Topics

Gondola Load


Bruce Griffin
 

Friends,

Attached is a photo of a freight car load on a B&O train I model. It is on a local between Baltimore and western Maryland around 1950. Anyone have an idea what this could be?  It for sure looks to be an interesting load for a pair of gons.  Any insights appreciated.  

i will try to post a higher resolution scan tomorrow. Thank you for your input. 

Best Regards,
Bruce Griffin
Ashland, MD

https://bomodeling.com/blog/


Scott H. Haycock
 

Bruce,


My guess would be large scale industrial plumbing, or possibly waste treatment, or a dam. The large crates probably contain parts needed to fit the conduits's into their final location. The conduit seems to be at least 6 feet in diameter.


Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent

On January 30, 2019 at 1:32 AM Bruce Griffin <bdg1210@...> wrote:

Friends,

Attached is a photo of a freight car load on a B&O train I model. It is on a local between Baltimore and western Maryland around 1950. Anyone have an idea what this could be?  It for sure looks to be an interesting load for a pair of gons.  Any insights appreciated.  

i will try to post a higher resolution scan tomorrow. Thank you for your input. 

Best Regards,
Bruce Griffin
Ashland, MD

https://bomodeling.com/blog/


Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Obviously they’re large tubes of some kind … I’d suggest either for a steel mill or some hydro-electric or water supply purpose. The good question is what’s inside the wooden crate portion of the load? It seems to support the upper end of the tube, but there’s more going on inside the crate. Nice find.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Jan 30, 2019, at 3:32 AM, Bruce Griffin <bdg1210@...> wrote:

Friends,

Attached is a photo of a freight car load on a B&O train I model. It is on a local between Baltimore and western Maryland around 1950. Anyone have an idea what this could be?  It for sure looks to be an interesting load for a pair of gons.  Any insights appreciated.  

i will try to post a higher resolution scan tomorrow. Thank you for your input. 

Best Regards,
Bruce Griffin
Ashland, MD

https://bomodeling.com/blog/ <DD7C253F_AACB_44B6_B441_76932E91FB11.jpeg>


Douglas Harding
 

I was thinking water discharge pipe for a hydro dam. Or could be a mine or tunnel ventilation pipe. The wood crate looks to be a support and protection device for the elevated end. Notice the bracing inside the box.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Scott H. Haycock
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 2:45 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Gondola Load

 

Bruce,

 

My guess would be large scale industrial plumbing, or possibly waste treatment, or a dam. The large crates probably contain parts needed to fit the conduits's into their final location. The conduit seems to be at least 6 feet in diameter.

 

Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantment

On January 30, 2019 at 1:32 AM Bruce Griffin <bdg1210@...> wrote:

Friends,

Attached is a photo of a freight car load on a B&O train I model. It is on a local between Baltimore and western Maryland around 1950. Anyone have an idea what this could be?  It for sure looks to be an interesting load for a pair of gons.  Any insights appreciated.  

i will try to post a higher resolution scan tomorrow. Thank you for your input. 

Best Regards,
Bruce Griffin
Ashland, MD

https://bomodeling.com/blog/


Bruce Griffin
 

Group,

John King offered a much higher resolution scan for consideration. The load and gon are much clearer than in the scan I shared at first. The load is headed west from Baltimore in 1952 about 14 miles west of Baltimore. Any additional thoughts on origin or contents?  

Best Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD


Tony Thompson
 

The WP box car on the siding is interesting.
Tony Thompson 


On Mar 31, 2019, at 6:50 PM, Bruce Griffin <bdg1210@...> wrote:

Group,

John King offered a much higher resolution scan for consideration. The load and gon are much clearer than in the scan I shared at first. The load is headed west from Baltimore in 1952 about 14 miles west of Baltimore. Any additional thoughts on origin or contents?  

Best Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD

<King Sentinel Photos OML2.jpg>


Tim O'Connor
 


looks like industrial-size duct work... for moving air. lots of it.

WP 20243 is a 9-6 IH version of a 1937 AAR box car (normally 10-0 IH)

Anyone ever make resin kits for the "low height" 1937 box cars of the WP and ATSF (Bx-26)?

Tim O'Connor



On 3/31/2019 9:50 PM, Bruce Griffin wrote:

Group,

John King offered a much higher resolution scan for consideration. The load and gon are much clearer than in the scan I shared at first. The load is headed west from Baltimore in 1952 about 14 miles west of Baltimore. Any additional thoughts on origin or contents?  

Best Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD

Attachments:

_._,

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Brent Greer
 

Looks more like a component for an electricity generating water turbine system for a dam somewhere

Brent

________________________________
Dr. J. Brent Greer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2019 11:28:41 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Gondola Load
 

looks like industrial-size duct work... for moving air. lots of it.

WP 20243 is a 9-6 IH version of a 1937 AAR box car (normally 10-0 IH)

Anyone ever make resin kits for the "low height" 1937 box cars of the WP and ATSF (Bx-26)?

Tim O'Connor



On 3/31/2019 9:50 PM, Bruce Griffin wrote:

Group,

John King offered a much higher resolution scan for consideration. The load and gon are much clearer than in the scan I shared at first. The load is headed west from Baltimore in 1952 about 14 miles west of Baltimore. Any additional thoughts on origin or contents?  

Best Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD

Attachments:

_._,

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Tim,
 
Given the size, I suspect a sluiceway or penstock for a dam is more likely.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Tim O'Connor
Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2019 11:28 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Gondola Load
 

looks like industrial-size duct work... for moving air. lots of it.

WP 20243 is a 9-6 IH version of a 1937 AAR box car (normally 10-0 IH)

Anyone ever make resin kits for the "low height" 1937 box cars of the WP and ATSF (Bx-26)?

Tim O'Connor



On 3/31/2019 9:50 PM, Bruce Griffin wrote:

Group,

John King offered a much higher resolution scan for consideration. The load and gon are much clearer than in the scan I shared at first. The load is headed west from Baltimore in 1952 about 14 miles west of Baltimore. Any additional thoughts on origin or contents? 

Best Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD

Attachments:

_._,

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Fred Jansz
 

Tim and others interested,
WP 20243 also caught my eye immediately of course.
A Western Pacific car on the B&O!
Who would have thaught that.
However 20243 is not from the 20001-20200 'shorty' 9'6" batch (issued by Speedwitch (K-114, white or silver lettering), I own 3 of these kits, all built now), but from the  1945-built Mt Vernon batch WP 20201-20550 which has the 10'6" IH.
regards, Fred Jansz


Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

Very interesting indeed. It is a Mt. Vernon 40', 10'6" IH AAR boxcar with 6' doors, part of series 20201-20550 built in 1945. It would have been painted FCR with "white" lettering (called "aluminum because of its pigment, but appearing white) and the square "Feather River Route" herald in black-and-white.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 3/31/19 10:18 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
The WP box car on the siding is interesting.
Tony Thompson 


On Mar 31, 2019, at 6:50 PM, Bruce Griffin <bdg1210@...> wrote:

Group,

John King offered a much higher resolution scan for consideration. The load and gon are much clearer than in the scan I shared at first. The load is headed west from Baltimore in 1952 about 14 miles west of Baltimore. Any additional thoughts on origin or contents?  

Best Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD

<King Sentinel Photos OML2.jpg>


Paul Woods <paul@...>
 

As an engineer who has built all kinds of pipework for handling water, and all kinds of ductwork for handling air, I would lean towards the gon loads being the latter.  The bracing seems too light for water piping.  The large boxy structures remind me of acoustic enclosures I designed for ships, to prevent the unholy roar of ventilation fans from reverberating along the sheet-metal ducting.

Regards
Paul Woods

Whangarei, NZ


RICH CHAPIN
 

Has look of a large air-handling system. Structure doesn't look heavy enough [i.e, the cross-sections of the sheet metal] to handle water. Nice shot, love gon loads, Thx

Rich Chapin
Basking Ridge, NJ


Dennis Storzek
 

Related to air handling, could also be a plenum to conduct flue gasses from a furnace to a smoke stack.
Dennis Storzek


Bruce Smith
 

Bruce,

Thanks for the more high res view, but it doesn’t really appear to change anything from our January discussion. It appears to either be a penstock, or some similar water piping or part of some sort of ventilation system. Looking at the boxy parts on the end, they have some irregularities that make me think that they might be temporary protection for something as opposed to a permanent part of whatever this is.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Mar 31, 2019, at 8:50 PM, Bruce Griffin <bdg1210@...> wrote:

Group,

John King offered a much higher resolution scan for consideration. The load and gon are much clearer than in the scan I shared at first. The load is headed west from Baltimore in 1952 about 14 miles west of Baltimore. Any additional thoughts on origin or contents?  

Best Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD

<King Sentinel Photos OML2.jpg>


Bruce Smith
 

Fred,

Why?  A WP car on the B&O comes as no surprise at all to me. We’ve documented repeatedly on this list that boxcars traveled the entire country.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Apr 1, 2019, at 1:06 AM, Fred Jansz <fred@...> wrote:

Tim and others interested,
WP 20243 also caught my eye immediately of course.
A Western Pacific car on the B&O!
Who would have thaught that.
However 20243 is not from the 20001-20200 'shorty' 9'6" batch (issued by Speedwitch (K-114, white or silver lettering), I own 3 of these kits, all built now), but from the  1945-built Mt Vernon batch WP 20201-20550 which has the 10'6" IH.
regards, Fred Jansz


Andy Carlson
 

My first thought was of a bean separator, such as used for Lima Beans. Not at all uncommon in California. Not many photos, as these were buried inside structures. I have such a bean separator I made dozens of years ago for a San Luis Obispo building.

Of course, the device is what it is, and our consensus doesn't necessary prove anything.
-Andy Carlson

On Monday, April 1, 2019, 5:56:50 AM PDT, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:


Bruce,

Thanks for the more high res view, but it doesn’t really appear to change anything from our January discussion. It appears to either be a penstock, or some similar water piping or part of some sort of ventilation system. Looking at the boxy parts on the end, they have some irregularities that make me think that they might be temporary protection for something as opposed to a permanent part of whatever this is.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Mar 31, 2019, at 8:50 PM, Bruce Griffin <bdg1210@...> wrote:

Group,

John King offered a much higher resolution scan for consideration. The load and gon are much clearer than in the scan I shared at first. The load is headed west from Baltimore in 1952 about 14 miles west of Baltimore. Any additional thoughts on origin or contents?  

Best Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD

<King Sentinel Photos OML2.jpg>


Benjamin Hom
 

Fred Jansz wrote:
"A Western Pacific car on the B&O! Who would have [thought] that.

Bruce Smith wrote:
"Why?  A WP car on the B&O comes as no surprise at all to me. We’ve documented repeatedly on this list that boxcars traveled the entire country."

Because Boomer Pete lives on..."The evil that men do lives after them; the good is oft interred with their bones."  It's sad how bad information in this hobby keeps getting passed on over and over again.


Ben Hom


Bill Welch
 

Some of us have no idea who Boomer Pete is/was. Wondering if there is a way on the opening page of this group to have a yet to be authored and agreed upon "Ten Commandments of Freight Cars?"

Commandment 1)  XM Boxcars went everywhere

Bill Welch


Benjamin Hom
 

Bill Welch wrote:
"Some of us have no idea who Boomer Pete is/was."

Boomer Pete was a pen name that Al Kalmbach used to author various articles in Model Railroader.  The specific reference here is a piece written by him detailing the mix of home and foreign road freight cars.  He logically stated the mix should be a 50-50 mix of home road and foreign road cars, with foreign road cars weighed favoring proximity to the home road.  This idea gained unwarranted legitimacy as it was repeated in of John Armstrong's "Track Planning for Realistic Operations" (still worth getting an early edition, as later editions dropped a lot of material, and both are superior to what Kalmbach is currently offering with regards to books on model railroad operation).

The problem is that depending on the type of freight cars, this isn't the case, especially with general service cars as plain boxcars and flat cars, which tend to average out to national fleet averages.  For extensive e-mails on the subject, do a search on the late Tim Gilbert's e-mails in the group archive.  Or for a nice summary, see Tony Thompson's blog entries on the subject.


Ben Hom