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Photo: UTLX 81014


Bob Chaparro
 

A photo with very good resolution of tank car UTLX 81014 from the University of Kentucky Digital Archives:

http://kdl.kyvl.org/catalog/xt702v2c8t1s_2661_1 (Loads Slow)

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Caption: "Mr. Bond; railroad freight car, Sistrunk,, 1934".

I'm no expert on tank cars but the hatches on the domes and car body seem different from those on conventional tank cars. Yes? No?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Dave Parker
 

As per Steve Hile's book, it's an "experimental dry hopper car".  One of a group of 16, originally a conventional Class V car. 

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Bruce Smith
 

Interesting photo. In addition to this experimental dry hopper conversion, there is a very early covered hopper, reefers from PFE, MDT and FGE and maybe UTX/MILW, as well as all the other neat activity.


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

On Dec 5, 2018, at 11:38 AM, Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@verizon.net<mailto:chiefbobbb@verizon.net>> wrote:

A photo with very good resolution of tank car UTLX 81014 from the University of Kentucky Digital Archives:
http://kdl.kyvl.org/catalog/xt702v2c8t1s_2661_1 (Loads Slow)
This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.
Caption: "Mr. Bond; railroad freight car, Sistrunk,, 1934".
I'm no expert on tank cars but the hatches on the domes and car body seem different from those on conventional tank cars. Yes? No?
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


David
 

We've discussed the UTLX car before. The covered hopper looks to me like a B&O N-13 from the end.

https://imgur.com/a/FezS97k

David Thompson


rwitt_2000
 

On Wed, Dec 5, 2018 at 03:31 PM, David wrote:
The covered hopper looks to me like a B&O N-13 from the end.

https://imgur.com/a/FezS97k
David,

Yes it does. The covered hopper versions were B&O class N-25.

Also notice small volume of the gravel loads in the twin hoppers.


Bob Witt


Steve and Barb Hile
 

In fact, we used this very same photo in the book.
 
Steve Hile



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Parker via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, December 05, 2018 12:01 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: UTLX 81014

As per Steve Hile's book, it's an "experimental dry hopper car".  One of a group of 16, originally a conventional Class V car. 

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Paul Woods <paul@...>
 

I noticed on the PFE reefer, just above the middle on R/H side in this photo, a distinct shadow around the Southern Pacific logo.  I recall reading an article in a RMC mag on PFE cars that mentioned sheet-metal logos that were eventually done away with due to issues with them sometimes falling off - I think the story goes that a passenger on a passing train was injured when air turbulence tore a loose logo off....lawsuits are often very effective at motivating change!  Can someone clue me up as to roughly when the change to painted-on logos started?

I am trying to plan a reefer build (in 1/32 scale) and my chosen period is pre-Depression.  Making the decals would get a bit easier if I can print the logos on photo paper to get the raised sheet-metal effect, quite apart from the fact that it is an interesting detail to replicate.

Thanks & regards
Paul Woods

Whangarei, NZ
NYCSHS #7172


Tony Thompson
 

Paul Woods wrote:

I noticed on the PFE reefer, just above the middle on R/H side in this photo, a distinct shadow around the Southern Pacific logo.  I recall reading an article in a RMC mag on PFE cars that mentioned sheet-metal logos that were eventually done away with due to issues with them sometimes falling off - I think the story goes that a passenger on a passing train was injured when air turbulence tore a loose logo off....lawsuits are often very effective at motivating change!  Can someone clue me up as to roughly when the change to painted-on logos started?

      I wrote that RMC article (and most of an entire book about PFE cars). The metal medallions were introduced in 1928 and began to be removed in 1937. By 1940, nearly all of them had been removed. The person NEARLY injured was on the ground, narrowly missed by a falling medallion. Nothing to do with a passenger train.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Paul Woods <paul@...>
 

Thanks for that, Tony.  I have done some digging and figured out why my recollection was wide of the mark - I was confusing the falling reefer medallion with an incident in the UK of a passenger being injured on a train when the smoke deflector of a passing locomotive came loose.  Apparently I have too many railroad/railway interests and not enough filing cabinets upstairs to keep all the information organised!

Regards
Paul Woods

Whangarei, NZ