Topics

Journal bearing sizes


Charles Peck
 

Having already donated most of my old books to museums, I now need one.
What are the standard journal bearing sizes in the smaller ranges, under 5 inch diameter?
Yes, the sort that would be under freight cars behind behind steam locomotives before
most of us were born.
Chuck Peck


Ian Cranstone
 

From the January 1951 ORER...

Ian Cranstone
Osgoode, Ontario, Canada
lamontc@...

 


On 2019-02-19 17:33, Charles Peck wrote:

Having already donated most of my old books to museums, I now need one.
What are the standard journal bearing sizes in the smaller ranges, under 5 inch diameter?
Yes, the sort that would be under freight cars behind behind steam locomotives before
most of us were born.
Chuck Peck


Charles Peck
 

Thank you,
Chuck

On Tue, Feb 19, 2019 at 5:39 PM Ian Cranstone <lamontc@...> wrote:

From the January 1951 ORER...

Ian Cranstone
Osgoode, Ontario, Canada
lamontc@...

 


On 2019-02-19 17:33, Charles Peck wrote:

Having already donated most of my old books to museums, I now need one.
What are the standard journal bearing sizes in the smaller ranges, under 5 inch diameter?
Yes, the sort that would be under freight cars behind behind steam locomotives before
most of us were born.
Chuck Peck


earlyrail
 

There are specs for earlier/smaller axles.  If interested.let me know and I'll dig the information out
Howard Garner (modeling 1905)


Charles Peck
 

The older standards might be useful.  I'm looking at one truck marked D&RG  without the W so
it's pretty old.  I can measure the existing bearings but if they do not match any existing
or former standard, I see little point in looking for spares.
It just worries me to operate with zero spares on hand and some in use are already well worn. 
Chuck Peck

On Tue, Feb 19, 2019 at 6:13 PM earlyrail <cascaderail@...> wrote:
There are specs for earlier/smaller axles.  If interested.let me know and I'll dig the information out
Howard Garner (modeling 1905)


David Soderblom
 

I think you’re extremely unlikely to find smaller than 3-3/4 x 7 because that’s the size bearings West Side Lumber Co. used on narrow gauge log cars and other equipment (with some 4-1/4 x 8 on the larger cars). Even the smallest standard gauge rolling stock would have needed at least 3-3/4 x 7.

David Soderblom
Baltimore MD USA
drs@stsci.edu, 410-338-4543


Randy Hees
 

Is this narrow gauge?  If so, the D&RG was using a non-MCB collarless axle (called a "Muley") on their standard freight truck.  This bearing has a face to bear on the end of the axle to control thrust.

If standard gauge, the original MCB bearing was 3 3/4 x 7...   This became the MCB A bearing when the B size  (4 1/2x8) was adopted in the mid 1880's, followed by the C (5x9) in the 1890's...

MCB bearings A are very hard to find...  B's and C's are out there... 

Randy Hees


David Soderblom
 

Yes, West Side was 3-foot gauge. They had a few trucks that had started out on the Florence & Cripple Creek.

David Soderblom
Baltimore MD USA
drs@stsci.edu, 410-338-4543


Charles Peck
 

Yes, the trucks are 3 foot gauge.  No collar on the end of the axle and the wedge has a thrust
bearing plate on it.  And those little boxes have to be jacked up just right to get parts in
and out.  Not very forgiving.  
Chuck Peck

On Wed, Feb 20, 2019 at 1:04 PM Randy Hees <randyhees@...> wrote:
Is this narrow gauge?  If so, the D&RG was using a non-MCB collarless axle (called a "Muley") on their standard freight truck.  This bearing has a face to bear on the end of the axle to control thrust.

If standard gauge, the original MCB bearing was 3 3/4 x 7...   This became the MCB A bearing when the B size  (4 1/2x8) was adopted in the mid 1880's, followed by the C (5x9) in the 1890's...

MCB bearings A are very hard to find...  B's and C's are out there... 

Randy Hees