Topics

Handbrakes


Bob Chaparro
 

I understand that in 1937 power (geared) handbrakes required on all newly-built or newly-rebuilt cars.

Were non-power handbrakes every specifically outlawed or banned?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Bruce Smith
 

Bob,


Since about 2005, a list of the AAR interchange rule dates has been posted in the FILES section of this group 😉 It is even in both WORD and EXCEL formats depending on your preference.


That file, when searched for "geared" or "power" yields the following:


January 1, 1937, "Geared handbrakes required on all newly-built or newly-rebuilt cars."


There is no subsequent ban (AAR interchange) or outlaw (Federal law) date given for geared handbrakes.


As a reminder to some of our list members, geared (or "power") handbrakes does NOT mean exclusively horizontal shaft/vertical wheel handbrakes. Many vertical shaft/horizontal wheel installations had gearing to assist the brakeman in applying the brakes and would therefore have been considered "allowed" under these rules.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...>
Sent: Saturday, July 6, 2019 1:48 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Handbrakes
 

I understand that in 1937 power (geared) handbrakes required on all newly-built or newly-rebuilt cars.

Were non-power handbrakes every specifically outlawed or banned?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Bob Chaparro
 

"Many vertical shaft/horizontal wheel installations had gearing to assist the brakeman in applying the brakes and would therefore have been considered "allowed" under these rules."
Yes...two examples from my own files. The first photo is from 1957 and the second no earlier than 1960.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Dennis Storzek
 

On Sat, Jul 6, 2019 at 06:38 AM, Bruce Smith wrote:
As a reminder to some of our list members, geared (or "power") handbrakes does NOT mean exclusively horizontal shaft/vertical wheel handbrakes. Many vertical shaft/horizontal wheel installations had gearing to assist the brakeman in applying the brakes and would therefore have been considered "allowed" under these rules.
Yes, they were quite wide spread and hard to spot, since unlike Bob Chaparro's example which had the reduction gearing up at the roof eave, most examples brought the brake staff all the way down to the end sill, and tucked the reduction gearing beneath the sill. Anexample would be the CP "mini box" recently discussed:

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-06-28-19/X7177.jpg

I've also found similar gear on a 1926 Soo Line box:



And also on the Soo's 1936 copies of the 1932 ARA car:



Note this later car also has a square brake staff.

Dennis Storzek


Tim O'Connor
 


?? these were around since the 1930's if not earlier


On 7/6/2019 4:36 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io wrote:
"Many vertical shaft/horizontal wheel installations had gearing to assist the brakeman in applying the brakes and would therefore have been considered "allowed" under these rules."
Yes...two examples from my own files. The first photo is from 1957 and the second no earlier than 1960.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Attachments:

_._,_._,_



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Bill Welch
 

The C&O also had a similar geared brake design, an example can be found on Erie 1932 boxcars also w/square brake staff.

Bill Welch


Dennis Storzek
 

On Sun, Jul 7, 2019 at 04:08 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
?? these were around since the 1930's if not earlier
Yes, the 1931 CBC identifies that as a Klasing Safety Handbrake, Wheel Type. But the point is, it's obvious, with that large gear housing at the eave line, it won't be mistaken for the old time 'stem winders'. It also uses a chain, rod and bell crank rather than a simple brake staff. My point was a reasonable number of vertical staff hand brakes also used reduction gearing, but the gearing was almost hid under the end sill.

Dennis Storzek


Ted Schnepf
 

Hello,

Milwaukee Road stock cars built in 1929, have the same appearing hand brake.  The car diagram page states it is a Klassing Hand brake.

Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120


847=697-5353


On Sunday, July 7, 2019, 06:08:39 PM CDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



?? these were around since the 1930's if not earlier


On 7/6/2019 4:36 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io wrote:

"Many vertical shaft/horizontal wheel installations had gearing to assist the brakeman in applying the brakes and would therefore have been considered "allowed" under these rules."
Yes...two examples from my own files. The first photo is from 1957 and the second no earlier than 1960.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Attachments:




Tim O'Connor
 


Dennis I'd really like to see the reduction gearing you're describing. I've never
seen an example of that. They used a pawl and ratchet but that's not a gear box -
it gives no mechanical leverage.

Tim O'



On 7/7/2019 8:43 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
On Sun, Jul 7, 2019 at 04:08 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
?? these were around since the 1930's if not earlier
Yes, the 1931 CBC identifies that as a Klasing Safety Handbrake, Wheel Type. But the point is, it's obvious, with that large gear housing at the eave line, it won't be mistaken for the old time 'stem winders'. It also uses a chain, rod and bell crank rather than a simple brake staff. My point was a reasonable number of vertical staff hand brakes also used reduction gearing, but the gearing was almost hid under the end sill.

Dennis Storzek

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tom Madden
 

On Sun, Jul 7, 2019 at 11:33 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
Dennis I'd really like to see the reduction gearing you're describing. I've never
seen an example of that. They used a pawl and ratchet but that's not a gear box -
it gives no mechanical leverage.
Dennis already posted two photos showing reduction gearing at the bottom of  vertical brake staffs. Post #165331.

Tom Madden
 


Bill Welch
 

Photo of the C&O type is in the 1932 Boxcar book. Look for the "B" end photo of the ERIE car. I modeled using 1.5 Grams of watch parts ordered through eBay. Plenty of actual gears to choose from.

Bill Welch


Tim O'Connor
 


Thanks Tom (and Dennis), I missed that message... very good pics.

Tim


On 7/8/2019 1:54 AM, Tom Madden via Groups.Io wrote:
On Sun, Jul 7, 2019 at 11:33 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
Dennis I'd really like to see the reduction gearing you're describing. I've never
seen an example of that. They used a pawl and ratchet but that's not a gear box -
it gives no mechanical leverage.
Dennis already posted two photos showing reduction gearing at the bottom of  vertical brake staffs. Post #165331.

Tom Madden

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 

Wow Bill, I had no idea! What a gold mine of precision made junk! :-)

https://www.ebay.com/itm/312134661262

Tim O'Connor

==============================

On 7/8/2019 7:41 AM, Bill Welch wrote:
Photo of the C&O type is in the 1932 Boxcar book. Look for the "B" end photo of the ERIE car. I modeled using 1.5 Grams of watch parts ordered through eBay. Plenty of actual gears to choose from.

Bill Welch
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*