Topics

Alexander scale models

ken chapin
 

Anyone know what happened to them, they sold a lot of detail parts. Ken
--
Sent from my Android phone with GMX Mail. Please excuse my brevity.

On 1/23/19, 11:16 AM Jon Miller <atsfus@...> wrote:
On 1/23/2019 9:08 AM, Pierre Oliver wrote:
The engine house kit was a ripoff of FSM John Allen's engine house, btw.

You can get FSM instructions at https://www.hoseeker.com/

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

Larry Smith
 

They still do go to Tomar and look it up.

Larry Smith

On Wednesday, January 23, 2019, 11:35:44 AM CST, ken chapin <alcobackshop@...> wrote:


Anyone know what happened to them, they sold a lot of detail parts. Ken
--
Sent from my Android phone with GMX Mail. Please excuse my brevity.
On 1/23/19, 11:16 AM Jon Miller <atsfus@...> wrote:
On 1/23/2019 9:08 AM, Pierre Oliver wrote:
The engine house kit was a ripoff of FSM John Allen's engine house, btw.

You can get FSM instructions at https://www.hoseeker.com/

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

Louis Van Winkle
 

Alexander was sold to Tomar Industries of Benton Harbor, MI
I used to do the metal casting at Alexander back in the 1970's.
Sure made a lot of doors and windows !!

Lou Van Winkle

Jon Miller
 

On 1/23/2019 10:00 AM, Louis Van Winkle wrote:
Alexander was sold to Tomar Industries of Benton Harbor, MI

    Just looked up and Tomar has been sold also.  Apparently Alexander casting have not been available as the notice seems to indicate that the new owners want to start doing the Alexander castings again.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

ron christensen
 

Look at Alexander Scale Models.
 Tomar has been sold to a west coast company
Alexander has the haunted house, school house and soon the B&O tower on sales
 In the Stewart line there are many castings in N and HO
attached are some of the first models he has made.

Alexander Scale Models will soon come out with the old Stewart 1/87 diacast Euclid scraper.

This appears to be the early 1950 model S7 Euclid scraper. 
Ron Christensen

Donald B. Valentine
 

    Could be off a year or two but that looks like a early 1960's Euclid scraper and this a bit late for
many of us. Nice model but when did Euclid introduce this prototype? Cartier-McNamara, the large 
Canadian was using general contractor, this type on I-89 construction in Bolton, Vt in 1963.

Cordially, Don Valentine

ron christensen
 

I found this one the internet
"One of the first pieces of equipment I noticed was this 1954 Euclid S7 scraper. Powered by a 4-71 Detroit Diesel attached to a 5 speed manual Clark transmission this green machine has a 7 yard capacity."
Also there was a note that a person found a maintenance manuals for S7 dated 1958
So I believe it is at least 1954 maybe earlier.
Ron Christensen

Kent Hurley <nvrr49@...>
 

Kent Hurley <nvrr49@...>
 

I did a lot of research on the Stewart Euclid scraper.  It is a 1940's era.  By the mid-50's they started getting larger then the model.

Kent Hurley

Bill Welch
 

So it appears there are two distinct scrapper models available: http://donmillsmodels.com/product/euclid-70fdt-89w-bottom-dump/

Bill Welch

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

The Don MIlls resin model is not a scraper … it’s a 1940’s-50’s Euclid bottom-dump off road truck. It’s a nice model.

The Stewart soft-metal model is a 1950’s-60’s vintage scraper. These machines were somewhat “streamlined”, and look more modern than they are. It’s a rather cude model, but reasonably accurate. 

Such machines often lasted a long time, so the two machines overlap in vintage. They operated up into the 1970’s at least. Some restored examples can still be seen today at HCEA shows and similar.

The only other such HO models are the plastic Caterpillar scrapers made by Roco-MiniMovers which are quite nice. These are larger and more recent machines, though still “vintage” by modern standards. There were two versions, each with the same scraper bowl, one with a 2-wheeled tractor, and one with a four-wheel tractor.

Nowadays there are also some diecast metal models of far more modern scrapers, some with twin engines.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Jan 28, 2019, at 6:59 AM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

So it appears there are two distinct scrapper models available: http://donmillsmodels.com/product/euclid-70fdt-89w-bottom-dump/

Bill Welch

Bruce Smith
 

Now, if anyone wants to offer a 1940’s era LeTourneau towed scraper for me to load on a flat car, that would make me very happy! (Photo is from the Signal Corps Archive, Library of Va)

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Jan 28, 2019, at 8:56 AM, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:

The Don MIlls resin model is not a scraper … it’s a 1940’s-50’s Euclid bottom-dump off road truck. It’s a nice model.

The Stewart soft-metal model is a 1950’s-60’s vintage scraper. These machines were somewhat “streamlined”, and look more modern than they are. It’s a rather cude model, but reasonably accurate. 

Such machines often lasted a long time, so the two machines overlap in vintage. They operated up into the 1970’s at least. Some restored examples can still be seen today at HCEA shows and similar.

The only other such HO models are the plastic Caterpillar scrapers made by Roco-MiniMovers which are quite nice. These are larger and more recent machines, though still “vintage” by modern standards. There were two versions, each with the same scraper bowl, one with a 2-wheeled tractor, and one with a four-wheel tractor.

Nowadays there are also some diecast metal models of far more modern scrapers, some with twin engines.

Dan Mitchell
==========
On Jan 28, 2019, at 6:59 AM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

So it appears there are two distinct scrapper models available: http://donmillsmodels.com/product/euclid-70fdt-89w-bottom-dump/

Bill Welch


Daniel A. Mitchell
 

YES! … That was the most common scraper of the WWII period, and many lasted far beyond that. It’s distinctive, so there are no substitutes, and it’s a rather complicated-looking machine that adds interest as a model. The LeTourneau scrapers came in several sizes, but most looked pretty much the same. Nearly all were pulled by crawler tractors of any make and appropriate size.

There were also the self-propelled Tournapull Super-C machines with a two-wheeled rubber-tired tractor. The bowl of the Tournapull was almost the same as on the towed scrapers.

Models of all these are available in 1/48 scale, but none in HO.

WAY back (1950’s? RMC?) there was a very brief article in one of the model railroad magazines on how to scratch built an HO version. Despite it’s complexity it wouldn’t be too difficult to scratchbuild one … most everything is either a rectangular beam or a flat plate. The tires could be scrounged from some other HO earthmover.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Jan 28, 2019, at 11:29 AM, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

Now, if anyone wants to offer a 1940’s era LeTourneau towed scraper for me to load on a flat car, that would make me very happy! (Photo is from the Signal Corps Archive, Library of Va)
Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith            
Auburn, AL
"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

<LeTourneau.jpg>


On Jan 28, 2019, at 8:56 AM, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:

The Don MIlls resin model is not a scraper … it’s a 1940’s-50’s Euclid bottom-dump off road truck. It’s a nice model.

The Stewart soft-metal model is a 1950’s-60’s vintage scraper. These machines were somewhat “streamlined”, and look more modern than they are. It’s a rather cude model, but reasonably accurate. 

Such machines often lasted a long time, so the two machines overlap in vintage. They operated up into the 1970’s at least. Some restored examples can still be seen today at HCEA shows and similar.

The only other such HO models are the plastic Caterpillar scrapers made by Roco-MiniMovers which are quite nice. These are larger and more recent machines, though still “vintage” by modern standards. There were two versions, each with the same scraper bowl, one with a 2-wheeled tractor, and one with a four-wheel tractor.

Nowadays there are also some diecast metal models of far more modern scrapers, some with twin engines.

Dan Mitchell
==========
On Jan 28, 2019, at 6:59 AM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

So it appears there are two distinct scrapper models available: http://donmillsmodels.com/product/euclid-70fdt-89w-bottom-dump/

Bill Welch



ford.donald77 <ford.donald77@...>
 

Group
i have two sets of Mercury Euclid TS-24 double engine scrapers that came with a blade mounted crawler tractor and a rubber tired front end loader.  I think they were promotional gifts of Euclid.  I got them when I worked a Blum's Hobby House in downtown Cleveland Ohio in 1960 or 61.  I think they are a little small for HO scale.  in 1958 I was driving truck and we would haul tires for Euclid from Goodyear on the west side of Cleveland to the Euclid plant trapped even on bright sunny day. Keen Driveaway would haul these on drop deck low-boys with just one set of tire on trailer and one set on the ground, terrible ride.
My computer skills don't allow me to photograph and post here.

Don Ford 
PRRT&HS 4255
Cameron Missouri

On Monday, January 28, 2019, 11:17:23 AM CST, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:


YES! … That was the most common scraper of the WWII period, and many lasted far beyond that. It’s distinctive, so there are no substitutes, and it’s a rather complicated-looking machine that adds interest as a model. The LeTourneau scrapers came in several sizes, but most looked pretty much the same. Nearly all were pulled by crawler tractors of any make and appropriate size.

There were also the self-propelled Tournapull Super-C machines with a two-wheeled rubber-tired tractor. The bowl of the Tournapull was almost the same as on the towed scrapers.

Models of all these are available in 1/48 scale, but none in HO.

WAY back (1950’s? RMC?) there was a very brief article in one of the model railroad magazines on how to scratch built an HO version. Despite it’s complexity it wouldn’t be too difficult to scratchbuild one … most everything is either a rectangular beam or a flat plate. The tires could be scrounged from some other HO earthmover.

Dan Mitchell
==========
On Jan 28, 2019, at 11:29 AM, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

Now, if anyone wants to offer a 1940’s era LeTourneau towed scraper for me to load on a flat car, that would make me very happy! (Photo is from the Signal Corps Archive, Library of Va)
Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith            
Auburn, AL
"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

<LeTourneau.jpg>


On Jan 28, 2019, at 8:56 AM, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:

The Don MIlls resin model is not a scraper … it’s a 1940’s-50’s Euclid bottom-dump off road truck. It’s a nice model.

The Stewart soft-metal model is a 1950’s-60’s vintage scraper. These machines were somewhat “streamlined”, and look more modern than they are. It’s a rather cude model, but reasonably accurate. 

Such machines often lasted a long time, so the two machines overlap in vintage. They operated up into the 1970’s at least. Some restored examples can still be seen today at HCEA shows and similar.

The only other such HO models are the plastic Caterpillar scrapers made by Roco-MiniMovers which are quite nice. These are larger and more recent machines, though still “vintage” by modern standards. There were two versions, each with the same scraper bowl, one with a 2-wheeled tractor, and one with a four-wheel tractor.

Nowadays there are also some diecast metal models of far more modern scrapers, some with twin engines.

Dan Mitchell
==========
On Jan 28, 2019, at 6:59 AM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

So it appears there are two distinct scrapper models available: http://donmillsmodels.com/product/euclid-70fdt-89w-bottom-dump/

Bill Welch



Eric Bergh
 

The article in question was in the May 1955 Model Railroader, by L. M. Opie.
Hope this helps,
-Eric

Rick Jesionowski
 

We are still using them in the 1990’s to move gravel on the North Slope. We also rebuilt them in the mid 1980’s to a like new condition. We called them B70’s.

Rick Jesionowski

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

While the TS-24 scraper has the same styling as the earlier S-7, it is about 15 years more recent (1960’s), and much larger … not to mention it’s dual engines. Definitely too modern for this group.

The Stewart model is the earleir and smaller S-7, dating from the early 1950’s. It can marginally be considered “steam era”.

The LeTourneau models also mentioned, both tractor-pulled and the rubber-tired Tournapull are definitely “steam era”.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Jan 28, 2019, at 1:02 PM, ford.donald77 via Groups.Io <ford.donald77@...> wrote:

Group
i have two sets of Mercury Euclid TS-24 double engine scrapers that came with a blade mounted crawler tractor and a rubber tired front end loader.  I think they were promotional gifts of Euclid.  I got them when I worked a Blum's Hobby House in downtown Cleveland Ohio in 1960 or 61.  I think they are a little small for HO scale.  in 1958 I was driving truck and we would haul tires for Euclid from Goodyear on the west side of Cleveland to the Euclid plant trapped even on bright sunny day. Keen Driveaway would haul these on drop deck low-boys with just one set of tire on trailer and one set on the ground, terrible ride.
My computer skills don't allow me to photograph and post here.

Don Ford 
PRRT&HS 4255
Cameron Missouri
On Monday, January 28, 2019, 11:17:23 AM CST, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:


YES! … That was the most common scraper of the WWII period, and many lasted far beyond that. It’s distinctive, so there are no substitutes, and it’s a rather complicated-looking machine that adds interest as a model. The LeTourneau scrapers came in several sizes, but most looked pretty much the same. Nearly all were pulled by crawler tractors of any make and appropriate size.

There were also the self-propelled Tournapull Super-C machines with a two-wheeled rubber-tired tractor. The bowl of the Tournapull was almost the same as on the towed scrapers.

Models of all these are available in 1/48 scale, but none in HO.

WAY back (1950’s? RMC?) there was a very brief article in one of the model railroad magazines on how to scratch built an HO version. Despite it’s complexity it wouldn’t be too difficult to scratchbuild one … most everything is either a rectangular beam or a flat plate. The tires could be scrounged from some other HO earthmover.

Dan Mitchell
==========
On Jan 28, 2019, at 11:29 AM, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

Now, if anyone wants to offer a 1940’s era LeTourneau towed scraper for me to load on a flat car, that would make me very happy! (Photo is from the Signal Corps Archive, Library of Va)
Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith            
Auburn, AL
"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

<LeTourneau.jpg>


On Jan 28, 2019, at 8:56 AM, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:

The Don MIlls resin model is not a scraper … it’s a 1940’s-50’s Euclid bottom-dump off road truck. It’s a nice model.

The Stewart soft-metal model is a 1950’s-60’s vintage scraper. These machines were somewhat “streamlined”, and look more modern than they are. It’s a rather cude model, but reasonably accurate. 

Such machines often lasted a long time, so the two machines overlap in vintage. They operated up into the 1970’s at least. Some restored examples can still be seen today at HCEA shows and similar.

The only other such HO models are the plastic Caterpillar scrapers made by Roco-MiniMovers which are quite nice. These are larger and more recent machines, though still “vintage” by modern standards. There were two versions, each with the same scraper bowl, one with a 2-wheeled tractor, and one with a four-wheel tractor.

Nowadays there are also some diecast metal models of far more modern scrapers, some with twin engines.

Dan Mitchell
==========
On Jan 28, 2019, at 6:59 AM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

So it appears there are two distinct scrapper models available: http://donmillsmodels.com/product/euclid-70fdt-89w-bottom-dump/

Bill Welch




Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Yes, Thanks, that’s it for sure. And, does it not make a great flatcar load?

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Jan 28, 2019, at 2:28 PM, Eric Bergh <ericbergh2@...> wrote:

The article in question was in the May 1955 Model Railroader, by L. M. Opie.
Hope this helps,
-Eric
<MR 5_55 LeTourneau Scraper flatcar load.png>

Schuyler Larrabee
 

So, Bruce, you’ll have one of these done and on a PRR flat for Cocoa Beach next January?   8:^)

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Bergh
Sent: Monday, January 28, 2019 2:28 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Alexander scale models

 

The article in question was in the May 1955 Model Railroader, by L. M. Opie
Hope this helps,
-Eric

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Bruce, Schuyler, and List Members,
 
In today's world, this looks to be an ideal item to be 3-D printed.
 
Not that I am volunteering, mind you!
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, January 28, 2019 10:41 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Alexander scale models

So, Bruce, you’ll have one of these done and on a PRR flat for Cocoa Beach next January?   8:^)

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Bergh
Sent: Monday, January 28, 2019 2:28 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Alexander scale models

 

The article in question was in the May 1955 Model Railroader, by L. M. Opie
Hope this helps,
-Eric