Topics

Floquil Glaze


Jerry Michels
 

Hi James, I have used Clear Coat as a top coat also.  Jerry


Jerry Michels
 

well they do say visual acuity worsens with age.. 

touche Tim !☺ 


James E Kubanick
 

Jerry,

I have used Floquil Glaze as a base coat for decals and Clear Clear as a topcoat as the latter seems to have a very good ability to hide the edges of thick film decals

On Friday, November 2, 2018, 5:47:26 PM EDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



Jerry Michels wrote
> Curious Tim, I have returned paint to the bottle for over 40 years, and it has never been a problem.

well they do say visual acuity worsens with age...

Once I began using Scalecoat and Accupaint I never went back to Floquil for overall
paint jobs. I use it for roofs, underframes, weathering, hopper car and gondola interiors,
structures, and washes, but never when I need a glossy smooth finish. YMMV.

Tim

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 


Jerry Michels wrote
> Curious Tim, I have returned paint to the bottle for over 40 years, and it has never been a problem.

well they do say visual acuity worsens with age...

Once I began using Scalecoat and Accupaint I never went back to Floquil for overall
paint jobs. I use it for roofs, underframes, weathering, hopper car and gondola interiors,
structures, and washes, but never when I need a glossy smooth finish. YMMV.

Tim

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Jerry Michels
 

Curious Tim, I have returned paint to the bottle for over 40 years, and it has never been a problem.  Some of the original jars I have with "returned" pain is still good after at least 20 years.  In fact I used some just this week.

To the question, Floquil Glaze can be added to a paint mix to give a gloss finish, or can be used on its own, sprayed on a surface to give a gloss surface for decals, and also used to blend in decals as an overcoat.  Glaze is a bit yellowish.  Floquil also made a similar product called Crystal Clear, that was completely clear.  I suppose it might have been an improvement to Glaze, but have no factual basis that is was.  

It is rather interesting to be discussing Floquil's history and uses.  Kind of makes me realize I have been in this hobby a long, long time!

Jerry Michels


Mark Vinski
 

I believe glaze was meant to be added to Floquil paint to produce a glossy finish I have used it that way.

Mark Vinski


Tim O'Connor
 


Because Floquil is an enamel, it can slowly polymerize in the bottle... this is what
causes the graininess. It also happens to acrylic enamels. In each case the best way
to prevent it is to measure out the paint you're going to use, and throw out any left
overs, and never return any paint to the original bottle.

But, absent those problems, then adding thinner should make it flow again. A couple
drops of retarder helps too.

When the paint gets grainy I keep them but only as brush paint and washes for weathering.
Never try to airbrush them. It won't be pretty!

Tim O'



I have a stash of this material, which at one time was identified as Floquil paint without any pigment, i.e. only the carrier and solvent.  Does anyone know whether or not this is true?  

If so, I am wondering whether or notGlaze  could be used to reconstitute Floquil paints that seemed to be too  reduced  by evaporation (how does that happen when the lid is on right….?).  I have been successful in soome instances by just adding solvent (lacquer thinner or Diosol), but too often this ends up with a degraded grainy paint.  I am very much aware that older Floquil paints craze styrene. Of course, I could simply try and see what happens.

I find that the older more colorful Floquil paints still have their good uses.

Denny S. Anspach, MD

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

I have a stash of this material, which at one time was identified as Floquil paint without any pigment, i.e. only the carrier and solvent. Does anyone know whether or not this is true?

If so, I am wondering whether or notGlaze could be used to reconstitute Floquil paints that seemed to be too reduced by evaporation (how does that happen when the lid is on right….?). I have been successful in some instances by just adding solvent (lacquer thinner or Diosol), but too often this ends up with a degraded grainy paint. I am very much aware that older Floquil paints craze styrene. Of course, I could simply try and see what happens.

I find that the older more colorful Floquil paints still have their good uses.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864