Topics

BAR/NH Insulated Box Car Resin Kit

Peter Ness
 

I am looking for interest in a resin kit of the New Haven 45000-45099, BAR 2000-2299 40’ Steel Plug Door Insulated Box Cars (XIH) built by Pacific Car and Foundry in 1953 for both railroads. While these cars wore several schemes over the years, they are most noted for the popular red, white and blue “State of Maine” scheme. This will be a one-piece body kit.


If you are interested, please email me at prness”at”roadrunner”dot”com. Please use the title of this topic as the subject of your email. Also please include your name, mailing address and the quantity of kits you will purchase. 50 orders should do the trick. For those who reply I’ll keep you posted of progress towards the goal.


Thanks for your help and support.

Peter Ness

Tim O'Connor
 

Peter

I'm interested in a kit, especially if you can do repaint decals. :-)

Tim O'



I am looking for interest in a resin kit of the New Haven 45000-45099, BAR 2000-2299 40ft
Steel Plug Door Insulated Box Cars (XIH) built by Pacific Car and Foundry in 1953 for both
railroads. While these cars wore several schemes over the years, they are most noted for
the popular red, white and blue State of Maine scheme. This will be a one-piece body kit.

If you are interested, please email me at prness@... Please use the title of this
topic as the subject of your email. Also please include your name, mailing address and the
quantity of kits you will purchase. 50 orders should do the trick. For those who reply
I'll keep you posted of progress towards the goal.

Thanks for your help and support.

Peter Ness

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Peter Ness
 

Hi Tim,

I’m not doing decals, lol.  This will most likely be an F&C kit and my experience with their decals is they are not the most desirable in any case. I don’t know what Microscale or others offer for BAR decals, but I think Highball graphics offers what you’re looking for.

http://mgdecals.com/F-250.htm

 

Knowing that, if you’re in for one, please reply with an address.  This is no commitment at this time until we hit 50 kits and I will keep folks posts as we progress.

 

Regards,

Peter

 

From: Tim O'Connor [mailto:timboconnor@...]
Sent: Monday, October 8, 2018 1:05 PM
To: prness@...; realstmfc@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] BAR/NH Insulated Box Car Resin Kit

 

Peter

I'm interested in a kit, especially if you can do repaint decals. :-)

Tim O'



I am looking for interest in a resin kit of the New Haven 45000-45099, BAR 2000-2299 40ft
Steel Plug Door Insulated Box Cars (XIH) built by Pacific Car and Foundry in 1953 for both
railroads. While these cars wore several schemes over the years, they are most noted for
the popular red, white and blue State of Maine scheme. This will be a one-piece body kit.

If you are interested, please email me at prness@... Please use the title of this
topic as the subject of your email. Also please include your name, mailing address and the
quantity of kits you will purchase. 50 orders should do the trick. For those who reply
I'll keep you posted of progress towards the goal.

Thanks for your help and support.

Peter Ness

Pierre Oliver
 

Talk to Ted Culotta about decals


On Oct 8, 2018, at 1:21 PM, Peter Ness <prness@...> wrote:

Hi Tim,

I’m not doing decals, lol.  This will most likely be an F&C kit and my experience with their decals is they are not the most desirable in any case. I don’t know what Microscale or others offer for BAR decals, but I think Highball graphics offers what you’re looking for.

http://mgdecals.com/F-250.htm

 

Knowing that, if you’re in for one, please reply with an address.  This is no commitment at this time until we hit 50 kits and I will keep folks posts as we progress.

 

Regards,

Peter

 

From: Tim O'Connor [mailto:timboconnor@...]
Sent: Monday, October 8, 2018 1:05 PM
To: prness@...; realstmfc@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] BAR/NH Insulated Box Car Resin Kit

 

Peter

I'm interested in a kit, especially if you can do repaint decals. :-)

Tim O'



I am looking for interest in a resin kit of the New Haven 45000-45099, BAR 2000-2299 40ft
Steel Plug Door Insulated Box Cars (XIH) built by Pacific Car and Foundry in 1953 for both
railroads. While these cars wore several schemes over the years, they are most noted for
the popular red, white and blue State of Maine scheme. This will be a one-piece body kit.

If you are interested, please email me at prness@... Please use the title of this
topic as the subject of your email. Also please include your name, mailing address and the
quantity of kits you will purchase. 50 orders should do the trick. For those who reply
I'll keep you posted of progress towards the goal.

Thanks for your help and support.

Peter Ness

Ted Culotta
 

Artwork is done for the SoM scheme. I did it for another prospective kit manufacturer and he did not act upon it. No idea about the status of his project. I will be happy to offer the decals. For Tim and others, I started on the modern scheme and can have some of those run, too.

Cheers,
Ted

Ted Culotta
Speedwitch Media
P.O. Box 392, Guilford, CT 06437

Tim O'Connor
 


Does anyone know if Highball has improved his decals? I bought some a number
of years ago, and they are very "pixelated" - appear to be done on a computer
printer. If Ted Culotta is having Cartograf decals made, I will be happy with those!

Tim O'



Hi Tim,
Im not doing decals, lol.  This will most likely be an F&C kit and my experience with their decals is they are not the most desirable in any case. I dont know what Microscale or others offer for BAR decals, but I think Highball graphics offers what youre looking for.
http://mgdecals.com/F-250.htm
 
Knowing that, if youre in for one, please reply with an address.  This is no commitment at this time until we hit 50 kits and I will keep folks posts as we progress.
 
Regards,
Peter
 

I'm interested in a kit, especially if you can do repaint decals. :-)

Tim O'



I am looking for interest in a resin kit of the New Haven 45000-45099, BAR 2000-2299 40ft
Steel Plug Door Insulated Box Cars (XIH) built by Pacific Car and Foundry in 1953 for both
railroads. While these cars wore several schemes over the years, they are most noted for
the popular red, white and blue State of Maine scheme. This will be a one-piece body kit.

If you are interested, please email me at prness@... Please use the title of this
topic as the subject of your email. Also please include your name, mailing address and the
quantity of kits you will purchase. 50 orders should do the trick. For those who reply
I'll keep you posted of progress towards the goal.

Thanks for your help and support.

Peter Ness

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Peter Ness
 

From Jim Abbot’s web site;

 

Highball Graphics Decals are printed using a Kodak Polychrome Graphics First Check proofer. This uses the same Micro Dry Technology as the Alps MD Series printers. I use a high quality Water Slide decal paper from Microscale Industries. Although the decal film is thin, it's very strong, and can be hard to work with in big sections. The end result is well worth the extra time applying them. Be very careful to avoid contact with the surface of the decal with tweezers or other hard objects as they can scratch very easily. After the model is finish coated you won't have to worry about it. I Suggest using luke warm water as hot water activates the paper too quickly and can make the decals hard to handle. I prefer using Walthers Solvaset for a setting solution although any commercial decal set will work. Because of the characteristics of the ink itself it will not shrink down over details as well as Silk Screened decals. I suggest gently using a soft pencil eraser to help stretch the decals down over small details but only after the decal has initially set up. Then you can hit it again with decal set. They may take some getting used too but I think you will be very pleased with the results. If you have any questions at all please feel free to ask.

 

Jim made some New Haven TOFC trailer decals for me almost 10 years ago and I’ve also used the New Haven MOW decals.  Neither were pixelated like a dot matrix printer. YMMV.

 

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Monday, October 8, 2018 2:43 PM
To: realstmfc@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] BAR/NH Insulated Box Car Resin Kit

 


Does anyone know if Highball has improved his decals? I bought some a number
of years ago, and they are very "pixelated" - appear to be done on a computer
printer. If Ted Culotta is having Cartograf decals made, I will be happy with those!

Tim O'




Hi Tim,
I’m not doing decals, lol.  This will most likely be an F&C kit and my experience with their decals is they are not the most desirable in any case. I don’t know what Microscale or others offer for BAR decals, but I think Highball graphics offers what you’re looking for.
http://mgdecals.com/F-250.htm
 
Knowing that, if you’re in for one, please reply with an address.  This is no commitment at this time until we hit 50 kits and I will keep folks posts as we progress.
 
Regards,
Peter
 

I'm interested in a kit, especially if you can do repaint decals. :-)

Tim O'



I am looking for interest in a resin kit of the New Haven 45000-45099, BAR 2000-2299 40ft
Steel Plug Door Insulated Box Cars (XIH) built by Pacific Car and Foundry in 1953 for both
railroads. While these cars wore several schemes over the years, they are most noted for
the popular red, white and blue State of Maine scheme. This will be a one-piece body kit.

If you are interested, please email me at prness@... Please use the title of this
topic as the subject of your email. Also please include your name, mailing address and the
quantity of kits you will purchase. 50 orders should do the trick. For those who reply
I'll keep you posted of progress towards the goal.

Thanks for your help and support.

Peter Ness


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Dave Parker
 

Based on recent experience, and current info on the webpage, I don't think that is an accurate description of how Highball now prints custom decals.  I believe that all "everyday" printing is now done with an OHKI CMYKW laser printer (1200 dpi).

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA

Scott
 

Dave, is that a good thing or bad thing?

Scott McDonald

Dave Parker
 

Scott:

I think opinions on this will vary.  Colors other than black and white will be pixelated, albeit at 1200 dpi. In general, laser printers do not produce decals that are as opaque as those printed by more traditional means.  But, I think resolution will generally be better.  For me, that's a good trade-off, but folks wanting very bright and bold lettering may not be as satisfied.

The other advantage with Highball's OHKI printer is that you have much more control over color, as it can be programmed to produce just about any Pantone color out there. 

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA

John Hagen <sprinthag@...>
 

Why would colors be pixelated? That is controlled by the artwork. As long as the artwork is a vector format, there should be no pixelation.
Pixelation occurs when when vector artwork is rasterized, or if the artwork is done using a photo program. All photo formats are pixelated (rasterized) and are a poor choice for decal artwork.
Yes, if at a high enough resolution and the file has not been changed or re-scaled, a decent print can be made. But using a SVG (Scalable Vector Graphic) is way better and easier.
Having had decals printed using Oki laser proof printers, I have not found any pixelation. What I do find is problems with the thickness of the printing causing problems with getting the decal to conform to the surface it is applied to and even problems with getting them to adhere to the model.
If they can get around those problems, the Oki printed decals will be a real boon due to their range of colors and high resolutions,
John Hagen

Dennis Storzek
 

John,

Everything you said is true, provided you can set the printer to use "spot color", which is a printer's term for using a solid print of one color ink. If however, you just compose the colered art on the computer screen and allow the computer to try to match the colors, it is going to try to do so with the CMYK processcolors, and on older low resolution printers, the results are less than stellar. One of the advantages of the old ALPS printers is they had a good selection of ribbon colors to choose from.

I have no experiance with the new OKI laser printers, so can't comment.

Dennis Storzek

Dave Parker
 

John Hagen asked:  Why would colors be pixelated?

Since we are talking about Highball Graphics and their new OKI laser printer, this (straight from their website) would seem to answer that question:

With the new OKI C942 we are no longer able to print in multi layer spot colors. It uses Toner on separate drums to print in CMYKW. Print layout now is very simple. You will just need 1 layer for your artwork. first change your background color to a color of your choice (except white). I normally use a light blue. Also make sure the "print background color" option is toggled off.  Create your artwork in the exact colors you want to be printed. This printer matches Pantone colors very well. Like all CMYK printers there are certain colors that do not print so well like light blue's & light gray's. This printer is 1200 DPI so the line spacing is very tight but you will see lines in certain colors. Short of screen printing there is no way around this. Pure white artwork (C=0, M=0, Y=0, K=0) will print white on this machine. All colors except black will have a white underlay automatically.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA

John Hagen <sprinthag@...>
 

Dennis,

Not being able to use “Spot Color” mode on a printer does not create pixilation.

What is does create is a “spot matrix” pattern in the color. There is a definite difference.

Pixelation will create a blurred edge along any edge, straight or curved unless It is an absolutely straight line at either 0 or 90 degrees.

A spot matrix will be noticeable when viewing the decal closely, less so if one is a foot or more away but will not be blurred.

I agree this is sort like “six of one; a half dozen of the other” but of the two, I find the matrix to be less of a problem than pixelation.

I use Alps printers for my decals. I use spot colors when ever possible. Sometimes it can’t be done.

Alps only had CMYK color and white cartridges. Other companies who had Alps build versions of the MD series printers for their purposes had other colors available. These could be used in an Alps by changing the color code sticker for an Alps color. Such as using Cyan for a Blue Spot cartridge. Of course, you could not have both a Cyan and the Blue Spot cartridges loaded at the same time. But now it is getting very difficult to find affordable CMYK or White cartridges.

The Alps MD5000 and MD5500 could be used as a dye-sub printer for photos which was a better choice for photos but that required special dye-sub cartridges and a dye-sum key (adaptor). This was not usable for decals, many have tried over time.

What is amazing is how well the Alps MD printers, limited as they are to 600 dpi max. can print decals including some rather tiny lettering if the operator knew ow to do proper vector artwork and knew the ins and outs of these persnickety printers. There was a lot of un-favorable comments about the Alps printed decals, and much of it deserved as many who jumped on the custom decal wagon when they came out did not know how to di it right. They had the color matrix, lots of pixelation and the inks were often so thick so as to prevent them from conforming to the surface.

But, taking time to navigate the long learning curve would lead to some very well done decals.

John Hagen

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 3:11 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] BAR/NH Insulated Box Car Resin Kit

 

John,

Everything you said is true, provided you can set the printer to use "spot color", which is a printer's term for using a solid print of one color ink. If however, you just compose the colered art on the computer screen and allow the computer to try to match the colors, it is going to try to do so with the CMYK processcolors, and on older low resolution printers, the results are less than stellar. One of the advantages of the old ALPS printers is they had a good selection of ribbon colors to choose from.

I have no experiance with the new OKI laser printers, so can't comment.

Dennis Storzek

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Oct 10, 2018 at 02:36 PM, John Hagen wrote:

Not being able to use “Spot Color” mode on a printer does not create pixilation.

What is does create is a “spot matrix” pattern in the color. There is a definite difference.

John,

Does it occur to you that the previous poster was using the wrong term? Whether one calls it pixelation or a spot matrix, the end result is pokadots in your graphics, which is a complaint I've heard since the ALPS was first introduced. We have an ALPS, which I don't design for, but I'm under the impression we could get black, white, red, green, blue, and some metallics in addition to CMY, which we don't even stock.  I know Eric occasionally runs two layers of different spot color to get what he needs.

Dennis Storzek

John Hagen <sprinthag@...>
 

Sorry. Nothing here indicates any pixelation.

Really this is getting a tad silly.

Some here are calling fine lines, spot matrix in colors and what not as pixelation.

Pixelation in printing means the item being printed is a photo format such as tiff, jpeg or something similar. That means that under magnification, sometimes strong or sometimes hardly any, the edges of any one color is shown as tiny squares. The size of the squares is dependent on the dpi, which could be more accurately be called squares per inch. These “dots” (for easy typing) inside the particular colors border are fully colored, solid red in a red area, solid blue in a blue area, etc.

But along  the borders the dots fade from their basic color. And the more of the dots that is outside the border the less of the color is in the dots. Instead the dots are a combination of the of the color and that of its neighbor color. Now, depending on the dpi, these dots may be small enough that our eye sees them as a fine segue from one color to another. But examine it close up and the pixels show up. That is pixelation. All rasterized formats have it. All vector formats do not.

Provided a decal is printed by any sort of modern printer with at least 600 dpi. Vector graphic will not display pixelation. Laser, inkjet, Alps, none of them.

Print a rasterized (photo format) design and the pixelation will show if looked at close enough. Not so much in actual photos where there multiple colors that all fade into one another but a photo of a box car and its lettering most certainly show pixelation. Take any photo you have handy stored on your hard drive or one off the web and enlarge it. It will at some point start showing pixelation. And then you copy it and go to print it again and the pixelation will get worse unless you do certain things to prevent it, and then it may still get worse.

But this is Definity different from the spot matrix shown in colors that are obtained by adding dots (yes real dots here)of CYMK (four color printer) or other ink colors in six or more color printers. No matter how many ink colors the printer can use, all the colors in the rainbow require a matrix of the available colors to make them. The smaller the dots the less noticeable the matrix is but it is there unless the image is printed in spot colors.

Which is another whole story I will not go into here.

Also, every printer has a certain number of lpi (Lines Per Inch) that will affect as in “This printer is 1200 DPI so the line spacing is very tight but you will see lines in certain colors.”  Actually he is slightly incorrect as there is a difference between dpi and lpi although on today’s high resolution printers it become hard to tell the difference. But that is another issue I will not go into at this time.

I purchased my first Alps in 1999 or 2000 for printing decals. That began a very long learning process that is still going on today. But all this talk about pixels, dpi, lpi, vector, rasterize, etc. has vexed me since my first decals did not print out as good as thought they would. That’s 18 0r 19 years of searching the answers.

John Hagen

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Parker via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 4:30 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] BAR/NH Insulated Box Car Resin Kit

 

John Hagen asked:  Why would colors be pixelated?

Since we are talking about Highball Graphics and their new OKI laser printer, this (straight from their website) would seem to answer that question:

With the new OKI C942 we are no longer able to print in multi layer spot colors. It uses Toner on separate drums to print in CMYKW. Print layout now is very simple. You will just need 1 layer for your artwork. first change your background color to a color of your choice (except white). I normally use a light blue. Also make sure the "print background color" option is toggled off.  Create your artwork in the exact colors you want to be printed. This printer matches Pantone colors very well. Like all CMYK printers there are certain colors that do not print so well like light blue's & light gray's. This printer is 1200 DPI so the line spacing is very tight but you will see lines in certain colors. Short of screen printing there is no way around this. Pure white artwork (C=0, M=0, Y=0, K=0) will print white on this machine. All colors except black will have a white underlay automatically.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA

John Hagen <sprinthag@...>
 

Dennis.

Yes I am probably going waaayyyy overboard on this. But I feel a need to be very accurate on describing decal problems because some are caused by the printing machine, some, generally more, by poor artwork and some by not understanding the strengths and weaknesses of different printers.

Anyone who takes the time to draw accurate vector format graphics for artwork is got a good start on producing a good decal.

Then it becomes a matter of what printer you have available and/or what you can AFFORD to have available.

In the case of Alps printers, someone who know exactly what they can and cannot do with one can produce some very well done decals.

Vector graphics eliminates “pixelation” and spot printing when u sing an Alps will eliminate the “spot matrix” effect.

This is not easy to do at times and impossible at other times. But I have printed decals that are mostly spot color with certain areas that most be printed using the printers color matching function that are very nicely done.

For the general railroad freights car colors of white or black, there is no problem using spot colors. A rather common green and red can easily be done using layered spot colors. Only a very bright, pure yellow and be printed using spot colors. If you can find tinting cartridges such as Spot Red, Green and Blue many other hues can be spot printed. There was a process orange that is now all but impossible to find.

For any other yellow, including the common “safety” yellow used by railroads. All but a very rather reddish orange and any grays, you will need the matrix colors.

Sorry about my “rants” but so much is not understood very well.

John Hagen

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 5:52 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] BAR/NH Insulated Box Car Resin Kit

 

On Wed, Oct 10, 2018 at 02:36 PM, John Hagen wrote:

Not being able to use “Spot Color” mode on a printer does not create pixilation.

What is does create is a “spot matrix” pattern in the color. There is a definite difference.

John,

Does it occur to you that the previous poster was using the wrong term? Whether one calls it pixelation or a spot matrix, the end result is pokadots in your graphics, which is a complaint I've heard since the ALPS was first introduced. We have an ALPS, which I don't design for, but I'm under the impression we could get black, white, red, green, blue, and some metallics in addition to CMY, which we don't even stock.  I know Eric occasionally runs two layers of different spot color to get what he needs.

Dennis Storzek