Soo Line Box Car 45398


Lester Breuer
 

I have upgraded a plastic Front Range Soo Line steel box car 45398.  The upgrade included replacing running boards, seven rung ladders with plastic eight rung ladders on the sides and seven rung ladders on the ends to match the prototype ladders in photos.  And, underbody rework.  If you are interested in viewing photos of finished car and writeup of the build, you can on my blog I started to share photos and writeup of modeling projects on my Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company.   If you would like to take a look please do at the following link:

 

http://mnrailroadcab100.blogspot.com/

Lester Breuer


O Fenton Wells
 

Nice looking cars Lester, when did the SOO go to the large block lettering?
Fenton Wells

On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 9:38 AM Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:

I have upgraded a plastic Front Range Soo Line steel box car 45398.  The upgrade included replacing running boards, seven rung ladders with plastic eight rung ladders on the sides and seven rung ladders on the ends to match the prototype ladders in photos.  And, underbody rework.  If you are interested in viewing photos of finished car and writeup of the build, you can on my blog I started to share photos and writeup of modeling projects on my Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company.   If you would like to take a look please do at the following link:

 

http://mnrailroadcab100.blogspot.com/

Lester Breuer



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Lester Breuer
 

Fenton asked, “ when did the Soo Line go to the large block lettering?”
In the “Soo Line Freight Equipment and Cabooses” book by Ken Soroos it states, “the billboard Soo Line lettering was first introduced on new box cars in 1951.”  The large block lettering began with a slant in the middle bar of the  “S” in Soo and I believe  it became straight across in 1959.
Lester Breuer


Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 12:11 PM, O Fenton Wells wrote:
Nice looking cars Lester, when did the SOO go to the large block lettering?
Not to steal Lester's thunder on a very nice model, but to answer your question, very late 1951. The model has a 10-51 NEW date, and I know the art was prepared from a photo. The "billboard" SOO LINE went through three iterations in very rapid succession; this scheme with the SOO and LINE close to the door was the first, followed by spreading them out for better visual balance, but still high on the car side, followed by moving the lettering down so it would line up with the same scheme applied to the earlier 10'-0" and 9'-4" IH cars when they were eventually repainted. Lester's last pointer to his blog had a link to a photo of the second iteration, and it had an 11-51 NEW date. I don't think anyone has ever been able to compile a list of all the car numbers for each version, this was one continuous building program at North Fond du Lac, but the output was assigned to either the Soo, or subsidiary Wisconsin Central seemingly at random, since I believe there are known examples of all three iterations in both number series. Anyway, once the lettering was in the lower spread out position it stayed that way, but about 1957 the style of the S was changed to have a horizontal, rather than angled, center bar.

More than you wanted to know, I'm sure.

Dennis Storzek 


Tim O'Connor
 

Soo Line box car paint and lettering are a subject of study. Attached
are photos of 45450 and 137096 in their original paint schemes from the
SAME MONTH - November 1951. Also attached 45948 with a 7-1954 paint date
and 43490 as 12-1956 repaint.

Tim O'

On 7/1/2019 5:07 PM, Lester Breuer wrote:
Fenton asked, “ when did the Soo Line go to the large block lettering?”
In the “Soo Line Freight Equipment and Cabooses” book by Ken Soroos it states, “the billboard Soo Line lettering was first introduced on new box cars in 1951.”  The large block lettering began with a slant in the middle bar of the  “S” in Soo and I believe  it became straight across in 1959.
Lester Breuer
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 06:13 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
Attached
are photos of 45450 and 137096 in their original paint schemes from the
SAME MONTH - November 1951.
45450 is the second iteration of the "billboard block" lettering, after the words were spread out for visual balance but before they were lowered. W.C. owned 13096 was built within weeks of Lester's 45398, part of the same production run. 

One other thing, after this program finished, when the next homebuilds started in 1953, no more black ends... on repaints either.

Dennis Storzek


Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 06:50 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
45450 is the second iteration of the "billboard block" lettering, after the words were spread out for visual balance but before they were lowered. W.C. owned 13096 was built within weeks of Lester's 45398, part of the same production run. 
Just thought to check the Ken Soroos Soo freight cars book. It contains a photo of WC owned 137190, also built 11-51, in the second iteration, proving that all three variations of the lettering scheme were represented in both number series, but how many cars is anybody's guess.

Dennis Storzek


Charles Peck
 

Does anyone know the story behind the Soo Line car out in the street with one truck almost out and the other shoved up way under?
Chuck Peck

On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 9:14 PM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Soo Line box car paint and lettering are a subject of study. Attached
are photos of 45450 and 137096 in their original paint schemes from the
SAME MONTH - November 1951. Also attached 45948 with a 7-1954 paint date
and 43490 as 12-1956 repaint.

Tim O'



On 7/1/2019 5:07 PM, Lester Breuer wrote:
> Fenton asked, “ when did the Soo Line go to the large block lettering?”
> In the “Soo Line Freight Equipment and Cabooses” book by Ken Soroos it
> states, “the billboard Soo Line lettering was first introduced on new
> box cars in 1951.”  The large block lettering began with a slant in
> the middle bar of the  “S” in Soo and I believe  it became straight
> across in 1959.
> Lester Breuer


--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*




Andy Carlson
 

As this Soo car was a Front Range 40' car, notice it had, as all of those F.R. cars had, 1955 Banana taper improved Dreadnaught ends. The tooling for this F.R. car was sold to Red Caboose (The 50' steel F.R. car's tooling ended up in Accurail's possistion).
So any car being modeled with a build date precedeing 1955 would have the wrong ends with this car. When Red Caboose acquired this tooling, they retooled the doors and ladders and bracket grabs. (The sales were so low that I was told RC never recaptured their investment). I was never a fan of FR's improved Youngstown doors and feel that the RC doors are arguably the best 6' and 8' IYDs in HO-horray!

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA where low 80 highs all this week makes this early summer time quite enjoyable.


_._,_._,

_._,_._,_


Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 07:52 PM, Charles Peck wrote:
Does anyone know the story behind the Soo Line car out in the street with one truck almost out and the other shoved up way under?
I seem to recall it was a switching accident in St. Louis. The spur dropped down from an elevated ROW (note shadow of bridge in foreground). The car got away and went over the wheel stops at the end of the track and out into the street.

Dennis Storzek


Jack Mullen
 

On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 07:52 PM, Charles Peck wrote:
Does anyone know the story behind the Soo Line car out in the street with one truck almost out and the other shoved up way under?
The displaced trucks are suggestive of a car that's gone over a bumping post or other end-of-track obstacle.

Jack Mullen


Jack Mullen
 

Here are some other photos of the scene, showing the spur where the car got away. Sometimes Google is your friend if you're patient and persistent. ;^)
https://www.westernrailimages.com/Mopac/Mopac-Missouri-Pacific-Railway/i-SvRPt5L
https://www.westernrailimages.com/Mopac/Mopac-Missouri-Pacific-Railway/i-6FrRHnV/A
You can scroll to  more photos of this incident. 

The second car, a CNW riveted PS-1, seems to have had one truck off the end of the track and been rerailed before the photographer got there.

Jack Mullen


Lester Breuer
 

On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 09:10 PM, Andy Carlson wrote:
As this Soo car was a Front Range 40' car, notice it had, as all of those F.R. cars had, 1955 Banana taper improved Dreadnaught ends. ......So any car being modeled with a build date precedeing 1955 would have the wrong ends with this car.
Andy I was aware when I upgraded this car as the previous upgraded one based on photos that it should have dreadnaught ends of “rolling pin” design which are quite visible in the photo of Soo Line photo 45450 making the cars upgraded  “stand ins.”  I still have a couple of kits in inventory to build.  My question, “If you were to cut the ends off and replace them, whose commercial ends could be used?  And, whose would you use?”
Lester Breuer




 
 


O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks Dennis great info. I’ve always liked that scheme but felt it was too new for my October 1953 era. I have Ted’s decals so I’ll give it a go. I saved Lester’s blog as well
👍
Fenton 


On Jul 1, 2019, at 5:18 PM, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 12:11 PM, O Fenton Wells wrote:
Nice looking cars Lester, when did the SOO go to the large block lettering?
Not to steal Lester's thunder on a very nice model, but to answer your question, very late 1951. The model has a 10-51 NEW date, and I know the art was prepared from a photo. The "billboard" SOO LINE went through three iterations in very rapid succession; this scheme with the SOO and LINE close to the door was the first, followed by spreading them out for better visual balance, but still high on the car side, followed by moving the lettering down so it would line up with the same scheme applied to the earlier 10'-0" and 9'-4" IH cars when they were eventually repainted. Lester's last pointer to his blog had a link to a photo of the second iteration, and it had an 11-51 NEW date. I don't think anyone has ever been able to compile a list of all the car numbers for each version, this was one continuous building program at North Fond du Lac, but the output was assigned to either the Soo, or subsidiary Wisconsin Central seemingly at random, since I believe there are known examples of all three iterations in both number series. Anyway, once the lettering was in the lower spread out position it stayed that way, but about 1957 the style of the S was changed to have a horizontal, rather than angled, center bar.

More than you wanted to know, I'm sure.

Dennis Storzek 


Andy Carlson
 

Either Branchline Trains or Intermountain would have the more correct Improved ends; select the one with the closest width for the F.R. car body.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Tuesday, July 2, 2019, 5:16:28 AM PDT, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:


On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 09:10 PM, Andy Carlson wrote:
As this Soo car was a Front Range 40' car, notice it had, as all of those F.R. cars had, 1955 Banana taper improved Dreadnaught ends. ......So any car being modeled with a build date precedeing 1955 would have the wrong ends with this car.
Andy I was aware when I upgraded this car as the previous upgraded one based on photos that it should have dreadnaught ends of “rolling pin” design which are quite visible in the photo of Soo Line photo 45450 making the cars upgraded  “stand ins.”  I still have a couple of kits in inventory to build.  My question, “If you were to cut the ends off and replace them, whose commercial ends could be used?  And, whose would you use?”
Lester Breuer




 
 

_._,_._,_


mopacfirst
 

Maybe this is not relevant for the purpose of upgrading and painting a car, but Branchline did a set of four Soo cars each with a slightly different lettering arrangement based on cars built over a span of a couple of years.

Ron Merrick


O Fenton Wells
 

Again great info, thanks.  One more question does anyone the car numbers which had black ends and roof?
Fenton

On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 10:20 PM Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:
On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 06:50 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
45450 is the second iteration of the "billboard block" lettering, after the words were spread out for visual balance but before they were lowered. W.C. owned 13096 was built within weeks of Lester's 45398, part of the same production run. 
Just thought to check the Ken Soroos Soo freight cars book. It contains a photo of WC owned 137190, also built 11-51, in the second iteration, proving that all three variations of the lettering scheme were represented in both number series, but how many cars is anybody's guess.

Dennis Storzek



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Lester,

The FR body with the "banana-taper ends" is more or less correct for Soo 46700-47698 (even numbers only) built by Soo in 1956, and 47700-48298 (again, even only) built by Soo in 1957. The cars should have 8-rung ladders. There is a photo of one in MW service in Ed Hawkins' article in the July 1999 RMJ.

I have one built from the FR body lettered with Champ decals, and what I think were Tichy 8-rung ladders. Someday I will replace the running boards with something better.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 7/2/19 8:16 AM, Lester Breuer wrote:

On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 09:10 PM, Andy Carlson wrote:
As this Soo car was a Front Range 40' car, notice it had, as all of those F.R. cars had, 1955 Banana taper improved Dreadnaught ends. ......So any car being modeled with a build date precedeing 1955 would have the wrong ends with this car.
Andy I was aware when I upgraded this car as the previous upgraded one based on photos that it should have dreadnaught ends of “rolling pin” design which are quite visible in the photo of Soo Line photo 45450 making the cars upgraded  “stand ins.”  I still have a couple of kits in inventory to build.  My question, “If you were to cut the ends off and replace them, whose commercial ends could be used?  And, whose would you use?”
Lester Breuer




 
 


Tim O'Connor
 


This was an accident on King's Highway (?) in St Louis, October 15, 1954




On 7/2/2019 12:25 AM, Jack Mullen wrote:

On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 07:52 PM, Charles Peck wrote:
Does anyone know the story behind the Soo Line car out in the street with one truck almost out and the other shoved up way under?
The displaced trucks are suggestive of a car that's gone over a bumping post or other end-of-track obstacle.

Jack Mullen

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts