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Photo: Heavy Duty Milwaukee Road Flat Car 601051

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Heavy Duty Milwaukee Road Flat Car 601051

A photo from 1956:

https://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/milwaukee-road-rly-flat-car-loaded-with-tank

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Anyone know what the vessel is?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

mopacfirst
 

It looks like a coke drum.

In a delayed coker, which produces petroleum coke, the reaction occurs in the heater and on the way to the drum, where the coke settles out and the light hydrocarbon vapors go out the top.  Here, top is to the left as the drum is positioned on the flatcar.  The drum gradually fills with coke over an approximately 18-hour cycle, then when it's filled there's a switch valve that sends the stream of coke into another drum without stopping the flow.  Then the fun begins.  The drum is deheaded (opening the bottom "head") and high-pressure lances are used from the top to break up the 900 degree coke and send it out the bottom into a chute to the coke pile, where it becomes hopper car loads en route to coke users.  Once the drum is empty, it's kept warn until its turn comes to be re-filled.

Driving past a refinery, the coker unit is distinctive and plainly visible as two or three of these drums high up in a structure, with what looks like a drilling rig on top.  That's the structure that supports the process of lancing the coke.  The only nozzles on the drum, other than the vapor flow out near the top, are those small thermowell nozzles which are mounted at an angle along the drum to detect the temperatures inside the drum as it's filled.  The supports for the drum are at the top of the conical section, which is at the deheading deck level, sometimes called the tabletop.  In the steam era, the deheading was an extremely dirty and dangerous job.

Perhaps more than you wanted to know.

Ron Merrick

Tim O'Connor
 


A "pulp digester" according to my notes.



On 8/1/2019 3:33 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io wrote:

Photo: Heavy Duty Milwaukee Road Flat Car 601051

A photo from 1956:

https://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/milwaukee-road-rly-flat-car-loaded-with-tank

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Anyone know what the vessel is?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



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Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

espee4441
 

What route did this take to get to Vancouver? If it went MILW all the way then crossing the border at Sumas, Wa is the only option. Hard time seeing this being the case. Pulp digester makes more sense for the area around here, I wonder if this was trans-loaded onto a barge in Van. or made it all the way to final destination by rail.

That's one photo I really like, many thanks to you Bob for finding this.

Tony Pawley

David Soderblom
 

Would a large load like this have been included in a regular train, or would it have required it’s own engine and caboose?



David Soderblom
Baltimore MD USA
drs@...

Doug Polinder
 

Tony, couple of possibilities.  The yard in Vancouver is not identified.  Walter Frost took pictures in various yards belonging to CN, CP, and GN.  If this is a CP yard, the load could have traveled via Milwaukee to Seattle and then via their own rail-barge to Bellingham, thence to Sumas WA/Huntingdon BC for interchange with the CP.  Or it could have traveled to Seattle and been barged directly to Vancouver for interchange with CP, CN, or PGE.  If a GN yard, then GN may have picked it up in St. Paul and taken it all the way to Vancouver on GN rails (the Hill Lines generally forced the Milwaukee to interchange in St. Paul).

There are lots of pulp mills in Prince George, so a good possibility this was going via PGE through North Vancouver.

Doug Polinder
Poquoson VA

Tom Madden
 

On Fri, Aug 2, 2019 at 11:20 AM, Doug Polinder wrote:
There are lots of pulp mills in Prince George, so a good possibility this was going via PGE through North Vancouver.
The OP said it's a 1956 photo. When did PGE complete the line to North Vancouver? I remember a TRAINS article from the late '50s - early '60s regarding the hullabaloo that ensued when PGE decided to complete the line to N.V., disturbing a number of adjacent residents whose construction had encroached on what they assumed was an abandoned ROW.

Tom Madden

Doug Polinder
 

Tom, I think the line from North Van to Squamish along Howe Sound was completed in 1955.  A 1970s article in a Carstens pub (Railfan & Railroad, most likely) also described the furor when PGE started bulldozing gardens and filling in swimming pools.

Doug Polinder
Poquoson VA

espee4441
 
Edited

Loaded onto the barge in Seattle would have been interesting to say the least, I think that your GN option makes the most sense. I live right above the main here in White Rock and bringing in a special load like that then the easiest option would be GN. It could go MILW then on the boat from Seattle to B'ham and handed over to the GN with a much easier way to get into Vancouver. Going up Milw row to Sumas I still have a hard time seeing happen.   My earlier hope was it made its way north to Winnipeg and then west, fat chance.

Tony Pawley
White Rock, BC

Tim O'Connor
 


I remember Trains magazine ran BC op-ed newspaper cartoons from that era
that were pretty funny.


On 8/2/2019 2:40 PM, Tom Madden via Groups.Io wrote:
On Fri, Aug 2, 2019 at 11:20 AM, Doug Polinder wrote:
There are lots of pulp mills in Prince George, so a good possibility this was going via PGE through North Vancouver.
The OP said it's a 1956 photo. When did PGE complete the line to North Vancouver? I remember a TRAINS article from the late '50s - early '60s regarding the hullabaloo that ensued when PGE decided to complete the line to N.V., disturbing a number of adjacent residents whose construction had encroached on what they assumed was an abandoned ROW.

Tom Madden

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Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts