Topics

Modeling a Lever Hand Brake


Bruce Griffin
 

Friends,

Can anyone point me to an HO scale detail part to comes close to this brake lever type?  This is from a B&O O-48 Gondola that started life on the BR&P. Also not sure about the true name of this type of handle for the brake mechnanism. Thank you.

Best Regards,
Bruce Griffin
Ashland, MD


Tim O'Connor
 


Sunshine offered this lever hand brake in their Greenville gondola kits, and probably with other kits too.
And Proto 2000 offered a version with their Greenville gondolas.


On 1/20/2019 9:58 PM, Bruce Griffin via Groups.Io wrote:
Friends,

Can anyone point me to an HO scale detail part to comes close to this brake lever type?  This is from a B&O O-48 Gondola that started life on the BR&P. Also not sure about the true name of this type of handle for the brake mechnanism. Thank you.

Best Regards,
Bruce Griffin
Ashland, MD

Attachments:


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Bruce Griffin
 

Tim,

Thank you, I have one to the Proto 2000 cars in the stash.

Regards,
Bruce


John Sykes III
 

Not sure (they are in one of my parts drawers) but I think it was Moloco that I ordered a bunch of different lever hand brakes from.  Or maybe it was Tangent, but I know I have about 4 or 5 different styles.

-- John


Rich C
 

On Tuesday, January 22, 2019, 8:20:56 PM CST, John Sykes III via Groups.Io <johnsykesiii@...> wrote:


Not sure (they are in one of my parts drawers) but I think it was Moloco that I ordered a bunch of different lever hand brakes from.  Or maybe it was Tangent, but I know I have about 4 or 5 different styles.

-- John


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Moloco.  Nice parts.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Sykes III via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 9:21 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling a Lever Hand Brake

 

Not sure (they are in one of my parts drawers) but I think it was Moloco that I ordered a bunch of different lever hand brakes from.  Or maybe it was Tangent, but I know I have about 4 or 5 different styles.

-- John


Dennis Storzek
 

On Tue, Jan 22, 2019 at 06:58 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
Moloco.  Nice parts. 

Where? This is all I see

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1032/8967/products/file_15_1024x1024.jpeg?v=1445453443

The only "lever" I see is a modern Minor pump style lever gear. Am I missing something?

The modern lever brakes have are high power brakes where one pumps the lever up and down to wind in the chain. The question was about the old rotary motion hand brakes, where one lifted the lever, then swung it from side to side, using the pawl and ratchet to hold tension while the handle was reset for another pull. Not the same thing at all. One of the original photos asked about appeared to be the Blackall style used on the USRA "government" cars. The other, with the enclosed handle on the lever, appears to be a Miner product. As far as I know neither is currently made, although Accurail had the Blackall style in their USRA hopper set years ago.

Dennis Storzek


Tim O'Connor
 


Nice! And very economical too. :-)


On 1/22/2019 9:41 PM, Rich C via Groups.Io wrote:
On Tuesday, January 22, 2019, 8:20:56 PM CST, John Sykes III via Groups.Io <johnsykesiii@...> wrote:


Not sure (they are in one of my parts drawers) but I think it was Moloco that I ordered a bunch of different lever hand brakes from.  Or maybe it was Tangent, but I know I have about 4 or 5 different styles.

-- John



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


WILLIAM PARDIE
 

This is my observation as well.  I am also seeking the rotary type.

Bill Pardie.


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
Date: 1/23/19 8:40 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling a Lever Hand Brake

On Tue, Jan 22, 2019 at 06:58 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
Moloco.  Nice parts. 

Where? This is all I see

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1032/8967/products/file_15_1024x1024.jpeg?v=1445453443

The only "lever" I see is a modern Minor pump style lever gear. Am I missing something?

The modern lever brakes have are high power brakes where one pumps the lever up and down to wind in the chain. The question was about the old rotary motion hand brakes, where one lifted the lever, then swung it from side to side, using the pawl and ratchet to hold tension while the handle was reset for another pull. Not the same thing at all. One of the original photos asked about appeared to be the Blackall style used on the USRA "government" cars. The other, with the enclosed handle on the lever, appears to be a Miner product. As far as I know neither is currently made, although Accurail had the Blackall style in their USRA hopper set years ago.

Dennis Storzek


Bruce Griffin
 

Group,

i think the closest to this prototype is actually the Accurail USRA 55 ton hopper brake lever part. Most of the other parts suggested use a chain at the mechanism and a bell crank at the sill while offering mechanical advantage. The lever in the photo is used to turn the brake staff and the chain tightens on the bottom of the shaft.  It looks like the lever handle folds up to horizontal to turn the shaft and the ratchet above the end sill allows the handle to to swing back when it fouls with the end boards. Thank you for the insights. 

Best Regards,
Bruce Griffin
Ashland, MD


Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 12:33 PM, Bruce Griffin wrote:
i think the closest to this prototype is actually the Accurail USRA 55 ton hopper brake lever part.
Here is the Blackall part as used on the USRA cars, lower left:



At the bottom of the staff it has a standard ratchet and pawl. The phantom view shows  the internal ratchet mechanism; raising the lever engages the teeth so the handle can turn the staff. Dropping the lever automatically raises the top casting, thereby disengaging the teeth so the lever doesn't fly around as the brakes release.

This was once a separate part in the Accurail USRA twin hopper kit, but only the upper casting and lever, the staff was molded to the car end sheet. The part was tiny and we had many complaints, so we eventually tooled it into the end sheet. For years the part was on the parts sprue, but it didn't always fill, and since it was no longer needed for the kit, this was no longer an issue. It doesn't show in the illustration of the USRA hopper parts sprue, but it may have been trimmed off so people don't think they are missing a part. It may actually still be on the parts sprue, but like I said, it may not be completely filled. 

It's a pretty simple part, not too bad to model from tubing and wire as someone else mentioned.

Dennis Storzek
Accurail, Inc.


WILLIAM PARDIE
 

A while back I was working on a NP stock car and I asked for help on the lever hand brake.  I received a number if good photos of this in addition to photos of a Wabash auto car with the Miner hand brake that I took ar the Monticello rail museum while at Naperville.  Both had the word Miner in raised letters on the lever.  Now I want that.  It is not that far fetched.  Look at the raised lettering on the Tahoe trucks.

Ah!  The farther we go the fa re the we go.

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
Date: 1/23/19 11:03 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling a Lever Hand Brake

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 12:33 PM, Bruce Griffin wrote:
i think the closest to this prototype is actually the Accurail USRA 55 ton hopper brake lever part.
Here is the Blackall part as used on the USRA cars, lower left:



At the bottom of the staff it has a standard ratchet and pawl. The phantom view shows  the internal ratchet mechanism; raising the lever engages the teeth so the handle can turn the staff. Dropping the lever automatically raises the top casting, thereby disengaging the teeth so the lever doesn't fly around as the brakes release.

This was once a separate part in the Accurail USRA twin hopper kit, but only the upper casting and lever, the staff was molded to the car end sheet. The part was tiny and we had many complaints, so we eventually tooled it into the end sheet. For years the part was on the parts sprue, but it didn't always fill, and since it was no longer needed for the kit, this was no longer an issue. It doesn't show in the illustration of the USRA hopper parts sprue, but it may have been trimmed off so people don't think they are missing a part. It may actually still be on the parts sprue, but like I said, it may not be completely filled. 

It's a pretty simple part, not too bad to model from tubing and wire as someone else mentioned.

Dennis Storzek
Accurail, Inc.


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Dennis, didn’t mean that the Moloco parts fulfilled the desire of the original post, someone wrote a description that fit these parts, I had a runner with most of the parts on the table in front of me, and confirmed that the Moloco parts were what was being described.  And added an opinion.  Incidentally, the reason they were on the table is that I used one of those parts on a car built in the ‘40s.

 

Schuyler

 

From: Dennis Storzek

 

On Tue, Jan 22, 2019 at 06:58 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

Moloco.  Nice parts. 


Where? This is all I see

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1032/8967/products/file_15_1024x1024.jpeg?v=1445453443

The only "lever" I see is a modern Minor pump style lever gear. Am I missing something?

The modern lever brakes have are high power brakes where one pumps the lever up and down to wind in the chain. The question was about the old rotary motion hand brakes, where one lifted the lever, then swung it from side to side, using the pawl and ratchet to hold tension while the handle was reset for another pull. Not the same thing at all. One of the original photos asked about appeared to be the Blackall style used on the USRA "government" cars. The other, with the enclosed handle on the lever, appears to be a Miner product. As far as I know neither is currently made, although Accurail had the Blackall style in their USRA hopper set years ago.

Dennis Storzek


Bruce Griffin
 

Group,

i originally posted the photos and these 500  gondolas were constructed in 1914 for the BR&P and transferred to the B& O in 1932. They stayed in revenue service when the last two were taken off the roster in 1954.  300 went to company service between 1948 and 1953. Bob Chapman wrote a modeling article for the B&O Modeler, https://borhs.org/modelermag/Modeler-42-201611.pdf The Sentinel, published by the BORRHS, has an article on the cars with multiple photos. 

Kits with all parts and decals were offered by the BORRHS in limited quantities but the basic kit is still available from Chad Boas and Mask Island produces decals for the various eras. It is a simple kit and well done with laser cut wood sides and ends.

Lucky for for me I have three B&O decorated Accurail USRA hoppers left unconstructed from a six pack produced many years ago and I have the needed parts.  Of the three I built I only used one casting as I built the other two with alternate brake parts that appeared in 40s and 50s era photos. I will try drilling out the center of the part and adding a brake staff down through to the ratchet that is cast into the end sill. In Bob’s article he used a brake wheel which I will probably do on one to reflect the photos available from the 40s and 50s. I will post photos here and on my blog when completed.  

Thank you all for the information and conversation.

Best Regards,
Bruce Griffin
Ashland, MD


Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 02:11 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
A while back I was working on a NP stock car and I asked for help on the lever hand brake.  I received a number if good photos of this in addition to photos of a Wabash auto car with the Miner hand brake that I took ar the Monticello rail museum while at Naperville.  Both had the word Miner in raised letters on the lever.  Now I want that.  It is not that far fetched.  Look at the raised lettering on the Tahoe trucks.
 
Ah!  The farther we go the fa re the we go.

You mean like this:


Apparently Precision Scale Co. made this part, but no lettering:

https://www.tmrdistributing.com/presta/index.php?id_product=8156&controller=product

Dennis Storzek
 


WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Dennis and others:

There are apparently several varieties of the Minerlever handbrake.  Dennis's photo is one. I have the Precision Scale casting but it did not quite meet my need.  The Overland model of the Wabash auto car has a casting.  I will try to get a photo of it and see if I know how to post it.

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
Date: 1/23/19 5:51 PM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling a Lever Hand Brake

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 02:11 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
A while back I was working on a NP stock car and I asked for help on the lever hand brake.  I received a number if good photos of this in addition to photos of a Wabash auto car with the Miner hand brake that I took ar the Monticello rail museum while at Naperville.  Both had the word Miner in raised letters on the lever.  Now I want that.  It is not that far fetched.  Look at the raised lettering on the Tahoe trucks.
 
Ah!  The farther we go the fa re the we go.

You mean like this:


Apparently Precision Scale Co. made this part, but no lettering:

https://www.tmrdistributing.com/presta/index.php?id_product=8156&controller=product

Dennis Storzek
 


Dave Parker
 

There is a 1921 Miner catalog available as a free e-book from Google books:

https://books.google.com/books?id=Wx4xAQAAMAAJ

It shows five styles of lever hand brakes.  Personally, I don't think the PSC #3567 part is an exact match to any of them, but it is certainly Miner-like.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Gene Green <genegreen1942@...>
 

At the risk of seeming dogmatic (again), while the hand brakes on the USRA hoppers might be referred to as "Blackall style," they were, in fact, The Perfection ratchet hand brake manufactured by Railway Devices Company.
Lever is the term correctly applied to the modern power hand brakes operated by a lever instead of a wheel..
Ratchet is the term for those "Blackall style" hand brakes which required the operator to lift the handle to horizontal and operate it as Dennis described.  Ratchet hand brakes can still be found on some relatively recent Amtrak passenger cars.
Gene Green


Dave Parker
 

Gene:

FWIW, the tabulation of drawings for the USRA standard cars (Railway Rev., Feb 15, 1919, vol 64, p. 259) shows the 55-t hoppers as receiving the Blackall ratchet, while the 50-t composite gondolas received the Perfection ratchet.

My photos of the composite gons are more limited than those of the hoppers, but I would say they tend to agree.  YMMV of course.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 09:07 PM, Dave Parker wrote:
There is a 1921 Miner catalog available as a free e-book from Google books:

https://books.google.com/books?id=Wx4xAQAAMAAJ

It shows five styles of lever hand brakes.  Personally, I don't think the PSC #3567 part is an exact match to any of them, but it is certainly Miner-like.
Cool. Dimensioned drawings, no less. The two versions of the Ideal Safety hand brake applicable to freightcars seem to differ only in having a round post on the bracket above the lever pivot. I suspect the purpose of this post is strictly to provide a convenient handhold for the brakeman's left hand.

I note that unlike the Blackall style I described earlier, there is no foot operated pawl and ratchet at platform lever; with the Miner Ideal Safety hand brake the ratchet must lock internally as the brakeman swings the handle back for another pull. The ratchet housing has a prominent release lever, similar to later high power hand brakes.

I agree the PSC part doesn't quite capture any of the actual Miner hand brakes. Much of the PSC product like is from pattern work done well nigh sixty years ago. CNC milling and Electro Discharge Machining were still in the future, and patterns were made with a file and lots of ingenuity.

The problem persists when the modeler is forced to 'roll his own' from bits of wire. Some key elements are just difficult to capture in such a small part. These would include the barrel shaped hand grip on forged handle of the Blackall gear, and the tapered lever with the ball at the end of the Miner gear. Hopefully 3D printing will someday get to the point where all these variations are easily possible. The data is certainly now easily available.

Dennis Storzek