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Throwback Thursday: Ambroid Western Union Material Car


Benjamin Hom
 

Ambroid Western Union Material Car ad, October 1959 issue of Model Railroader.


Ben Hom


Peter Ness
 

Ben, Thank you for continuing to post these “blasts for the past”  This ad is actually from before my time (I was  4 and did not receive my Lionel train set from Santa until two months later in that year).

 

Questions to those who may know;

What made Ambroid “The Universal” Liquid cement?

Why on the green earth would one need a cement that is “hot fuel proof”?  Was that an attempt to say non-flammable?

 

In my early modeling years, including all types of models, I used plastic cement from Testors, Revell, or Pla. One time I ended up with a tube of Duco cement which I never could figure out how to use properly and at the time was convinced it was made for neither plastic nor wood adhesion.  In my early teens I discovered Goo, which remained my go-to alternate glue (after Testors and Elmers) for many years.  For a long time I also had a tin of rubber cement which is now back in vogue as a weathering/aging material of sorts.

 

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Thursday, March 28, 2019 6:31 AM
To: STMFC <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid Western Union Material Car

 

Ambroid Western Union Material Car ad, October 1959 issue of Model Railroader.





Ben Hom

 


Benjamin Hom
 

Peter Ness asked:
"Why on the green earth would one need a cement that is “hot fuel proof”?  Was that an attempt to say non-flammable?"

It's meant to market the glue to the flying model airplane community.

_._,_._,_


Charles Peck
 

For the "hot fuel proof" question, Ambroid was also marketed to model airplane builders. 
When fueling a powered model, it was certainly possible to spill some fuel.  It would be really  
disappointing to have the engine fall off because the fuel had dissolved the wood bonds where 
it was mounted.  
Chuck Peck

On Thu, Mar 28, 2019 at 9:02 AM Peter Ness <prness@...> wrote:

Ben, Thank you for continuing to post these “blasts for the past”  This ad is actually from before my time (I was  4 and did not receive my Lionel train set from Santa until two months later in that year).

 

Questions to those who may know;

What made Ambroid “The Universal” Liquid cement?

Why on the green earth would one need a cement that is “hot fuel proof”?  Was that an attempt to say non-flammable?

 

In my early modeling years, including all types of models, I used plastic cement from Testors, Revell, or Pla. One time I ended up with a tube of Duco cement which I never could figure out how to use properly and at the time was convinced it was made for neither plastic nor wood adhesion.  In my early teens I discovered Goo, which remained my go-to alternate glue (after Testors and Elmers) for many years.  For a long time I also had a tin of rubber cement which is now back in vogue as a weathering/aging material of sorts.

 

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Thursday, March 28, 2019 6:31 AM
To: STMFC <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid Western Union Material Car

 

Ambroid Western Union Material Car ad, October 1959 issue of Model Railroader.





Ben Hom

 


Daniel A. Mitchell
 

The exhaust of model aircraft engines, especially when poorly adjusted, sprayed hot unburned, and partially burned, fuel and fuel-residue all over the model. I’ve seen them get quite “gooey” as a result. This often destroyed the painted finish. If it soaked in, it could weaken glue joints.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Mar 28, 2019, at 9:28 AM, Charles Peck <lnnrr152@...> wrote:

For the "hot fuel proof" question, Ambroid was also marketed to model airplane builders. 
When fueling a powered model, it was certainly possible to spill some fuel.  It would be really  
disappointing to have the engine fall off because the fuel had dissolved the wood bonds where 
it was mounted.  
Chuck Peck

On Thu, Mar 28, 2019 at 9:02 AM Peter Ness <prness@...> wrote:

Ben, Thank you for continuing to post these “blasts for the past”  This ad is actually from before my time (I was  4 and did not receive my Lionel train set from Santa until two months later in that year).

 

Questions to those who may know;

What made Ambroid “The Universal” Liquid cement?

Why on the green earth would one need a cement that is “hot fuel proof”?  Was that an attempt to say non-flammable?

 

In my early modeling years, including all types of models, I used plastic cement from Testors, Revell, or Pla. One time I ended up with a tube of Duco cement which I never could figure out how to use properly and at the time was convinced it was made for neither plastic nor wood adhesion.  In my early teens I discovered Goo, which remained my go-to alternate glue (after Testors and Elmers) for many years.  For a long time I also had a tin of rubber cement which is now back in vogue as a weathering/aging material of sorts.

 

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Thursday, March 28, 2019 6:31 AM
To: STMFC <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid Western Union Material Car

 

Ambroid Western Union Material Car ad, October 1959 issue of Model Railroader.





Ben Hom

 





Peter Ness
 

Thanks to all who took the time to inform me about the intent of “hot fuel proof”. While I did build a couple balsa (or basswood…) aircraft models as a kid, they were rubber band powered. By the time I was “old enough” for motor powered aircraft, they were already made of plastic and metal. Sometimes I’m sorry to have missed some of the earlier technologies,,,,

 

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Thursday, March 28, 2019 9:20 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid Western Union Material Car

 

Peter Ness asked:

"Why on the green earth would one need a cement that is “hot fuel proof”?  Was that an attempt to say non-flammable?"

 

It's meant to market the glue to the flying model airplane community.


Benjamin Hom
 

The Southeastern Railway Museum in Decatur, GA is restoring a Western Union tool car.


Ben Hom



Donald B. Valentine
 

   Actually, Ben, the prototype for that Western Union car hung around on the B&M for some years in the Connecticut River Valley. Harry Frye and I first ran across it one 
Saturday in the early 1970's  at the west end of the former Greenfield, Mass. station site on a siding of the westbound Fitchburg Div. main. By the early 1980's it had been
moved to the East Deerfield Yard where it sat for some additional years. From there it disappeared but whether it was simply moved again to some unknown location or 
scrapped I cannot state. Sorting through a large box of older negatives and photos here in recent weeks I ran across a photo of it taken in Greenfield these many years ago.
I have always felt the Ambroid model was a fairly good rendition of this unusual piece of equipment. Perhaps I should find the photo again, scan it an post it here.

Cordially, Don Valentine


gary laakso
 

Ben, they even used the white wash technique to highlight the under body details for us!  

Gary Laakso
Northwest of Mike Brock


Tony Thompson
 

Ben Hom wrote:

Ambroid Western Union Material Car ad, October 1959 issue of Model Railroader.

     I picked up one of these models at a swap meet, repaired a few "ouches," and have used it in my layout op sessions. It led me to discover that Southern Pacific, which I model, had its own telephone/telegraph lines in most areas, but also made use of Western Union lines in some other areas, and that WU did maintain its own lines. Even when the WU lines were not being used by SP, they often were built parallel to the tracks, so WU maintenance equipment is not out of place. I would never have learned any of that if I had not chosen to buy this model.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Dennis Storzek
 

Interestingly, the Soo Line had one of these cars on their work equipment roster after WWII. Turns out the Chicago -Twin Cities telegraph line was owned by Western Union and the Soo rented a couple wires for company business. This made WU responcibilityfor the line maintenance and gang was assigned. When the Soo later bought the pole line, the assigned maintenance equipment was part of the transaction. I wouldn't doubt other roads had similar transactions.
Dennis Storzek


Benjamin Hom
 

Don Valentine wrote:
"...the prototype for that Western Union car hung around on the B&M for some years in the Connecticut River Valley. Harry Frye and I first ran across it one 
Saturday in the early 1970's  at the west end of the former Greenfield, Mass. station site on a siding of the westbound Fitchburg Div. main. By the early 1980's it had been moved to the East Deerfield Yard where it sat for some additional years. From there it disappeared but whether it was simply moved again to some unknown location or scrapped I cannot state. Sorting through a large box of older negatives and photos here in recent weeks I ran across a photo of it taken in Greenfield these many years ago. I have always felt the Ambroid model was a fairly good rendition of this unusual piece of equipment. Perhaps I should find the photo again, scan it an post it here."

WUTX 7559 at East Deerfield MA, November 17, 1973, Steve Brayton photo, posted on George Elwood's website:


Ben Hom


gary laakso
 

Thanks, Ben!  It has the bottom sill that another throwback, Train-Miniature featured on its plastic boxcars. 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mick Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Thursday, March 28, 2019 11:27 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid Western Union Material Car

 

Don Valentine wrote:

"...the prototype for that Western Union car hung around on the B&M for some years in the Connecticut River Valley. Harry Frye and I first ran across it one 

Saturday in the early 1970's  at the west end of the former Greenfield, Mass. station site on a siding of the westbound Fitchburg Div. main. By the early 1980's it had been moved to the East Deerfield Yard where it sat for some additional years. From there it disappeared but whether it was simply moved again to some unknown location or scrapped I cannot state. Sorting through a large box of older negatives and photos here in recent weeks I ran across a photo of it taken in Greenfield these many years ago. I have always felt the Ambroid model was a fairly good rendition of this unusual piece of equipment. Perhaps I should find the photo again, scan it an post it here."

 

WUTX 7559 at East Deerfield MA, November 17, 1973, Steve Brayton photo, posted on George Elwood's website:

 

 

Ben Hom


mofwcaboose
 

Indeed. The Soo, the Chicago & Northwestern, the Georgia, the Nickel Plate, and the Frisco all had ex-Western Union cars among their nonrevenue equipment. The Nickel Plate seems to have had the most.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Mar 28, 2019 2:19 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid Western Union Material Car

Interestingly, the Soo Line had one of these cars on their work equipment roster after WWII. Turns out the Chicago -Twin Cities telegraph line was owned by Western Union and the Soo rented a couple wires for company business. This made WU responcibilityfor the line maintenance and gang was assigned. When the Soo later bought the pole line, the assigned maintenance equipment was part of the transaction. I wouldn't doubt other roads had similar transactions.
Dennis Storzek


Frank Pearsall
 

Good evening:

I have a number of 1/4” drawings in my collection for:

Western Union Telegraph Co., Outfit Car No. 301 (32’)
Western Union Telegraph Co., Outfit Car No. 302 (32’)
Western Union Telegraph Co., Outfit Car No. 303 (32’)

Interesting they were so much shorter than the one being discussed.

Frank A. Pearsall
Brevard, N.C.

On Mar 28, 2019, at 2:27 PM, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:

Don Valentine wrote:
"...the prototype for that Western Union car hung around on the B&M for some years in the Connecticut River Valley. Harry Frye and I first ran across it one 
Saturday in the early 1970's  at the west end of the former Greenfield, Mass. station site on a siding of the westbound Fitchburg Div. main. By the early 1980's it had been moved to the East Deerfield Yard where it sat for some additional years. From there it disappeared but whether it was simply moved again to some unknown location or scrapped I cannot state. Sorting through a large box of older negatives and photos here in recent weeks I ran across a photo of it taken in Greenfield these many years ago. I have always felt the Ambroid model was a fairly good rendition of this unusual piece of equipment. Perhaps I should find the photo again, scan it an post it here."

WUTX 7559 at East Deerfield MA, November 17, 1973, Steve Brayton photo, posted on George Elwood's website:


Ben Hom
_._,_._,_



mofwcaboose
 

That is because they were narrow-gauge cars used on the narrow gauge parts of the Denver & Rio Grande Western in Colorado. Two of them still exist; what was once 301 is on the Cumbres & Toltec; the former 302 is at the Colorado Railroad Museum.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Frank Pearsall <plans@...>
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Mar 28, 2019 7:17 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid Western Union Material Car

Good evening:

I have a number of 1/4” drawings in my collection for:

Western Union Telegraph Co., Outfit Car No. 301 (32’)
Western Union Telegraph Co., Outfit Car No. 302 (32’)
Western Union Telegraph Co., Outfit Car No. 303 (32’)

Interesting they were so much shorter than the one being discussed.

Frank A. Pearsall
Brevard, N.C.

On Mar 28, 2019, at 2:27 PM, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:

Don Valentine wrote:
"...the prototype for that Western Union car hung around on the B&M for some years in the Connecticut River Valley. Harry Frye and I first ran across it one 
Saturday in the early 1970's  at the west end of the former Greenfield, Mass. station site on a siding of the westbound Fitchburg Div. main. By the early 1980's it had been moved to the East Deerfield Yard where it sat for some additional years. From there it disappeared but whether it was simply moved again to some unknown location or scrapped I cannot state. Sorting through a large box of older negatives and photos here in recent weeks I ran across a photo of it taken in Greenfield these many years ago. I have always felt the Ambroid model was a fairly good rendition of this unusual piece of equipment. Perhaps I should find the photo again, scan it an post it here."

WUTX 7559 at East Deerfield MA, November 17, 1973, Steve Brayton photo, posted on George Elwood's website:


Ben Hom


James SANDIFER
 

That was the first Ambroid Kit I ever built. I sold it a few years ago as it did not match my layout or era.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Thursday, March 28, 2019 5:31 AM
To: STMFC <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid Western Union Material Car

 

Ambroid Western Union Material Car ad, October 1959 issue of Model Railroader.





Ben Hom

 


Paul R Greenwald
 

Built one if these in 1960 or 1961 while in high school. Still have it (packed away after downsizing).  Have to dig it out when we get back  from FL.
--
Paul R Greenwald 
PRRT&HS #1802
NMRA #129229


Denny Anspach
 

I love this Ambroid car (one of my layout as we speak), but have always wondered about the passenger diaphragm on one end.  Were these cars designed/equipped for occasional operation on passenger trains, or was the diaphragm there to provide protected entrance and egress if the car was coupled  -parked or underway-  to a related bunk/dormitory/WU official car?

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864




mofwcaboose
 

Second guess is correct. The camp cars were converted wooden Pullmans which already had diaphragms, so the tool and material cars had them, but only at  one end because that was their position in the outfit plan...at the ends of the train.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Mar 29, 2019 1:56 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid Western Union Material Car

I love this Ambroid car (one of my layout as we speak), but have always wondered about the passenger diaphragm on one end.  Were these cars designed/equipped for occasional operation on passenger trains, or was the diaphragm there to provide protected entrance and egress if the car was coupled  -parked or underway-  to a related bunk/dormitory/WU official car?

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864