Cleaning Boxcar Interiors


Bob Chaparro
 

Circa 1960 photos from the Hagley Digital Archives.

http://digital.hagley.org/PRR_22173?solr_nav%5Bid%5D=1436ce8ab65b17dd9f25&solr_nav%5Bpage%5D=32&solr_nav%5Boffset%5D=19

http://digital.hagley.org/PRR_22169?solr_nav%5Bid%5D=87ae45d5522ad37765e0&solr_nav%5Bpage%5D=43&solr_nav%5Boffset%5D=10

It appears neither car is on the expected clean-out track, that is, a track with an elevated rail to allow debris to slide out of the car.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Richard Townsend
 

No one would believe you if you modeled one of those vacuums.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Nov 27, 2018 8:41 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Cleaning Boxcar Interiors

Circa 1960 photos from the Hagley Digital Archives.
It appears neither car is on the expected clean-out track, that is, a track with an elevated rail to allow debris to slide out of the car.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Bob,

I have seen several different clean-out tracks on different railroads, and I have never seen one that tilted cars to the side to allow debris to slide out of the car.  Most of the stuff that I saw as a clerk that needed cleaning out of boxcars would not have just slid out the door, unless it was grain leavings.  On the railroad I worked for, the RIP and clean-out tracks were one and the same, and they were level.  The car cleaners used carts to dispose of the debris from cars that needed cleaning ... everything from dunnage in gondolas to full reefer loads of rotten tomatoes.  I suppose there might be tilted tracks somewhere - can you give a specific instance?

Todd Sullivan.


Richard Townsend
 

But if you wanted to, you could start with a dollhouse shop vac: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Dollhouse-Shop-Vac/165924104

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Townsend via Groups.Io <richtownsend@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Nov 27, 2018 9:25 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Cleaning Boxcar Interiors

No one would believe you if you modeled one of those vacuums.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Nov 27, 2018 8:41 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Cleaning Boxcar Interiors

Circa 1960 photos from the Hagley Digital Archives.
It appears neither car is on the expected clean-out track, that is, a track with an elevated rail to allow debris to slide out of the car.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


brianleppert@att.net
 

I was only a teenager back then, but in the railroad freight yard just south of downtown Seattle, with NP, MILW, GN and Pacific Coast tracks, I remember seeing a tilted track with boxcars with their doors open and debris on the ground.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Andy Laurent
 

On Tue, Nov 27, 2018 at 11:53 AM, brianleppert@... wrote:
I was only a teenager back then, but in the railroad freight yard just south of downtown Seattle, with NP, MILW, GN and Pacific Coast tracks, I remember seeing a tilted track with boxcars with their doors open and debris on the ground.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV
C&NW had a similar arrangement with two parallel tilted clean out tracks at their yard in Green Bay, Wisc...for cleaning out boxcars that were in paper service, etc.  They were about 20 cars long, immediately south of their enginehouse. I believe it was in use until the WC took over decades after the horizon of this group.  Most smaller steam-era terminals would have used a RIP track, or something less intensive.

Andy
Iowa


Larry Buell
 

In the early 1980’s we were still cleaning out boxcars at Chicago (Corwith Yard) on the Santa Fe.  We had two dedicated cleanout tracks in what we call the Junction Yard just east of the Nerska Crossing (MP 7.3, with the BRC).  Both tracks were super elevated a couple of inches, so, that they would drain towards a common paved roadway.  My “cleaning track” section gang of about 8-10 laborers, asst. foreman and foreman was responsible for cleaning out the dunnage in cars that came from the freight houses.  After the dunnage was removed, the inside of the boxes was steam cleaned.  This practice ceased (1983-84) when the Santa Fe decided that the customer would be responsible for car cleaning.

Larry Buell


Bob Chaparro
 

Here are examples of a clean-out tracks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Todd Sullivan
 

Wow!  Thanks to Bob, Larry and others for all the interesting information and photos on tilted clean-out tracks.  I learned a lot!

Todd Sullivan