MKT cars


roblmclear
 

Hello

I have a question for the guru's on this list, I am quite enamoured with the MKT's yellow boxcars and am hoping that Speedwitch will be doing a re-run of the resin kit one day.   I haven't been able to find any reasonable stand ins for the cars.   In any case I would like to know a couple of things, how many classes of the lines boxcars were painted this way?   What time period would be applicable to see the cars in this yellow scheme? (I model 1947) and lastly I see that some models for the MKT for my time period are painted in the boxcar brown and white lettering, when was this scheme introduced?   Thanks for any help and or information you can supply.

Regards
Rob McLear
Australia.


Tim O'Connor
 

Rob

MKT still had yellow box cars in the 1950's. And they built brand new yellow box cars
in 1943 for the "war emergency". Those would most likely still be yellow in 1947.

Tim O'


I have a question for the guru's on this list, I am quite enamoured with the MKT's yellow boxcars and am hoping that Speedwitch will be doing a re-run of the resin kit one day.   I haven't been able to find any reasonable stand ins for the cars.   In any case I would like to know a couple of things, how many classes of the lines boxcars were painted this way?   What time period would be applicable to see the cars in this yellow scheme? (I model 1947) and lastly I see that some models for the MKT for my time period are painted in the boxcar brown and white lettering, when was this scheme introduced?   Thanks for any help and or information you can supply.

Regards
Rob McLear

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


steve_wintner
 

Master Modeler Welch was (is?) working on the War Emergency car. Suggest searching "Welch mkt" - I turned up some posts in May of this year.

Have fun
Steve


roblmclear
 

Does the Intermountain War Emergency car come close to these.

Rob McLear
Aussie.


steve_wintner
 

Rob, check the archives at https://realstmfc.groups.io/g/main/topic/

Search, as I suggested. The answer is "kind of". Depends on your persnicketiness.

Steve


Ken Roth
 

Rob and Co.
I'm going to jump into the fray since I recently completed a model of the MKT 79xxx war emergency box car.  This project was inspired by a black and white photo of an obviously yellow-painted MKT car in Tom Dill and Ed Austin's "Southern Pacific In Oregon Pictorial".  The picture in question was taken sometime in the early 1950's in Eugene, Oregon which answers the question of whether the cars were still yellow in the late 40's.  As to the accuracy of a model based on the Intermountain War Emergency box, I would say "not without modifications".  It would need at least replacing the underframe with a fish-belly reefer underframe such as Accurail or Branchline.  This requires some length adjustment and new cross members.  Bill Welch's thread earlier this year identifies some other body changes that should be done.  After study of prototype photos given to me by the late Richard Hendrickson, I elected to scratchbuild the sides to come closer to the spacing of the prototype trusses, and used a Red Caboose AAR roof.  I did use the Intermountain ends, however.  The unusual grabs and ladders on the car are also scratchbuilt. Decals are mostly from an old Oddball decal set which is no longer available, but I had to make my own decals to get the correct dimensional data. It ain't perfect, but I'm attaching a couple of photos anyway.  I am not quite satisfied with the paint color on my model.  I used TCP MKT yellow, but was informed by a friend with very good color perception that it is not so close.  So ... more weathering is in order.   Ken Roth


Bill Welch
 

Nicely done Ken, love seeing the scratch built sides. I have taken a break form mine but it is almost ready for paint. I am using Modelflex MKT yellow.

Bill Welch


gtws00
 

Ken that is an impressive build you have here. Looks great.
George Toman


O Fenton Wells
 

Herald King has suitable decals for this car as well.
Fenton Wells

On Fri, Oct 5, 2018 at 9:58 PM Ken Roth <krowth3249@...> wrote:
Rob and Co.
I'm going to jump into the fray since I recently completed a model of the MKT 79xxx war emergency box car.  This project was inspired by a black and white photo of an obviously yellow-painted MKT car in Tom Dill and Ed Austin's "Southern Pacific In Oregon Pictorial".  The picture in question was taken sometime in the early 1950's in Eugene, Oregon which answers the question of whether the cars were still yellow in the late 40's.  As to the accuracy of a model based on the Intermountain War Emergency box, I would say "not without modifications".  It would need at least replacing the underframe with a fish-belly reefer underframe such as Accurail or Branchline.  This requires some length adjustment and new cross members.  Bill Welch's thread earlier this year identifies some other body changes that should be done.  After study of prototype photos given to me by the late Richard Hendrickson, I elected to scratchbuild the sides to come closer to the spacing of the prototype trusses, and used a Red Caboose AAR roof.  I did use the Intermountain ends, however.  The unusual grabs and ladders on the car are also scratchbuilt. Decals are mostly from an old Oddball decal set which is no longer available, but I had to make my own decals to get the correct dimensional data. It ain't perfect, but I'm attaching a couple of photos anyway.  I am not quite satisfied with the paint color on my model.  I used TCP MKT yellow, but was informed by a friend with very good color perception that it is not so close.  So ... more weathering is in order.   Ken Roth



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Gene Green <genegreen1942@...>
 

Your dissatisfaction with the color aside, you've done awfully nice work.  The model looks very good to me.
Gene Green


steve_wintner
 

Looks great Ken. I'd love to hear more about your build (and yours Bill!). I may well try one myself.

Stephan


Lester Breuer
 

Fine build.  Scratchbuilt sides very Impressive.   Can you provided additional information on how you built the sides.
Lester Breuer


Bill Welch
 

Steve, I have posted several photos here and on the RCW Workbench Wednesday and will be posting more as I proceed.

Bill Welch


Scott
 

Fantastic write up and model Ken!  Enjoyed reading that.

Scott McDonald


Ken Roth
 

Lester and All,
As to more details on construction of the sides, I began with .030" plain styrene sheet, scribed with a regular x-acto blade.  Parallel lines were achieved using a vernier caliber measuring each line from the bottom of the car side.  Once the lines were scribed, I drug the x-acto blade "upside down" to remove a bit more material. The sides were then scraped with a razor blade to remove raised burrs (I didn't do this enough!).  Next I drug sandpaper over all the boards to create some grain, leaving the top metal section and sill glossy smooth.  I also did a little random scraping of individual boards to get a little more definition, but I was really going for the look of a fairly recently-built car, which does not show a lot of gaps and irregularities between boards. Locations for the truss members were "milled out" just a bit using a scraper made from an old x-acto blade, ground to the width of the Z-brace.  I used hand-made .005" styrene strips 3" wide for the the thin edges of the braces (bolt heads were embossed prior to cutting the strips).  The milling allowed me to bury approximately half of the thickness of the .005 styrene. On top of the .005" styrene strip, I glued a 2x3, and then another piece of 3" wide .005" styrene for the outside of the Z-brace.  I built a jig to ensure a bit of overlap to depict the Z shape.  I'm indebted to Jim Hays for the Z-brace construction method.  Other bolt detail was made by embossing rivets on a scrap sheet of .005" styrene, which were harvested and applied to the sides where needed.  All of my rivet work is done with a Micro-mark drill press with x/y table and Northwest Shortline rivet dies.  The female dies were ground down a bit to allow closer rivet spacing for some applications, like my tank cars which I described on the PlasticFreightCarBuilders group last spring.  I only made one side and used it as a pattern to make resin copies for both sides and a pair of sides for my friend.  The mold was usable, but I don't have fancy casting tools for pressure casting, so casting was a bit problematic.  Producing more that a couple of sets would have required a more sophisticated casting setup.  Anyway, one needs just one of these cars since there were only about 150 in existence!  Ken Roth