Photo: Transformer Load


Bob Chaparro
 

Tarped transformer on a flat car (Southern Pacific?):

https://picryl.com/media/interphase-transformer-from-westinghouse-loaded-on-train-flat-car-photograph-415445

Click on the photo to enlarge it and then scroll to enlarge it further.

Caption: "Interphase transformer from Westinghouse, loaded on train flat car. Photograph taken January 24, 1950."

Good detail of how the rods securing the load are routed through the stake pockets and held in place. These stake pockets appear to be different from the others.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Gary Roe
 

Is that an Owl Mountain Flat Car?

gary roe
quincy, illinois




On ‎Saturday‎, ‎December‎ ‎8‎, ‎2018‎ ‎03‎:‎01‎:‎02‎ ‎PM‎ ‎CST, Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Tarped transformer on a flat car (Southern Pacific?):

https://picryl.com/media/interphase-transformer-from-westinghouse-loaded-on-train-flat-car-photograph-415445

Click on the photo to enlarge it and then scroll to enlarge it further.

Caption: "Interphase transformer from Westinghouse, loaded on train flat car. Photograph taken January 24, 1950."

Good detail of how the rods securing the load are routed through the stake pockets and held in place. These stake pockets appear to be different from the others.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Jim Gates
 

If you try to download it from that site they want a "donation", but if you copy the caption, click on the link https://catalog.archives.gov/, and search for the caption you will find two photos. The second search result was this photo. The first is a closer shot that does give some more detail. From this I could verify that it is SP 4136x. This photo also has two ATSF Fe cars and shows the second floor of a Santa Fe freight house. I would guess Berkley or Oakland.

Jim Gates

--------------------------------------------

On Sat, 12/8/18, Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@verizon.net> wrote:

Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Transformer Load
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: Saturday, December 8, 2018, 3:00 PM

Tarped transformer on a flat car (Southern Pacific?):
https://picryl.com/media/interphase-transformer-from-westinghouse-loaded-on-train-flat-car-photograph-415445
Click on the photo to enlarge it and then scroll to enlarge it further.
Caption: "Interphase transformer from Westinghouse, loaded on train flat car. Photograph taken January 24,
1950."
Good detail of how the rods securing the load are routed through the stake pockets and held in place. These stake pockets
appear to be different from the others.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


David Soderblom
 

Note the poor condition of the tarp, which appears to be canvas covered with a thick paint. Has the car been set out to check for damage? The ATSF box coupled to it has a sheet of something under the door that would interfere with movement.

The Rutland car the other day had its pockets bolted to the side sill, not riveted, which seems odd.

In any case the shipper seems to have modified the car. I wonder what SP’s reaction was once they figured it out.


Tim O'Connor
 


Appears to kave KC brakes too.

Tim O'



Tarped transformer on a flat car (Southern Pacific?):
https://picryl.com/media/interphase-transformer-from-westinghouse-loaded-on-train-flat-car-photograph-415445
Caption: "Interphase transformer from Westinghouse, loaded on train flat car. Photograph taken January 24, 1950."
Good detail of how the rods securing the load are routed through the stake pockets and held in place. These stake pockets appear to be different from the others.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 


SP F-50-5, Ralston 1916. Has Vulcan trucks.


Tarped transformer on a flat car (Southern Pacific?):
https://picryl.com/media/interphase-transformer-from-westinghouse-loaded-on-train-flat-car-photograph-415445
Click on the photo to enlarge it and then scroll to enlarge it further.
Caption: "Interphase transformer from Westinghouse, loaded on train flat car. Photograph taken January 24, 1950."
Good detail of how the rods securing the load are routed through the stake pockets and held in place. These stake pockets appear to be different from the others.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 

Jim

Most web sites that try to "copy protect" images are actively deceiving their
clients or deceiving themselves. In any case the general rule is: if you can SEE
a full size image on your screen, then it can be downloaded intact. Some browsers
make this a lot easier than others. I use Firefox, and it's very easy.

Tim O'

If you try to download it from that site they want a "donation", but if you copy the caption, click on the link https://catalog.archives.gov/, and search for the caption you will find two photos. The second search result was this photo. The first is a closer shot that does give some more detail. From this I could verify that it is SP 4136x. This photo also has two ATSF Fe cars and shows the second floor of a Santa Fe freight house. I would guess Berkley or Oakland.

Jim Gates

--------------------------------------------
On Sat, 12/8/18, Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@verizon.net> wrote:

Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Transformer Load
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: Saturday, December 8, 2018, 3:00 PM

Tarped transformer on a flat car (Southern Pacific?):
https://picryl.com/media/interphase-transformer-from-westinghouse-loaded-on-train-flat-car-photograph-415445
Click on the photo to enlarge it and then scroll to enlarge it further.
Caption: "Interphase transformer from Westinghouse, loaded on train flat car. Photograph taken January 24,
1950."
Good detail of how the rods securing the load are routed through the stake pockets and held in place. These stake pockets
appear to be different from the others.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Rod Miller
 

Is it not very bad practice to place a heavy load at
one end of a car instead of centering it? Since the scene
may be a bad order track, improper positioning of the load
could be the cause for the car being there.

Of course there may have been a second transformer at
the other end of the car, but there is no evidence
(dunnage) that one had been there and was unloaded recently.

There must be a good explanation since it is difficult to
understand why that load was allowed to leave the factory.

--
Rod Miller
Handcraftsman
===
Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives, | O Scale/S Scale West/Narrow Gauge West
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More | 2019 O Scale National Convention
http://www.rodmiller.com | 2019 Dates Are May 23 - 25
| http://www.oscalewest.com


Nelson Moyer
 

Only original and high definition downloads require a donation. Medium and lower defination do not require a donation.

Nelson Moyer

On Dec 8, 2018, at 3:49 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:

Jim

Most web sites that try to "copy protect" images are actively deceiving their
clients or deceiving themselves. In any case the general rule is: if you can SEE
a full size image on your screen, then it can be downloaded intact. Some browsers
make this a lot easier than others. I use Firefox, and it's very easy.

Tim O'


If you try to download it from that site they want a "donation", but if you copy the caption, click on the link https://catalog.archives.gov/, and search for the caption you will find two photos. The second search result was this photo. The first is a closer shot that does give some more detail. From this I could verify that it is SP 4136x. This photo also has two ATSF Fe cars and shows the second floor of a Santa Fe freight house. I would guess Berkley or Oakland.

Jim Gates

--------------------------------------------
On Sat, 12/8/18, Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@verizon.net> wrote:

Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Transformer Load
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: Saturday, December 8, 2018, 3:00 PM

Tarped transformer on a flat car (Southern Pacific?):
https://picryl.com/media/interphase-transformer-from-westinghouse-loaded-on-train-flat-car-photograph-415445
Click on the photo to enlarge it and then scroll to enlarge it further.
Caption: "Interphase transformer from Westinghouse, loaded on train flat car. Photograph taken January 24,
1950."
Good detail of how the rods securing the load are routed through the stake pockets and held in place. These stake pockets
appear to be different from the others.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*



<sp_41356 40ft_flat F-50-5 RALSTON-1916 Vulcan trucks Westinghouse interphase-transformer-load 1-24-1950.jpg>


Nelson Moyer
 

It’s not uncommon to see one or two heavy loads positioned over the trucks, especially on low tonnage rating flat cars. Transformers are heavy, hence the positioning over a truck.

Nelson Moyer

On Dec 8, 2018, at 4:08 PM, Rod Miller <rod@rodmiller.com> wrote:

Is it not very bad practice to place a heavy load at
one end of a car instead of centering it? Since the scene
may be a bad order track, improper positioning of the load
could be the cause for the car being there.

Of course there may have been a second transformer at
the other end of the car, but there is no evidence
(dunnage) that one had been there and was unloaded recently.

There must be a good explanation since it is difficult to
understand why that load was allowed to leave the factory.

--
Rod Miller
Handcraftsman
===
Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives, | O Scale/S Scale West/Narrow Gauge West
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More | 2019 O Scale National Convention
http://www.rodmiller.com | 2019 Dates Are May 23 - 25
| http://www.oscalewest.com



John Barry
 

By sheet, are you referring to the large trapezoidal vertical that extends nearly to the railhead?  If so, that "sheet" is in fact one of the four fishbelly channels that make up the underframe of the Fe-16 class 50' XAR.  The 100 car class was re-built from double sheathed Fe-K/M cars in 1937.


John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736


On Saturday, December 8, 2018, 5:05:47 PM EST, David Soderblom <drs@...> wrote:


Note the poor condition of the tarp, which appears to be canvas covered with a thick paint. Has the car been set out to check for damage?  The ATSF box coupled to it has a sheet of something under the door that would interfere with movement.

The Rutland car the other day had its pockets bolted to the side sill, not riveted, which seems odd.

In any case the shipper seems to have modified the car. I wonder what SP’s reaction was once they figured it out.




Bruce Smith
 

Rod,

Much to the contrary, this is absolutely the correct way to load a flat car. There were very few flat cars that could take the entire load limit in the center of the span (the PRR F22 being one). The loading information for most flat cars required heavy loads to be loaded off center. I was all set to post that this was a great example of just that when your post appeared ;) So bottom line, I highly doubt that the location of the lading is the issue or that there was another transformer at the other end of the car. More modelers need to model loads in this manner!

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Rod Miller <rod@rodmiller.com>
Sent: Saturday, December 8, 2018 6:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Transformer Load

Is it not very bad practice to place a heavy load at
one end of a car instead of centering it? Since the scene
may be a bad order track, improper positioning of the load
could be the cause for the car being there.

Of course there may have been a second transformer at
the other end of the car, but there is no evidence
(dunnage) that one had been there and was unloaded recently.

There must be a good explanation since it is difficult to
understand why that load was allowed to leave the factory.

--
Rod Miller
Handcraftsman
===
Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives, | O Scale/S Scale West/Narrow Gauge West
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More | 2019 O Scale National Convention
http://www.rodmiller.com | 2019 Dates Are May 23 - 25
| http://www.oscalewest.com


Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 


Hi Jim and List Members,
 
The site Jim referenced https://catalog.archives.gov/ has some cool railroad photos. See below for a Clinchfeld USRA single sheathed boxcar.
 
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, December 08, 2018 4:51 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Transformer Load

If you try to download it from that site they want a "donation", but if you copy the caption, click on the link https://catalog.archives.gov/, and search for the caption you will find two photos.  The second search result was this photo.  The first is a closer shot that does give some more detail.  From this I could verify that it is SP 4136x.  This photo also has two ATSF Fe cars and shows the second floor of a Santa Fe freight house.  I would guess Berkley or Oakland.

Jim Gates

--------------------------------------------
On Sat, 12/8/18, Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

 Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Transformer Load
 To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
 Date: Saturday, December 8, 2018, 3:00 PM
 
 Tarped transformer on a flat car (Southern Pacific?):
 https://picryl.com/media/interphase-transformer-from-westinghouse-loaded-on-train-flat-car-photograph-415445
 Click on the photo to enlarge it and then scroll to enlarge it further.
 Caption: "Interphase transformer from Westinghouse, loaded on train flat car. Photograph taken January 24,
 1950."
 Good detail of how the rods securing the load are routed through the stake pockets and held in place. These stake pockets
 appear to be different from the others.
 Bob Chaparro
 Hemet, CA




Tony Thompson
 

Rod Miller wrote:

Is it not very bad practice to place a heavy load at
one end of a car instead of centering it?
Au contraire. The center of the car is actually the WORST place, relatively speaking. Over a truck is ideal.

Tony Thompson
tony@signaturepress.com


Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Sorry, Tony, but in this case I have to humbly disagree with you on this. While theoretically, placing the load over one truck might be considered ideal, in reality what this accomplices is it places the entire load over one truck instead of splitting it between two (or more) trucks. Additionally, any benefit that comes from removing moment by placing the entire load over one truck is offset by the increase in moment felt by the other truck. When loads were placed over one truck, invariably, loads were actually placed over both trucks, which was the usual practice.
So, please recognize that the engineers who designed these cars really knew what they were doing when they designed these cars to be loaded in the center.

Bill Daniels, P.E.

On Dec 9, 2018, at 11:02 AM, Tony Thompson <tony@signaturepress.com> wrote:

Rod Miller wrote:

Is it not very bad practice to place a heavy load at
one end of a car instead of centering it?
Au contraire. The center of the car is actually the WORST place, relatively speaking. Over a truck is ideal.

Tony Thompson
tony@signaturepress.com






Tony Thompson
 

Bill Daniels wrote:

Sorry, Tony, but in this case I have to humbly disagree with you on this. While theoretically, placing the load over one truck might be considered ideal, in reality what this accomplices is it places the entire load over one truck instead of splitting it between two (or more) trucks. Additionally, any benefit that comes from removing moment by placing the entire load over one truck is offset by the increase in moment felt by the other truck. When loads were placed over one truck, invariably, loads were actually placed over both trucks, which was the usual practice.
So, please recognize that the engineers who designed these cars really knew what they were doing when they designed these cars to be loaded in the center.
For a SINGLE load, especially a heavy one, I take your point. But when there are two loads, they do go over the trucks. And lots of flat cars, including a whole raft of SP ones, were lettered with warning labels about the amount of concentrated load in the car center. So yes, those designers largely knew what they were doing, and they WARNED shippers not to put too heavy a load in the center. That may well have been the case for this transformer.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Bruce Smith
 

Bill,

As I noted in my previous post, it was actually quite rare for a flat car to be rated to carry its maximum load and the center of the span. One of the few was the PRR F22 gun flat. Most flat cars could only carry a portion of their load limit weight at the center of the span. The amount of weigh allowed increased with increasing distance from the centerline. This is actually true for most railroad cars, but other types were rarely loaded with the load in the center so it was less of an issue. However, there are certainly examples of box cars with a maximal load in the door area simply folding in half ;)

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bill Daniels via Groups.Io <billinsf=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, December 9, 2018 1:14 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Transformer Load

Sorry, Tony, but in this case I have to humbly disagree with you on this. While theoretically, placing the load over one truck might be considered ideal, in reality what this accomplices is it places the entire load over one truck instead of splitting it between two (or more) trucks. Additionally, any benefit that comes from removing moment by placing the entire load over one truck is offset by the increase in moment felt by the other truck. When loads were placed over one truck, invariably, loads were actually placed over both trucks, which was the usual practice.
So, please recognize that the engineers who designed these cars really knew what they were doing when they designed these cars to be loaded in the center.

Bill Daniels, P.E.
On Dec 9, 2018, at 11:02 AM, Tony Thompson <tony@signaturepress.com> wrote:

Rod Miller wrote:

Is it not very bad practice to place a heavy load at
one end of a car instead of centering it?
Au contraire. The center of the car is actually the WORST place, relatively speaking. Over a truck is ideal.

Tony Thompson
tony@signaturepress.com