Topics

Meat Reefer routing


John Barry
 

Obviously meat reefers were routed from the large packing houses to the distributors, but who were the distributors? I'm beginning to think that the large brands such as Swift, Cudahay, etc. shipped to their own distributor network who then sold to grocers, butchers and other wholesalers locally.  I base this partly on the 1943 Oakland City Directory listing for Meat Wholesalers which includes Cudahay at 222 3rd street, right on the WP line into Oakland.  It is in an industrial area with no room for a stock yard, just inland from the Santa Fe's Alice Street facilities.  Swift is several blocks west on the WP line at 312 Clay Street.  Morrell is between them on the next street toward the water at 364 2nd Street.  These distributorship facilities may give you a reason to include your favorite meat reefer on your layout, even if they didn't have a slaughterhouse and stockyards.



John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736


On Saturday, June 15, 2019, 8:23:22 AM EDT, mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...> wrote:


Not to derail the paint discussion, but I just noticed that both of these reefers have, on the roof, the characteristic angle just outboard of the hatches that was standard on ART cars.  They also have the characteristic horizontal seam.

Were these cars built by ACF (or someone else) to an ART design?

Ron Merrick


Douglas Harding
 

The large major meat packers all had branch houses. Armour and Swift had hundreds. These were places that received hanging meat, ie carcasses, in company reefers, from the company slaughter houses. The carcasses were then processed, ie cut into meat cuts, for distribution to meat buyers. Think grocery warehouses, meat markets, hotel and restaurant concerns and institutions like schools, prisons, military base, etc. Many of the branch houses had a fleet of delivery trucks.

 

In addition to branch houses, hanging meat was also shipped directly to places like grocery warehouses, where the carcasses were processed. Think of anyone purchasing large quantities of meat.

 

For operations a branch house only received reefers from the company slaughter house: ie Swift to Swift, Armour to Armour, etc. But a private buyer, like a grocery warehouse or military based could receive reefers from many different slaughter houses. If you want to run a string of Armour reefers, then model an Armour branch house. But if you want to run a variety of meat reefers, then model a cold storage building or an grocery warehouse, or perhaps a commissary for the military or railroad.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of John Barry
Sent: Saturday, June 15, 2019 7:54 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Meat Reefer routing

 

Obviously meat reefers were routed from the large packing houses to the distributors, but who were the distributors? I'm beginning to think that the large brands such as Swift, Cudahay, etc. shipped to their own distributor network who then sold to grocers, butchers and other wholesalers locally.  I base this partly on the 1943 Oakland City Directory listing for Meat Wholesalers which includes Cudahay at 222 3rd street, right on the WP line into Oakland.  It is in an industrial area with no room for a stock yard, just inland from the Santa Fe's Alice Street facilities.  Swift is several blocks west on the WP line at 312 Clay Street.  Morrell is between them on the next street toward the water at 364 2nd Street.  These distributorship facilities may give you a reason to include your favorite meat reefer on your layout, even if they didn't have a slaughterhouse and stockyards.

 

 

 

John Barry

 

ATSF North Bay Lines 

Golden Gates & Fast Freights 

Lovettsville, VA

 

707-490-9696 

 

PO Box 44736 

Washington, DC 20026-4736

 

 

On Saturday, June 15, 2019, 8:23:22 AM EDT, mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...> wrote:

 

 

Not to derail the paint discussion, but I just noticed that both of these reefers have, on the roof, the characteristic angle just outboard of the hatches that was standard on ART cars.  They also have the characteristic horizontal seam.

Were these cars built by ACF (or someone else) to an ART design?

Ron Merrick