Jersey City, NJ--Grain pier [1917.09.20]


Eric Lombard
 

Hello Everyone...

Here is a photo from the Steam Town National Historic Park site. It is public domain. Lots of details of the process and the stencil over the open door is "B&O". Does the scraper-like device have a name (other than "back breaker")? There are additional photos of the external aspect of the Jersey City grain pier.

https://npgallery.nps.gov/AssetDetail/d3fb4aa9-c266-466a-942c-70dc2b089056?

Eric Lombard
Homewood, IL


Eric Hansmann
 

Eric,

I think this tool was pulled along and not pushed. A man might guide it from behind but I believe it was pulled along by the cable in the foreground that leads out the door. This would have eased unloading of bulk cargo once the cargo level dropped enough to stand in the car. I'm sure the tool would have been wrestled back to the car end to push more cargo to the door. Click on the link for Original Size to view the details better. Once the image loads, click on it to see the full size.

Note the door on the right is blocked by boards to keep the cargo from seeping out.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN



On September 26, 2018 at 4:16 PM Eric Lombard <elombard@...> wrote:

Hello Everyone...

Here is a photo from the Steam Town National Historic Park site. It is public domain. Lots of details of the process and the stencil over the open door is "B&O". Does the scraper-like device have a name (other than "back breaker")? There are additional photos of the external aspect of the Jersey City grain pier.

https://npgallery.nps.gov/AssetDetail/d3fb4aa9-c266-466a-942c-70dc2b089056?

Eric Lombard
Homewood, IL


Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Sep 26, 2018 at 03:16 PM, Eric Lombard wrote:
Does the scraper-like device have a name (other than "back breaker")?
Power shovel comes to mind (note the cable to a winch outside the car.) The same sort of rig was used in underground mining to drag broken ore to the ore chute. While I'm sure steering the shovel was work, it was more work to drag it back to the end of the car for the next pull.

Dennis Storzek


earlyrail
 

It would be a back breaker if it was manual.
It is a power "shovel".  Note the cable/rope going out the door.

Howard Garner

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Douglas Harding
 

The man shown in the Jersey City Grain Pier photo is using a power shovel or automatic shovel. As Eric pointed out, the device is pull by a cable to the door opening, pushing grain out the open door into a waiting hopper. A man was responsible for pulling it back into the car and shoving it down into the grain for the next pull. Attached is a photo of an automatic shovel being used in Grinnell Iowa. The pulley guided the cable, which was attached to a motor outside the boxcar. These shovels were used to unload grain, coal, and most any loose commodity put in boxcars. Another photo shows farmers using one to unload a boxcar in Idaho.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 6:30 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Jersey City, NJ--Grain pier [1917.09.20]

 

Eric,

I think this tool was pulled along and not pushed. A man might guide it from behind but I believe it was pulled along by the cable in the foreground that leads out the door. This would have eased unloading of bulk cargo once the cargo level dropped enough to stand in the car. I'm sure the tool would have been wrestled back to the car end to push more cargo to the door. Click on the link for Original Size to view the details better. Once the image loads, click on it to see the full size.

Note the door on the right is blocked by boards to keep the cargo from seeping out.

 

Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

On September 26, 2018 at 4:16 PM Eric Lombard <elombard@...> wrote:

Hello Everyone...

Here is a photo from the Steam Town National Historic Park site. It is public domain. Lots of details of the process and the stencil over the open door is "B&O". Does the scraper-like device have a name (other than "back breaker")? There are additional photos of the external aspect of the Jersey City grain pier.

https://npgallery.nps.gov/AssetDetail/d3fb4aa9-c266-466a-942c-70dc2b089056?

Eric Lombard
Homewood, IL


Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Sep 26, 2018 at 07:33 PM, Douglas Harding wrote:
The pulley guided the cable, which was attached to a motor outside the boxcar.
Doug,

Have you ever run into an account how these were actually operated? Was this a two man job? I've tried to dream up a scheme where the operator on the shovel could control either the winch or a clutch on the winch drum, and can't see any way of doing it without a second control line, which never shows in the photos... So I have to assume there was a second man outside the car running the winch, which doubles the labor cost.

Items of note in the photos:

In the original photo there is another of those swiveling pullies visible outside the open car door, positioned for when the power shovel is used in the other end of the car.

In the photo of the two men, the remnant of a "paper" (corrugated cardboard) grain door is visible on the door post, while there is an electric fan perched on top of the intact paper grain door behind them.



Dennis Storzek


Douglas Harding
 

Dennis, my understanding was a power shovel was a two man operation, one in the boxcar holding the handles of the shovel, and a second man on the outside controlling the motor or winch that pulled the cable. The pulley was there to guide the cable so it did not get “hung up” on the door posts. And this was a one way operation, the cable pulled the shovel toward the door opening, pushing grain out the door and into the pit below, the power shovel begin larger than the traditional scoop shovel used. Once at the door, then the inside man picked up or drug the shovel back to the far reaches of the boxcar, dragging the cable as he went. Anyone who has ever tried to walk through grain knows how difficult this would be. Grain is loose and fluid, it moves everywhere and offers no traction.

 

Grain also generates a lot of dust, dust that can lead to breathing problems. That may be the reason for the fan.

 

Here’s a nice photo showing how grain was loaded into boxcars http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsa.8b18466/

This photos says it shows the wheel for a power grain shovel http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/hhh.pa3351.photos.359481p/

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2018 10:23 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Jersey City, NJ--Grain pier [1917.09.20]

 

On Wed, Sep 26, 2018 at 07:33 PM, Douglas Harding wrote:

The pulley guided the cable, which was attached to a motor outside the boxcar.

Doug,

Have you ever run into an account how these were actually operated? Was this a two man job? I've tried to dream up a scheme where the operator on the shovel could control either the winch or a clutch on the winch drum, and can't see any way of doing it without a second control line, which never shows in the photos... So I have to assume there was a second man outside the car running the winch, which doubles the labor cost.

Items of note in the photos:

In the original photo there is another of those swiveling pullies visible outside the open car door, positioned for when the power shovel is used in the other end of the car.

In the photo of the two men, the remnant of a "paper" (corrugated cardboard) grain door is visible on the door post, while there is an electric fan perched on top of the intact paper grain door behind them.



Dennis Storzek


Andy Brusgard <ajb1102@...>
 

Not too far from where I grew up in Jersey City.
As mentioned, grain handling creates a lot of dust.
And we all know silos have been known to blow up.
Wondering if a freight car ever did ???
Andy Brusgard 
www.ModelEngineers.org