Canopy Cement


Brian Carlson
 

Several list members have extoled the vitures of canopy cement. I bought a bottle late last year at the local hobby shop. I’ve had abysmal luck with it so far using it to attach roofwalks to roofs. My application method has been to apply a tiny dollop to each roof saddle and the press the roofwalk down, and hold the roofwalk in place with light pressure while it dries.  Once dry the roofwalks then proceed to fall off the roof with the slightest touch. I also don’t like that the product dries very shiny but that is a minor annoyance.

 

The product I was sold was Testor’s Clear parts and window maker Amazon link to show the product. https://www.amazon.com/Testor-Model-Master-Cement-Window/dp/B0006NDZDU

 

So my question is the product the problem, or is it my application method?

 

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY

 


Paul Doggett
 

Brian 

I use Formula 560 canopy glue and have had excellent results with it. Try eBay for it.

Paul Doggett England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 6 Feb 2019, at 15:20, Brian Carlson via Groups.Io <prrk41361@...> wrote:

Several list members have extoled the vitures of canopy cement. I bought a bottle late last year at the local hobby shop. I’ve had abysmal luck with it so far using it to attach roofwalks to roofs. My application method has been to apply a tiny dollop to each roof saddle and the press the roofwalk down, and hold the roofwalk in place with light pressure while it dries.  Once dry the roofwalks then proceed to fall off the roof with the slightest touch. I also don’t like that the product dries very shiny but that is a minor annoyance.

 

The product I was sold was Testor’s Clear parts and window maker Amazon link to show the product. https://www.amazon.com/Testor-Model-Master-Cement-Window/dp/B0006NDZDU

 

So my question is the product the problem, or is it my application method?

 

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY

 


Benjamin Hom
 

Brian Carlson asked:
"So my question is the product the problem, or is it my application method?"

Not the same stuff.  The Testors product looks to be their version of Microscale Krystal Klear, which is more a version of white glue.  The stuff you want is manufactured by Pacer, Wilhold, or Zap.  More information from Tony's blog at


Ben Hom


Brian Carlson
 

Thanks Ben. I am familiar with Tony’s blog. I was afraid the hobby shop owner sold me a product that wasn’t actually what I was looking for, and it turns out that is the case.  I’ll have to look for some online.

 

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Wednesday, February 6, 2019 10:32 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Canopy Cement

 

Brian Carlson asked:

"So my question is the product the problem, or is it my application method?"

 

Not the same stuff.  The Testors product looks to be their version of Microscale Krystal Klear, which is more a version of white glue.  The stuff you want is manufactured by Pacer, Wilhold, or Zap.  More information from Tony's blog at

 

 

Ben Hom


Todd Sullivan
 

I have been using Barge cement in the blue tube, available from ACE hardware stores (may have to special order it, but it's in their catalog) using the same technique that you use, applied in sparing amounts with a round toothpick.  It's bullet-proof, and I have had no problems with roof running boards or other small parts coming off, even with dissimilar materials.  I also use it to tack parts in position before I apply CA, where getting them positioned and aligned is very tricky.

Todd Sullivan.


Jim Betz
 

Brian C.,

  If what you bought was "a Krystal Klear knock off" then it will probably still
work for the purpose you are trying to use it for ... I use KK as an adhesive
all the time and for jobs such as you describe what I would do is to run a
bead of KK across the ribs (not a dot) and do all the rest of what you did.
For it to be "dry" it has to sit, undisturbed with the weight on it, for at LEAST
4 hours and I'd probably leave it for 24 hours. Even with your using very
small amounts of it I would hazard a guess that you tested the bond too
soon.  The drying process for KK goes like this - first it "skins over" but
is still quite rubbery, then it will go clear thru the entire depth of the
product (as I said at least 4 and up to 24 hours) - if there is any haziness
to the product it is not dry and will easily let go. 
  I get why you used very small amounts of the 'glue' ... but for this 
particular use (roof walks) I don't think that was necessary. 

  Personally, I don't object to the 'shiny surface' when it is dry.  Because it
dries clear and so small amounts of "over glue" (using too much) usually
"disappear".  Additionally KK can be painted (or dull coated) and when
that is done any "over glue" will look like a welding seam - if you can find
it!

  One of the best characteristics of KK is that if you want to take the parts
apart you can let some water -sit- on it for at least 30 minutes and I usually
use 1-2 hours and it will soften enough to let go.  Further rinsing/flushing
will get all of the KK off - then dry the part fully and start over.

  I -always- use a round toothpick to apply KK.  You can pick up a small
amount by just dipping the tip into the surface of the KK or you can
shove it down it a half inch more to get a lot.

  KK forms a natural (read "unavoidable") fillet of material where ever two
surfaces being glued meet.  This characteristic is especially useful when
gluing items that don't fit perfectly and/or when more strength is wanted.
Examples are gluing the window shades to the cab roof of a Geep or
when installing grabs in holes that are a bit too big (for this one I dip the
point of the toothpick in the KK and then push it into the hole and twirl
it and finally put the grab into the hole.
  KK is especially useful when joining painted parts such as a detail
part that only has to stay where it is (i.e. does not need a lot of strength)
because once the KK has dried if you don't use water first you will
probably remove some of paint before it lets go - or break one of
the parts on the two sides of the joint.
                                                                                            - Jim B.

  


frograbbit602
 

Brian you have the wrong glue type.

The bottle, yes there is a 2nd one in the back, in the photo is what you want.

Lester Breuer


Charles Happel
 

Has anyone tried what Micro-Mark sells as watch crystal cement? From the description, It sounds similar to what you are describing, and is definitely not white glue.
Chuck Happel

Make crime pay. Become a lawyer. Will Rogers

--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 2/6/19, Todd Sullivan via Groups.Io <sullivant41=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Canopy Cement
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: Wednesday, February 6, 2019, 10:45 AM

I have been using Barge
cement in the blue tube, available from ACE hardware stores
(may have to special order it, but it's in their
catalog) using the same technique that you use, applied in
sparing amounts with a round toothpick.  It's
bullet-proof, and I have had no problems with roof running
boards or other small parts coming off, even with dissimilar
materials.  I also use it to tack parts in position before
I apply CA, where getting them positioned and aligned is
very tricky.

Todd Sullivan.


Pete C
 

I have used GS-Hypo cement which is what I think they are “duplicating”
It’s a crystal clear solvent cement and has a lot of uses in modeling. But it’s definitely not white glue as you said. I have used it for installing window glazing and works well.
The tiny tip makes it easy to put it where you need it.

Pete

On Feb 6, 2019, at 1:29 PM, Charles Happel via Groups.Io <cghappel2001=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Has anyone tried what Micro-Mark sells as watch crystal cement? From the description, It sounds similar to what you are describing, and is definitely not white glue.
Chuck Happel

Make crime pay. Become a lawyer. Will Rogers

--------------------------------------------
On Wed, 2/6/19, Todd Sullivan via Groups.Io <sullivant41=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Canopy Cement
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: Wednesday, February 6, 2019, 10:45 AM

I have been using Barge
cement in the blue tube, available from ACE hardware stores
(may have to special order it, but it's in their
catalog) using the same technique that you use, applied in
sparing amounts with a round toothpick. It's
bullet-proof, and I have had no problems with roof running
boards or other small parts coming off, even with dissimilar
materials. I also use it to tack parts in position before
I apply CA, where getting them positioned and aligned is
very tricky.

Todd Sullivan.






golden1014
 

Sorry you've had bad luck, Brian.  Formula 560 is the right stuff.  I use it on a whole lot of applications now and it almost always works great.  I get mine mail order and you should be able to as well.

John Golden


gtws00
 

My overall experience with Canopy Glue 560 has been very good. I like it to tack parts and follow up with a bit pf CA. I did however get either a old bottle or one that had froze in transit that never seemed to dry properly.
I now make sure that if ordered over the web that the temperatures are not below freezing (recent Polar Vortex) or way too hot. That goes for all my paints and glues. Not sure if that matters but I have not had any issues lately.  
George Toman