L&N USRA gondolas


Tony Thompson
 

I know that L&N received 1000 USRA drop-bottom gondolas, numbered 74000-74999, and by 1923 had acquired 1000 more with identical dimensions, 73000-73999. Were the second group in fact USRA clones? Their identical dimensions suggest that, but I'd like to know before undertaking modeling. Thanks for any help.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Benjamin Hom
 

Tony Thompson asked:
"I know that L&N received 1000 USRA drop-bottom gondolas, numbered 74000-74999, and by 1923 had acquired 1000 more with identical dimensions, 73000-73999. Were the second group in fact USRA clones? Their identical dimensions suggest that, but I'd like to know before undertaking modeling."

These were copies of the USRA composite design built 1922-1923 by the Chickasaw Shipbuilding and Car Company of Fairfield, Alabama.


Ben Hom


Tony Thompson
 

Thanks, Ben.
Tony


On Jan 16, 2019, at 7:10 PM, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:

Tony Thompson asked:
"I know that L&N received 1000 USRA drop-bottom gondolas, numbered 74000-74999, and by 1923 had acquired 1000 more with identical dimensions, 73000-73999. Were the second group in fact USRA clones? Their identical dimensions suggest that, but I'd like to know before undertaking modeling."

These were copies of the USRA composite design built 1922-1923 by the Chickasaw Shipbuilding and Car Company of Fairfield, Alabama.


Ben Hom


Bill Welch
 
Edited

This is one of those situations where I am not sure if copy or clone fit as the Chickasaw built cars were identical to the USRA gons with two exceptions:

—they did not have the diagonal braces on the end panels
—unlike the USRA delivery that rode on Andrews trucks, they rode on what we often call "cast side frame" trucks

My authority or reference for this information is a rendering of the car in a Chickasaw advertisement. Attached are photos of my pair. I used Evergreen Styrene for the sides because I think it looks better. The Sill Steps are A-Line heated in a flame and re-bent for a more accurate profile. "AB" brake parts are Detail Associates/Grandt Line while the Retainer Valve on the "B" end is Precision Scale. I also used the very fine Tichy corner gusset parts. NBW's are Detail Associates. The use of the small Evergreen rectangles and harvested rivets along the sills is based on the Chickasaw drawing and a circa 1939 photo of an L&N USRA composite gon. I only realized after I made the attached photos that I failed to brush off the construction debris. Hopefully the photos are self-explanatory.

Bill Welch


O Fenton Wells
 

Excellent modeling as usual Bill, thanks for sharing
Fenton

On Thu, Jan 17, 2019 at 7:11 AM Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:
This is one of those situations where I am not sure if copy or clone fit as the Chickasaw built cars were identical to the USRA gons with two exceptions:

—they did not have the diagonal braces on the end panels
—unlike the USRA delivery that rode on Andrews trucks, they rode on what we often call "cast side frame" trucks

My authority or reference for this information is a rendering of the car in a Chickasaw advertisement. Attached are photos of my pair. I used Evergreen Styrene for the sides because I think it looks better. The Sill Steps are A-Line heated in a flame and re-bent for a more accurate profile. "AB" brake parts are Detail Associates/Grandt Line while the Retainer Valve on the "B" end is Precision Scale. I also used the very fine Tichy corner gusset parts. The use of the small Evergreen rectangles and harvested rivets along the sills is based on the Chickasaw drawing and a circa 1939 photo of an L&N USRA composite gon. I only realized after I made the attached photos that I failed to brush off the construction debris. Hopefully the photos are self-explanatory.

Bill Welch



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


gtws00
 

That's some great modeling Bill.
George Toman