the raised roof for the class M-27 automobile boxcar, ladders, slack adjusters, box car doors, hopper heap shields, covered gondola, etc., etc.

Tatum thought to the end that the arch bar was the best solution as they were so easy to repair.

Bob Witt


rwitt_2000
 

My ".tiff" image did not display the thumbnail so here's the "jpg".

Bob Witt