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Painting a real wood reefer kit.


Scott
 

I am building an old wood 40ft DRGW NG reefer kit.  The body is entirely wood.  The directions say to paint body first, then apply details, then touch up paint.  Makes sense to protect the wood from oils and dirt from soaking in before painting I suppose.  Besides a few wood running boards I have never painted an entire wood car.  I would assume I would need an oil based paint so it doesn't raise the grain.  I am wondering if I can use Scale coat 1 without a primer or should I spray it with Tamiya Fine then Scale coat 1?

Thanks
Scott McDonald


radiodial868
 

Having built many a wood traction model, I build the bodies first, and then apply coats of lacquer sanding sealer, removing any fuzz that gets highlighted this way, and then apply details, and then apply the Scalecoat final color.  If you don't seal the wood, the grain and wood surface (out of scale) will always show even after paint.  I use Deft brand currently. Some models can take 3-4 light coats depending on the wood.
RJ Dial
Burlingame, CA


Randy Hees
 

Scribbed wood is best first sealed with some kind of "sanding sealer".... I used shellac in the past.  Shoelace is alcohol based.  Then lightly sand or steel wool to smooth, then paint.  If sealed even acrylic will likely work.  You want to be careful not to fill in the scribbed lines with paint. Start with a light grey primer, then the yellow or orange as needed for the car...  Yellow in particular does not cover well, hence the need for the grey primer.

If per chance this is a Tiffany car, (DSP&P or C&S) don't fall into the trap of a white car, they are more likely a light green or yellow...  The white 4 wheel cabooses were not white either... 

Randy Hees


Charles Happel
 

In the past, I have found it useful to thin sanding sealer to avoid filling in the scribes.

Chuck Happel

I intend to live forever, or die trying. Groucho Marx

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On Thu, 4/25/19, Randy Hees <randyhees@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting a real wood reefer kit.
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Date: Thursday, April 25, 2019, 11:30 PM

Scribbed wood is best
first sealed with some kind of "sanding
sealer".... I used shellac in the past.  Shoelace is
alcohol based.  Then lightly sand or steel wool to smooth,
then paint.  If sealed even acrylic will likely work.  You
want to be careful not to fill in the scribbed lines with
paint. Start with a light grey primer, then the yellow or
orange as needed for the car...  Yellow in particular does
not cover well, hence the need for the grey primer.
If per chance this is a Tiffany car, (DSP&P
or C&S) don't fall into the trap of a white car,
they are more likely a light green or yellow...  The white
4 wheel cabooses were not white either... 
Randy Hees


Nelson Moyer
 

If you prefer using an acrylic wood sealer, look for PinePro at shops that sell pinewood derby cars and supplies. I used PinePro on two wood cars with Northeastern Lumber Co. clerestory roof shapes to seal and level the wood grain. Depending on the depth of the grain, it may take a couple of coats with sanding in between. If you’ve ever seen a nicely built pinewood derby car, you will appreciate how hard and smooth the finish on those cars can be.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Randy Hees
Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2019 10:30 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting a real wood reefer kit.

 

Scribbed wood is best first sealed with some kind of "sanding sealer".... I used shellac in the past.  Shoelace is alcohol based.  Then lightly sand or steel wool to smooth, then paint.  If sealed even acrylic will likely work.  You want to be careful not to fill in the scribbed lines with paint. Start with a light grey primer, then the yellow or orange as needed for the car...  Yellow in particular does not cover well, hence the need for the grey primer.

 

If per chance this is a Tiffany car, (DSP&P or C&S) don't fall into the trap of a white car, they are more likely a light green or yellow...  The white 4 wheel cabooses were not white either... 

 

Randy Hees


Tony Thompson
 

Chuck Happel wrote:

In the past, I have found it useful to thin sanding sealer to avoid filling in the scribes.
But we agree that scribed siding is exaggerated, and the wood product is even more so. Wouldn't it be an ADVANTAGE if the sealer fills in the scribes? <vbg>

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Edward
 

The main appearance snag in wood "V" shaped scribing being filled in, is that it results in a shallow dent along the otherwise too deep, too wide scribed line.
Ed Bommer


Charles Peck
 

For those who object to visible scribing, would it not be feasible 
to turn the precut wood side around?  This would present the 
blank, unscribed side to view.  If this is too plain for individual 
taste, perhaps a few scratches with course sandpaper would hint 
at the presence of individual boards.  
Chuck Peck

On Fri, Apr 26, 2019 at 10:27 AM Edward <edb8391@...> wrote:
The main appearance snag in wood "V" shaped scribing being filled in, is that it results in a shallow dent along the otherwise too deep, too wide scribed line.
Ed Bommer


Dave Parker
 

If the V-grooves are exaggerated in width and depth, the simple fix is to sand the surface down until they are at the desired profile.  I have a project in the works where I am doing this for a wood roof where the T&G boards are square-edge.  When finished, there will be barely visible (and variable) scribe lines.

BTW, the easiest way to deal with the fuzzy grain problem with basswood is to raise the grain several times with water, sanding with progressively finer paper between applications.  Then a single coat of sanding sealer, although I am not fully convinced it is necessary.  This is how woodworkers deal with water-based (and even alcohol-based) finishing products.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Tony Thompson
 

Ed Bommer wrote:

The main appearance snag in wood "V" shaped scribing being filled in, is that it results in a shallow dent along the otherwise too deep, too wide scribed line.

    True. I was thinking of the Northeastern type of siding with deep, rectangular grooves in it. As someone once said of that siding, "wrong on both counts."

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Scott
 

Thank you for the replies.  It is an Alamosa car shop kit.   When I get home tonight I will post some pictures of it.  I am only into the kit for $35.00 so if the build goes into the ditch it isnt a huge loss.

Scott McDonald


Denny Anspach
 

Like others reporting, I have been building wood (and wood and paper) railroad models since I was a child, and as we speak, I have finished three more.  Most in later years have been passenger cars, but there have been a number of freight as well.  It is a very satisfying traditional medium to work with, not the least of which because it can be challenging at times.  Some years ago on this list was a thread of disdain for wood as incapable of being a part of RPM, which for many was a rallying cry for   “We’ ll show you!”, and….we certainly made a try. Very recently I finished/rebuilt an HO 1939 (kit production date)  Comet PLUTO WATER  wood and paper model kit.  For some weeks. it honorably served amongst its resin, plastic, and metal RPM fellow layout cars before being dispatch to a better life in the hands of a fine fellow modeler far away in another state.  

Two big issues plague wood models: the reaching for a smooth surface by filling in the grain; and meticulously keeping the glue totally within the joint alone and not squeezed out.  (How many otherwise beautiful wood models have I picked over at Flea Markets that had more glue spilled outside the joints than within; and/or paint applied over raw wood without filling?)

I fill my wood traditionally with refined Model Sanding filler (commonly available at R-C stores), a filler that combines pumice with clear lacquer.  I have used this for probably 50 years or so.  I also now use Tamiya Sanding surfacer (filler) which comes in a very high quality rattle can.  The latter provides a uniform smooth monocolor  background that allows much easier detection of dirt and flaws. 

Although one can do some sanding before application of the surfacer/filler, the real sanding effectiveness comes after the filler has caused all of the grain to stiffly stand up or stand proud ready for the sandpaper (max needed 320 grit) to mow it down. I use sandpaper of all shapes and sizes to reach all the nooks and crannies, and I use several variety of brushes to vigorously clean out seams etc.  If you are filling seams and are not wanting to do so, there is something wrong, commonly over-application, or failure to clear the seams before hand.  

For glue, my general firm go-to is Krystal Klear:  there is adequate working time,  sufficient adherance strength, and easy water clean up. I do use thick ACC, Barge, and  high quality epoxies also to take advantage of the specific special qualities that each exhibit.  

  

The common issues
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864




WILLIAM PARDIE
 


Above are two wood cars that I did many years ago (before the days of resin).  In the lower photo the wood car  I recall I used scalecoat on these cars without any sanding sealer except for the roofs.  I’m ssure that Andy Carlson would be critical of the deep groves, however, I feel that these cars still stand tall next to cars that have been completed in different media in rfecent times.

Bill Pardie


Tim O'Connor
 

Bill

I doubt that Andy would criticize those deep grooves - it's not in his nature to pick on such
models. :-) Most of us can appreciate older models with various deficiencies just as we can
appreciate newer efforts to reach museum quality perfection. And a well built model is
almost always appreciated!

Tim O'

On 4/27/2019 12:51 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:

Above are two wood cars that I did many years ago (before the days of resin).  In the lower photo the wood car  I recall I used scalecoat on these cars without any sanding sealer except for the roofs.  I’m ssure that Andy Carlson would be critical of the deep groves, however, I feel that these cars still stand tall next to cars that have been completed in different media in rfecent times.

Bill Pardie

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Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts