GN Spokane Hillyard Yard Photo


Bob Chaparro
 

With a little photo editing this becomes a nice period photo of a lot of freight cars:

https://media.spokesman.com/photos/2016/10/24/spa68298.JPG_t1170.jpg?e2225bc5c1a75a1036ca3021fecba2b47792abfe

Caption: "Spokane yards of the Great Northern at Hillyard in 1946 showed immediately the effects of a nationwide rail strike. Thousands of empty and idle boxcars, oil tankers, gondolas and cattle cars stood on the tracks shortly after the strike was called."

The photo is from a news article titled "Getting There: Hillyard oil contamination puts roadblock in plans for North Spokane Corridor". Here is a link to the article:

http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2016/oct/24/getting-there-hillyard-oil-contamination-puts-road/

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Bill Keene
 

Bob,

Thanks for sharing this photo. 

I wonder what was the cause of the weathering displayed on the NKP double sheathed box car.

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On Oct 16, 2018, at 7:31 PM, Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

With a little photo editing this becomes a nice period photo of a lot of freight cars:

https://media.spokesman.com/photos/2016/10/24/spa68298.JPG_t1170.jpg?e2225bc5c1a75a1036ca3021fecba2b47792abfe

Caption: "Spokane yards of the Great Northern at Hillyard in 1946 showed immediately the effects of a nationwide rail strike. Thousands of empty and idle boxcars, oil tankers, gondolas and cattle cars stood on the tracks shortly after the strike was called."

The photo is from a news article titled "Getting There: Hillyard oil contamination puts roadblock in plans for North Spokane Corridor". Here is a link to the article:

http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2016/oct/24/getting-there-hillyard-oil-contamination-puts-road/

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


mikefrommontanan
 

I'd bet it's the result of a bulk coal loading and that the car (on the NKP end) was assigned to such "rough" freight.


Michael Seitz
Missoula MT


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Jim Betz
 

Bill,
  My best guess is that the car has recently sat somewhere that a roof was dumping
filth (run off) on the center of the car but not the ends.  I am not 100% certain but it
looks to me like the dirt is not on the opposite side of the roof (but it is on the
roof walk) ... so perhaps it was due to a gap in the overhang roof on an industrial
siding?

  Nice pic Bob - I haven't seen that one before.  I use a pic of Appleyard in
Wenatchee as my windoze background.  *G*                                                                                         
                                                                                                                    - Jim B.


David Soderblom
 

Bear in mind that 1946 was not a good year to be a freight car. They had been used very heavily during the war, plus many were old anyway as replacements slowed during the 1930s. Pretty much all the cars shown look dirty. A photo taken a decade later would show near-new brightly colored GN boxes with large logos, a very different scene, with only a few of these older cars hanging on.



David Soderblom
Baltimore MD USA
drs@...


Jim Betz
 

David,
  I agree - and disagree with your statement about "a decade later".  The part I disagree with is
the idea that in '56 there would only be a few of the older cars "hanging on".  
  It is certainly true that every smidgeon of deferred maintenance possible was left undone
during the war years and that, cosmetically, all the U.S. railroads equipment looked like
these cars in 1946.  The phrase "looked like they'd been rode hard and put away wet"
comes to mind.  However, mechanical maintenance was not left undone during the war
and many, many of the cars in this picture would have survived a decade or more past
the date of this picture.
  But it is certainly true that the RRs used some (a lot?) of the money they made during
the war to purchase new cars and repaint old ones in their "new" paint schemes (new
in the sense of "compared to the pre-War schemes").  
  However, using just the GN as one example, the introduction of the new paint 
schemes was started in 1948 with a new logo and then, in 1956, was the introduction
of the first cars wearing Vermillion Red ... and from then on the gates were opened to
the Glacier Green cars, and other 'bright/new/modern' paint schemes.  And, looking
at many pictures of yards from the 50's the same was true of "all" RRs.
  
  So your observation is spot on in terms of the affects of the war on the RRs and
their response to them after the war... but it didn't happen quite as early as you feel it
did.
                                                                                                          - Jim B.


Jim Betz
 

Michael,
  It -does- look like coal.  I'm trying to figure out how the car would have gotten that
wide a 'dusting' of coal ... And - that high up on the sides and up onto the roof.
  Wasn't bulk coal loaded using a chute stuck into the car after the open door had
been closed up enough to set the level (weight) of the load?  Does coal being
run thru a chute produce that much dust?  How does bulk coal produce such 
well defined 'limits' outside of the doorway?  That car looks like someone used
an airbrush to simulate the weathering!  *G*
                                                                                                 - Jim B.


Jim Betz
 


  ... and can anyone shed any light on the source of the white streak to the right
      of the door on that same NKP car?

  Is it possible that this white streak could be related to the black smear?
                                                                                                                    - Jim B.


Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 10/19/2018 6:21 AM, Jim Betz wrote:
  ... and can anyone shed any light on the source of the white streak to the right
      of the door on that same NKP car?

    Just a SWAG but the remains of a grain door?

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

On Fri, Oct 19, 2018 at 08:18 AM, Jon Miller wrote:
  ... and can anyone shed any light on the source of the white streak to the right
      of the door on that same NKP car?

    Just a SWAG but the remains of a grain door?


Likely the remnants of a paper lining which got caught behind the door as it was opened, folding it back against the car side. I don't believe the dark splotch is coal dust, which doesn't stick all that well. I'd be more inclined to think it's carbon black, which is akin to soot; finer than frog fur and sticky. I also don't think the splotch occurred during loading; note the area that would be behind the open door is weathered just as heavily as the door itself. I suspect the car was standing, door closed, outside an open loading door, where a very dusty bagging operation was taking place. The open loading door acted as a mask of sorts, keeping the dust cloud confined to only a portion of the car. This could have occurred either before the car was loaded, or after it was loaded and the door close, as the bagging continued to load other cars down the line.

How dirty did it get in carbon black plants? Go here and scroll down for the photographer's account of making the images.

Dennis Storzek

 


Douglas Harding
 

I would concur with Dennis, it looks like the car was standing next to an opening, where a black dusty product was being handled.

The white “streak” appears to be part of a paper grain door, or paper seal for some other product.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, October 19, 2018 11:04 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] GN Spokane Hillyard Yard Photo

 

On Fri, Oct 19, 2018 at 08:18 AM, Jon Miller wrote:

  ... and can anyone shed any light on the source of the white streak to the right
      of the door on that same NKP car?

    Just a SWAG but the remains of a grain door?


Likely the remnants of a paper lining which got caught behind the door as it was opened, folding it back against the car side. I don't believe the dark splotch is coal dust, which doesn't stick all that well. I'd be more inclined to think it's carbon black, which is akin to soot; finer than frog fur and sticky. I also don't think the splotch occurred during loading; note the area that would be behind the open door is weathered just as heavily as the door itself. I suspect the car was standing, door closed, outside an open loading door, where a very dusty bagging operation was taking place. The open loading door acted as a mask of sorts, keeping the dust cloud confined to only a portion of the car. This could have occurred either before the car was loaded, or after it was loaded and the door close, as the bagging continued to load other cars down the line.

How dirty did it get in carbon black plants? Go here and scroll down for the photographer's account of making the images.

Dennis Storzek

 


Tim O'Connor
 

Or... maybe the car was parked on an overpass for a few days or even weeks
where steam locomotives were passing below and belching soot and smoke straight
up onto the car side...

I remember as a kid the effects of industrial pollution on automobiles - for a
while in the 1960's they made cars with these black plastic coatings over hardtops
and my friend's Dad worked for Tenneco Chemical and in less than two years that
plastic just dissolved from the stuff raining down on his car in the parking lot.
And the car's paint didn't fare any better!

And I recall a picture in a railroad book of a two year old steel box car on
Sherman Hill in the 1940's with completely corroded sides. Again, probably parked
for a while near some belching industrial plant. It was a far dirtier world in
those days!

Tim O'



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Jim Betz
 

Dennis,
  When I enlarge the picture that white streak doesn't -seem- to be paper.  I'm not saying it
isn't just to be argumentative ... I'm asking again "what is it?" after trying to confirm yours
and Jon's suspicions.  It's location makes me agree with you ... but the image itself doesn't
"fit" with that explanation (in my mind/with my eyes).
                                                                                                                        - Jim B..


rwitt_2000
 

On Fri, Oct 19, 2018 at 09:10 AM, Jim Betz wrote:
However, mechanical maintenance was not left undone during the war
and many, many of the cars in this picture would have survived a decade or more past
the date of this picture
If one looks at the NKP being discussed one can see all the repairs to the running boards from the evidence of fresh boards. This would be a safety requirement not just mechanical.

Bob Witt

A very nice photo indeed


Doug Paasch
 

That white streak has me puzzled, too.  And if you blow up the picture, down at the bottom of the white streak is a blob of something that looks like a naked chicken.  Something oozing out of the car?  You can see where the naked chicken looks like some kind of goo and appears to be on the sill and stretches down and touches the ground.  Weird.

Doug Paasch


Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Bob, et al.,
 
I’ve studying the 1946 GN Hillyard yard on and off since the link was posted several days ago.  There are two odd looking (to me anyway) cars, the first at the left end of the sixth string of cars from the camera, and the second just to the left of the first on the next track back. 
 
The first car is a single sheathed boxcar with its door open.  It is similar to a USRA boxcar, but it has on four diagonal braces rather than the usual eight diagonal braces.
 
The second car looks like a boxcar with what appear to be four windows cut into the side, and perhaps no roof (a coke car maybe?).
 
Anyone have any idea what either of these two cars might be?
 
Thanks,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 
From: Bob Chaparro
Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2018 10:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] GN Spokane Hillyard Yard Photo
 

With a little photo editing this becomes a nice period photo of a lot of freight cars:

https://media.spokesman.com/photos/2016/10/24/spa68298.JPG_t1170.jpg?e2225bc5c1a75a1036ca3021fecba2b47792abfe

Caption: "Spokane yards of the Great Northern at Hillyard in 1946 showed immediately the effects of a nationwide rail strike. Thousands of empty and idle boxcars, oil tankers, gondolas and cattle cars stood on the tracks shortly after the strike was called."

The photo is from a news article titled "Getting There: Hillyard oil contamination puts roadblock in plans for North Spokane Corridor". Here is a link to the article:

http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2016/oct/24/getting-there-hillyard-oil-contamination-puts-road/

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA