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NJI&I Boxcar


Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

While skimming through the Ed Wilkommen photos, I noted this view which included an NJI&I boxcar: https://www.lakestatesarchive.org/Ed-Wilkommen-Collection/Freight-Cars/i-r5ZmB9k/A . Besides being a rather rare roadname in its own right, I was struck by the initials above the reporting marks. They look like "GN-I" or GH-I". Any comments about what they mean?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


Eric Hansmann
 

I think the letters are GM-1. Could this car be in a pool service for automobile parts?

I like the nine-post gondola.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On April 29, 2019 at 2:23 AM Garth Groff <sarahsan@...> wrote:

Friends,

While skimming through the Ed Wilkommen photos, I noted this view which included an NJI&I boxcar: https://www.lakestatesarchive.org/Ed-Wilkommen-Collection/Freight-Cars/i-r5ZmB9k/A . Besides being a rather rare roadname in its own right, I was struck by the initials above the reporting marks. They look like "GN-I" or GH-I". Any comments about what they mean?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


 


 




Tim O'Connor
 


Either an appliance or automobile parts pool assignment. Usually a good indicator that the
car has special equipment or loading devices - could be as simple as pallets that stayed with
the car. In the auto industry the pool assignment stencils were frequently changed.

Tim O'Connor


On 4/29/2019 4:23 AM, Garth Groff wrote:
Friends,

While skimming through the Ed Wilkommen photos, I noted this view which included an NJI&I boxcar: https://www.lakestatesarchive.org/Ed-Wilkommen-Collection/Freight-Cars/i-r5ZmB9k/A . Besides being a rather rare roadname in its own right, I was struck by the initials above the reporting marks. They look like "GN-I" or GH-I". Any comments about what they mean?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Peter Weiglin
 

Here's the first part of the Wikipedia entry on the New Jersey, Indiana and Illinois Railroad.  It'll be a conversation piee, all right.

Peter Weiglin
= = =

The NJI&I was originally created by the Singer Sewing Machine Company in order to transport their products from South Bend, IN, to a connection with the Wabash Railroad in Pine, Indiana. The line began service in 1905 and officially operated on only 11.4 miles of track. The line ran between South Bend and Pine, Indiana, where it met the Wabash Railroad.

Up until and through World War I the line offered two passenger trains round trip daily to Detroit. In the 1930s passenger service was discontinued. The Wabash had purchased the line in 1926 but continued to operate it as a separate railroad.

The major customers included Singer Manufacturing and The Studebaker Company. The NJI&I continued in service until 1982 when the Norfork Southern absorbed the line. Despite both manufacturers going out of business in the early 1960s and early 1970s, the line continued to operate for several other smaller customers.

The name is derived from the three states Singer had plants in at the time of charter. The railroad was eventually taken over by the Wabash and operated through the Norfolk and Western takeover. The line continued to service several customers until the NS-Conrail takeover allowed NS to access their customers via the former New York Central Chicago line. The line was abandoned and removed in the late 1990s.


Peter Hall
 

Just out of curiosity, how long would it take to load or unload autos into or out of an automobile box car equipped with auto racks, in the 1945-1950 era?

Thanks
Pete

On Apr 29, 2019, at 12:48 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Either an appliance or automobile parts pool assignment. Usually a good indicator that the
car has special equipment or loading devices - could be as simple as pallets that stayed with
the car. In the auto industry the pool assignment stencils were frequently changed.

Tim O'Connor


On 4/29/2019 4:23 AM, Garth Groff wrote:
Friends,

While skimming through the Ed Wilkommen photos, I noted this view which included an NJI&I boxcar: https://www.lakestatesarchive.org/Ed-Wilkommen-Collection/Freight-Cars/i-r5ZmB9k/A . Besides being a rather rare roadname in its own right, I was struck by the initials above the reporting marks. They look like "GN-I" or GH-I". Any comments about what they mean?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Peter,

I don't know the answer to your question, but it would be quite a while. Each of the two cars chained to the floor would have to be unchained, then worked out with a swiveling jack. Then the two cars in the diagonal racks would be lowered, unchained, and likewise worked out the door with the jack. How long might depend on how many men there were to do tasks simultaneously, but I would expect at least an hour or more per boxcar.

The car in question is a apparently in a parts pool, so the above does not apply. If "GM-1" is correct as was suggested, then it probably means "General Motors pool #1". Likely it had racks for some sort of sub-assemblies, say frames, motors, transmissions, body stampings, etc. The ends on this car mark it as 10' IH. This number does not show in my 1958 ORER, and likely post-dates our period, at least as an NJI&I-lettered car.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 4/29/19 5:03 PM, Peter Hall wrote:
Just out of curiosity, how long would it take to load or unload autos into or out of an automobile box car equipped with auto racks, in the 1945-1950 era?

Thanks
Pete

On Apr 29, 2019, at 12:48 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Either an appliance or automobile parts pool assignment. Usually a good indicator that the
car has special equipment or loading devices - could be as simple as pallets that stayed with
the car. In the auto industry the pool assignment stencils were frequently changed.

Tim O'Connor


On 4/29/2019 4:23 AM, Garth Groff wrote:
Friends,

While skimming through the Ed Wilkommen photos, I noted this view which included an NJI&I boxcar: https://www.lakestatesarchive.org/Ed-Wilkommen-Collection/Freight-Cars/i-r5ZmB9k/A . Besides being a rather rare roadname in its own right, I was struck by the initials above the reporting marks. They look like "GN-I" or GH-I". Any comments about what they mean?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts



Peter Hall
 

Thank you!

Thanks
Pete

On Apr 29, 2019, at 5:47 PM, Garth Groff <sarahsan@...> wrote:

Peter,

I don't know the answer to your question, but it would be quite a while. Each of the two cars chained to the floor would have to be unchained, then worked out with a swiveling jack. Then the two cars in the diagonal racks would be lowered, unchained, and likewise worked out the door with the jack. How long might depend on how many men there were to do tasks simultaneously, but I would expect at least an hour or more per boxcar.

The car in question is a apparently in a parts pool, so the above does not apply. If "GM-1" is correct as was suggested, then it probably means "General Motors pool #1". Likely it had racks for some sort of sub-assemblies, say frames, motors, transmissions, body stampings, etc. The ends on this car mark it as 10' IH. This number does not show in my 1958 ORER, and likely post-dates our period, at least as an NJI&I-lettered car.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 4/29/19 5:03 PM, Peter Hall wrote:
Just out of curiosity, how long would it take to load or unload autos into or out of an automobile box car equipped with auto racks, in the 1945-1950 era?

Thanks
Pete

On Apr 29, 2019, at 12:48 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Either an appliance or automobile parts pool assignment. Usually a good indicator that the
car has special equipment or loading devices - could be as simple as pallets that stayed with
the car. In the auto industry the pool assignment stencils were frequently changed.

Tim O'Connor


On 4/29/2019 4:23 AM, Garth Groff wrote:
Friends,

While skimming through the Ed Wilkommen photos, I noted this view which included an NJI&I boxcar: https://www.lakestatesarchive.org/Ed-Wilkommen-Collection/Freight-Cars/i-r5ZmB9k/A . Besides being a rather rare roadname in its own right, I was struck by the initials above the reporting marks. They look like "GN-I" or GH-I". Any comments about what they mean?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts