Metal Wheels


Mark Vinski
 

I have found it easier to adjust the sideframe width to the available axle length rather than trying to find an axle length that matches a particular sideframe.

I do this by bending the sideframe slightly wider or narrower until the truck rolls freely. Some over bending is required as the plastic will spring back slightly.

I have not tried this with metal sideframes which may break if flexed too much.

Mark Vinski


Alexander Schneider Jr
 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Alexander Schneider Jr
Sent: Thursday, August 8, 2019 2:48 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Metal Wheels

 

I just ordered three packages of direct replacement metal wheelsets from Bowser. Item 40198, $20.

Alex Schneider

 

On Wed, Aug 7, 2019 at 11:05 AM, Tim O'Connor


TICHY sells nylon journal bearing inserts that will allow
you to use much shorter axles. You drill/ream the sideframe
to take the insert. They work great with old brass trucks with
straight (not tapered) journals.

Tim O'Connor



On 8/7/2019 7:47 AM, Mark Stamm wrote:

The NMRA practice is what has me in a pickle. I have tons of Bowser H21 hoppers; my primary interest is the PRR. Those plastic wheels have to go and to my knowledge only Reboxx makes replacement sets in the 1.035 length. Any other wheel set I have tried has to much slop side to side. 
 
Mark P Stamm


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

     So it appears that once again the NMRA coild do the hobby a favor and promote a standard for axle size,
length and bearing style for the end as well. Has the NMRA actually upgraded any of its standards for such
things in the last 20 years?

Cordially, Don Valentine


Aley, Jeff A
 

A tedious, but not impossible, solution is to remove the plastic wheels from their axles, and press on suitable metal wheels.  I think it was Dennis Storzek who pointed out that pressing on an insulated wheel is easier than pressing on one that is not insulated.

 

It occurs to me that, in the absence of Reboxx, it would be helpful to have a chart of metal wheelsets and their axle lengths.  For example, we know that Tangent 33” wheels have 1.002” axles.

And we know that Intermountain have 1.006” axles.

 

Reboxx has a chart of trucks and the corresponding “ideal” axle length.  So we can see that Tangent wheels would be ideal for

Eastern Car Works ACF Express Reefer 9041 n/a 33-1-1.000 23

Eastern Car Works Barber S-2 Roller Bearing 9054 n/a 33-1-1.000 25

Eastern Car Works Bettendorf RB Conversion 9056 9 33-1-1.000 27

Eastern Car Works Dalman Two Level 9061 4 33-1-1.000 25

Eastern Car Works National C-1 Roller Bearing 9060 n/a 33-1-1.000 24

Eastern Car Works National Super C-1 100T RB 9062 0 33-1-1.000 27

Ertl Bettendorf 7 33-1-1.000 23

InterMountain Andrews w/plastic wheel 15 33-1-1.000 27

Old Pullman Andrews black label 40011 2 33-1-1.000 19

 

And we can see that Intermountain would be ideal for

Accurail Bettendorf 0100 12 33-1-1.010 22

E & C Barber S-2 w/metal wheels 0 33-1-1.010 15

Eastern Car Works 6 Wheel Buckeye Roller Bearing 9073/9083 n/a 33-1-1.010 14

Eastern Car Works 6 wheel Commonwealth Int. Pedestal 9071/9081 n/a 33-1-1.010 22

Eastern Car Works Bettendorf Friction Bearing 9053 10 33-1-1.010 16

Eastern Car Works Buckeye Friction Bearing 9072/9082 n/a 33-1-1.010 22

InterMountain Accurail Bettendorf w/metal wheels 18 33-1-1.010 22

InterMountain ASF 50T w/metal wheels, rigid 33-1-1.010 21

Mantua Bettendorf E1 18 33-1-1.010 19

Perfect Bettendorf talgo 444 10 33-1-1.010 18

Red Caboose T-Section Bettendorf equalized

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Carlson via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, August 08, 2019 1:08 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Metal Wheels

 

The problem with bowser wheels is they only come in code 110 and wheel face looks nothing like a real wheel. Same problem as the ugly BLI wheels on their tank cars. 

Brian J. Carlson 


On Aug 8, 2019, at 3:48 PM, Alexander Schneider Jr <aschneiderjr@...> wrote:

I just ordered three packages of direct replacement metal wheelsets from Bowser. Item 40198, $20.

Alex Schneider

 

On Wed, Aug 7, 2019 at 11:05 AM, Tim O'Connor

<timboconnor@...> wrote:


TICHY sells nylon journal bearing inserts that will allow
you to use much shorter axles. You drill/ream the sideframe
to take the insert. They work great with old brass trucks with
straight (not tapered) journals.

Tim O'Connor



On 8/7/2019 7:47 AM, Mark Stamm wrote:

The NMRA practice is what has me in a pickle. I have tons of Bowser H21 hoppers; my primary interest is the PRR. Those plastic wheels have to go and to my knowledge only Reboxx makes replacement sets in the 1.035 length. Any other wheel set I have tried has to much slop side to side. 
 
Mark P Stamm


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Brian Carlson
 

The problem with bowser wheels is they only come in code 110 and wheel face looks nothing like a real wheel. Same problem as the ugly BLI wheels on their tank cars. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Aug 8, 2019, at 3:48 PM, Alexander Schneider Jr <aschneiderjr@...> wrote:

I just ordered three packages of direct replacement metal wheelsets from Bowser. Item 40198, $20.

Alex Schneider

On Wed, Aug 7, 2019 at 11:05 AM, Tim O'Connor

TICHY sells nylon journal bearing inserts that will allow
you to use much shorter axles. You drill/ream the sideframe
to take the insert. They work great with old brass trucks with
straight (not tapered) journals.

Tim O'Connor



On 8/7/2019 7:47 AM, Mark Stamm wrote:

The NMRA practice is what has me in a pickle. I have tons of Bowser H21 hoppers; my primary interest is the PRR. Those plastic wheels have to go and to my knowledge only Reboxx makes replacement sets in the 1.035 length. Any other wheel set I have tried has to much slop side to side. 

Mark P Stamm

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Alexander Schneider Jr
 

I just ordered three packages of direct replacement metal wheelsets from Bowser. Item 40198, $20.

Alex Schneider

On Wed, Aug 7, 2019 at 11:05 AM, Tim O'Connor
<timboconnor@...> wrote:

TICHY sells nylon journal bearing inserts that will allow
you to use much shorter axles. You drill/ream the sideframe
to take the insert. They work great with old brass trucks with
straight (not tapered) journals.

Tim O'Connor



On 8/7/2019 7:47 AM, Mark Stamm wrote:

The NMRA practice is what has me in a pickle. I have tons of Bowser H21 hoppers; my primary interest is the PRR. Those plastic wheels have to go and to my knowledge only Reboxx makes replacement sets in the 1.035 length. Any other wheel set I have tried has to much slop side to side. 

Mark P Stamm

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Tim O'Connor
 


TICHY sells nylon journal bearing inserts that will allow
you to use much shorter axles. You drill/ream the sideframe
to take the insert. They work great with old brass trucks with
straight (not tapered) journals.

Tim O'Connor



On 8/7/2019 7:47 AM, Mark Stamm wrote:
The NMRA practice is what has me in a pickle. I have tons of Bowser H21 hoppers; my primary interest is the PRR. Those plastic wheels have to go and to my knowledge only Reboxx makes replacement sets in the 1.035 length. Any other wheel set I have tried has to much slop side to side. 

Mark P Stamm

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Aug 7, 2019 at 07:19 AM, Alexander Schneider Jr wrote:
...between the two Accurail designs of 1.010" and 1.025” would be a good “preferred” value. Lifelike seems to be the dominant replacement wheel at 1.015”.
I should correct one misconception that has crept in here... the Accurail truck tool was initially designed to accommodate our molded plastic wheels, and required metal replacement wheels with axles no longer than 1.005". As revised, it will accommodate axles up to 1.015".

I don't doubt that Doc Denny has found an Accurail truck that will accept an axle 1.025' long, but it's an outlier. All three Accurail trucks use the exact same inner mechanics to form the bearing cones, and I mean EXACTLY the same parts; only the side actions that have the sideframe detail are changed out. That's not to say that the varying thickness of the sideframes doesn't cause slightly different shrinkage, and polyacetal is a high shrink polymer, but those differences are going to get lost in the gradual change of the cavity dimensions as the movable parts that form the cones wear between maintenance cycles. If we have a crash (it happens) that damages one of those sliding parts (called lifters in the injection molding trade, although the name is a misnomer) replacing one will change the dimensions of that axle spot only, until the tool is completely re-worked during periodic maintenance.

Dennis Storzek
Accurail, Inc.


Dennis Storzek
 

Hmmm, the groups.io froze and wouldn't allow me to finish the last message. I'm curious about the Bowser axles. If the axles are usable, and the axles are a common diameter, either 3/32 (,09375) or 2 mm (.0787) it should be possible to press the wheels off the axles and press metal wheels on. I'd look for donor wheelsets that are double insulated, because it is considerably easier to press wheels with plastic bushings off and on.

Dennis Storzek


Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Aug 7, 2019 at 07:19 AM, Alexander Schneider Jr wrote:
It should be noted that NMRA RP 24.3, "Axles", specifies only the MAXIMUM length, which is 1.035".
This is true, and I am aware of it. The problem with how the NMRA Standards and R.P.s are written is while they typically give limits, they give absolutely no guidance as to what the preferred length might be. With no guidance and little or no experience in the hobby, the mold designer will typically pick a value close to the specified limit, only allowing a reasonable manufacturing tolerance so as to ensure they don't exceed the limit... such as 1.032 +/- .002" should keep us safe. That totally misses the point that if .990" would have been a better length, then the axles should have been .990.

It's a shame that the gentleman who wants to re-wheel the Bowser cars didn't look into it a couple of years ago, because NWSL used to be able to provide custom length axles for a reasonable extra set-up charge. Now that NWSL is closing, that source is gone.


Alexander Schneider Jr
 

It should be noted that NMRA RP 24.3, "Axles", specifies only the MAXIMUM length, which is 1.035". They also illustrate Type I axles, with the cone ends we commonly see, and Type II with square ends, which I vaguely remember on a Bachmann tender. (Off topic)

 

This document was last revised in 1982. It seems like a proposal to update it would be timely, and something between the two Accurail designs of 1.010" and 1.025” would be a good “preferred” value. Lifelike seems to be the dominant replacement wheel at 1.015”. Given Bowser’s use of the above maximum, and European use of 0.990”, those might be the minimum and maximum values. The revision ought to suggest a maximum value for the difference between the truck and the axle; clearly using 1.015” wheelsets in a Bowser truck doesn’t work very well. The minimum value is, of course, zero.

 

Has anyone measured Central Valley trucks to determine what wheel set would be a good replacement? The need to replacement of wheel sets on those is driven by wheel shape, not getting rid of plastic. I realize there were many different styles and the values may vary, and of course passenger and freight used different wheel sizes.

 

Alex Schneider

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 5:25 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Metal Wheels

 

On Tue, Aug 6, 2019 at 01:33 PM, Denny Anspach wrote:

Probably the most ubiquitous trucks used in the RPM freight car modeling community are the Accurail “Bettendorf".  Their consistent and reliable maximum rollability/minimum end play axle length choices have varied slightly among molding numbers 1-4, the most common being 1.010”, with 1.025” occasionally.  Their superb Andrews trucks benefit consistently with 1.025” axles.  

 

Doc,
I've been finding this whole discussion amusing. The move to shorter axle lengths isn't because of "CAD design" whatever that is, but simply the result of paying attention to the actual prototype dimensions. When Athearn tooled their plastic trucks decades ago, they adopted the 1.035" axle length because that was NMRA recommended practice, and the overall width of the truck came out to whatever it came out to. Red Caboose did something similar years later when they made a truck with the full profile of the journal boxes on the back of the sideframe... only problem was that forced the overall width of the truck to be overly wide, to the point that the journals stick out from under older prototype cars.

When I designed the Accurail truck mold, close to thirty years ago now, I tried to keep the overall width of the trucks to scale... and had all sorts of complaints that the common replacement wheels of the day wouldn't fit, so I jumped through some hoops to squeeze a few more thousandths of depth into the scale size journal boxes. Now I'm seeing  a general trend toward an axle length that would have fit the original design well. I'm sure this is driven by the desire to make the trucks scale width, and that is good, but the width of the trucks is one of those things that NOBODY was thinking of in years past.

Dennis Storzek


Mark Stamm
 

The NMRA practice is what has me in a pickle. I have tons of Bowser H21 hoppers; my primary interest is the PRR. Those plastic wheels have to go and to my knowledge only Reboxx makes replacement sets in the 1.035 length. Any other wheel set I have tried has to much slop side to side.

Mark P Stamm
Mark at Euphoriatt dot Com

Sent from my mobile device


Tony Thompson
 

Dennis Storzek wrote:

The move to shorter axle lengths isn't because of "CAD design" whatever that is, but simply the result of paying attention to the actual prototype dimensions. When Athearn tooled their plastic trucks decades ago, they adopted the 1.035" axle length because that was NMRA recommended practice, and the overall width of the truck came out to whatever it came out to. . .

When I designed the Accurail truck mold, close to thirty years ago now, I tried to keep the overall width of the trucks to scale... and had all sorts of complaints that the common replacement wheels of the day wouldn't fit, so I jumped through some hoops to squeeze a few more thousandths of depth into the scale size journal boxes. Now I'm seeing  a general trend toward an axle length that would have fit the original design well. 

   Thanks for these insights, Dennis. It is certainly evident that newer trucks and wheel sets work with shorter axles.

Tony Thompson




Tony Thompson
 

Denny Anspach wrote:

 I would gently quibble with the assertion that this relatively short (for the US) axle length of 1.002” is the ideal for general replacement, notwithstanding the fact that they may be superb for Tangent’s own trucks, or for other current high end model trucks (the majority of which probably are OK with their own OEM wheel sets). Replacements imply replacements of existing truck wheel sets  of an installed base of model box and passenger cars, the ages of which extend up to a decade or two, or more. 

    This is of course correct. An axle of 1.002-inch length will flop around badly and in fact not roll well in a classic Athearn truck, but is too big for many brass trucks. I would submit that it won't work well in the Accurail Andrews, with its 1.025-inch "best fit" axles, either. Anyone who thinks that ANY chosen wheelset brand fits everything is either inexperienced or cannot tell what rolls well or, perhaps, is not paying attention.

Tony Thompson




Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Denny and List Members,
 
Denny wrote: "they... were available with both wheels insulated"
 
What is the benefit of having both wheels insulated? What exactly makes that a useful thing? Is it perhaps so they can be used in a brass truck and one need not worry about orientation?
 
Hoping for illumination on the subject.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 
 
 

----- Original Message ----- 
Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2019 4:33 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Metal Wheels

David Lehlbach reports that Tangent's HO high quality replacement wheel sets have an axle length of 1.002” , truly good to know.  He also states that it is plainly stated so on their website, which I had previously checked, and repeatedly checked again and could not and am still unable to find (it could be hiding in plain sight, not the first time for me!).  

 I would gently quibble with the assertion that this relatively short (for the US) axle length of 1.002” is the ideal for general replacement, notwithstanding the fact that they may be superb for Tangent’s own trucks, or for other current high end model trucks (the majority of which probably are OK with their own OEM wheel sets). Replacements imply replacements of existing truck wheel sets  of an installed base of model box and passenger cars, the ages of which extend up to a decade or two, or more. 

As some listers may know, I have been interested in ideal wheelset replacement and maximum truck rollability for some years, during which time I have been keenly aware of all the protean variables that affect best choices in each case.  I settled on Reboxx decades ago solely on the available and utility of their incredible variety of 2 mm. axle lengths (that their quality control was extremely high, that they had 0.088” treads and were available with both wheels insulated were welcome but ancillary reasons for choice). 

For my own curiosity, I have kept records of what I have used over the years, using a serendipitously-even-60 currently-saved Reboxx packaging cards to inform and plot continued usage (720 wheel sets by my count). The choices were all made by measurement on a Rolltester, results attenuated subjectively to minimum axle end-play (i.e., a given truck with too-short axles might precipitously roll off a dead-level surface just by looking at it, but nosing and wobbling side to side when doing so sufficient to presage common routine coupling and height alignment problems, not at all looking good in the process!).  I have not included all the IM, Kadee, and Branchline wheel sets also installed additionally).  

Probably the most ubiquitous trucks used in the RPM freight car modeling community are the Accurail “Bettendorf".  Their consistent and reliable maximum rollability/minimum end play axle length choices have varied slightly among molding numbers 1-4, the most common being 1.010”, with 1.025” occasionally.  Their superb Andrews trucks benefit consistently with 1.025” axles.  

As might be expected there is a rough bell shaped curve of usage with axle lengths of l.015” and 1.020”  at the apex with 1.010” and 1.025” on steep downslopes.   There are slightly more 1.030” axles than 1.005”, and almost no 1.000”.  With European and a variety of brass trucks, 0.990” and below to 0.050” have considerable utility, especially the European standard of 0.970”.   I still have in hand a broad Reboxx inventory, and a cursory inspection this morning shows that my packs of 1.000” axles have barely been dipped into. 

Tim O’C opines that trucks roll differently under load than simply light on-test.  Only to a very limited degree, I have found this to be true (I fashioned a lump of lead to mount on a single truck to roughly replicate a half-NMRA weight).  Some dramatically increased rollability under load, notable the old Lindbergs; while only a few others really bogged down.  The overwhelming number demonstrated not a scintilla of difference. Lubrication was only a rare help (confirming once again the late Linn Westcott’s  good advice of many decades ago).

Dave Parker reports that the IM website currently records axle length for its wheels, which it indeed does.  Parker reports a length of 1.060” (WOW!). while the website itself reports 1.006”, consonant with my own measurements, and a definite change from their long held standard axle length of 1.012”.  This de facto chang coincided with a reported change in China contractors, but was not publicly reported until Brian Leppart rung the bell. 

I think that one can judge from this recorded data what axle lengths will best suit her/his fleet, but if only one mass market length was to be chosen, the most bang for the buck would be wheel sets with axle lengths in the 1.010”-1.015” range, with extension to 1.020” as well.

BTW, my recorded bell shaped curve of my actual range of useful  axle lengths reportedly has closely tracked Reboxx’s own sales spread. 

Respectfully,

Denny
  
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864




Dennis Storzek
 

On Tue, Aug 6, 2019 at 01:33 PM, Denny Anspach wrote:
Probably the most ubiquitous trucks used in the RPM freight car modeling community are the Accurail “Bettendorf".  Their consistent and reliable maximum rollability/minimum end play axle length choices have varied slightly among molding numbers 1-4, the most common being 1.010”, with 1.025” occasionally.  Their superb Andrews trucks benefit consistently with 1.025” axles.  
 
Doc,
I've been finding this whole discussion amusing. The move to shorter axle lengths isn't because of "CAD design" whatever that is, but simply the result of paying attention to the actual prototype dimensions. When Athearn tooled their plastic trucks decades ago, they adopted the 1.035" axle length because that was NMRA recommended practice, and the overall width of the truck came out to whatever it came out to. Red Caboose did something similar years later when they made a truck with the full profile of the journal boxes on the back of the sideframe... only problem was that forced the overall width of the truck to be overly wide, to the point that the journals stick out from under older prototype cars.

When I designed the Accurail truck mold, close to thirty years ago now, I tried to keep the overall width of the trucks to scale... and had all sorts of complaints that the common replacement wheels of the day wouldn't fit, so I jumped through some hoops to squeeze a few more thousandths of depth into the scale size journal boxes. Now I'm seeing  a general trend toward an axle length that would have fit the original design well. I'm sure this is driven by the desire to make the trucks scale width, and that is good, but the width of the trucks is one of those things that NOBODY was thinking of in years past.

Dennis Storzek


Tom Madden
 

On Tue, Aug 6, 2019 at 02:33 PM, Denny Anspach wrote:
David Lehlbach reports that Tangent's HO high quality replacement wheel sets have an axle length of 1.002” , truly good to know.  He also states that it is plainly stated so on their website, which I had previously checked, and repeatedly checked again and could not and am still unable to find (it could be hiding in plain sight, not the first time for me!).  
 
The page that David's link leads to https://www.tangentscalemodels.com/product-category/wheelsets/
doesn't show the axle length. But if you click on any of the wheelset products at the bottom of the page, then you'll get to pages that show axle length.

Tom Madden


Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

David Lehlbach reports that Tangent's HO high quality replacement wheel sets have an axle length of 1.002” , truly good to know.  He also states that it is plainly stated so on their website, which I had previously checked, and repeatedly checked again and could not and am still unable to find (it could be hiding in plain sight, not the first time for me!).  

 I would gently quibble with the assertion that this relatively short (for the US) axle length of 1.002” is the ideal for general replacement, notwithstanding the fact that they may be superb for Tangent’s own trucks, or for other current high end model trucks (the majority of which probably are OK with their own OEM wheel sets). Replacements imply replacements of existing truck wheel sets  of an installed base of model box and passenger cars, the ages of which extend up to a decade or two, or more. 

As some listers may know, I have been interested in ideal wheelset replacement and maximum truck rollability for some years, during which time I have been keenly aware of all the protean variables that affect best choices in each case.  I settled on Reboxx decades ago solely on the available and utility of their incredible variety of 2 mm. axle lengths (that their quality control was extremely high, that they had 0.088” treads and were available with both wheels insulated were welcome but ancillary reasons for choice). 

For my own curiosity, I have kept records of what I have used over the years, using a serendipitously-even-60 currently-saved Reboxx packaging cards to inform and plot continued usage (720 wheel sets by my count). The choices were all made by measurement on a Rolltester, results attenuated subjectively to minimum axle end-play (i.e., a given truck with too-short axles might precipitously roll off a dead-level surface just by looking at it, but nosing and wobbling side to side when doing so sufficient to presage common routine coupling and height alignment problems, not at all looking good in the process!).  I have not included all the IM, Kadee, and Branchline wheel sets also installed additionally).  

Probably the most ubiquitous trucks used in the RPM freight car modeling community are the Accurail “Bettendorf".  Their consistent and reliable maximum rollability/minimum end play axle length choices have varied slightly among molding numbers 1-4, the most common being 1.010”, with 1.025” occasionally.  Their superb Andrews trucks benefit consistently with 1.025” axles.  

As might be expected there is a rough bell shaped curve of usage with axle lengths of l.015” and 1.020”  at the apex with 1.010” and 1.025” on steep downslopes.   There are slightly more 1.030” axles than 1.005”, and almost no 1.000”.  With European and a variety of brass trucks, 0.990” and below to 0.050” have considerable utility, especially the European standard of 0.970”.   I still have in hand a broad Reboxx inventory, and a cursory inspection this morning shows that my packs of 1.000” axles have barely been dipped into. 

Tim O’C opines that trucks roll differently under load than simply light on-test.  Only to a very limited degree, I have found this to be true (I fashioned a lump of lead to mount on a single truck to roughly replicate a half-NMRA weight).  Some dramatically increased rollability under load, notable the old Lindbergs; while only a few others really bogged down.  The overwhelming number demonstrated not a scintilla of difference. Lubrication was only a rare help (confirming once again the late Linn Westcott’s  good advice of many decades ago).

Dave Parker reports that the IM website currently records axle length for its wheels, which it indeed does.  Parker reports a length of 1.060” (WOW!). while the website itself reports 1.006”, consonant with my own measurements, and a definite change from their long held standard axle length of 1.012”.  This de facto chang coincided with a reported change in China contractors, but was not publicly reported until Brian Leppart rung the bell. 

I think that one can judge from this recorded data what axle lengths will best suit her/his fleet, but if only one mass market length was to be chosen, the most bang for the buck would be wheel sets with axle lengths in the 1.010”-1.015” range, with extension to 1.020” as well.

BTW, my recorded bell shaped curve of my actual range of useful  axle lengths reportedly has closely tracked Reboxx’s own sales spread. 

Respectfully,

Denny
  
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864




Schleigh Mike
 

More points on this topic----

It was mentioned earlier that the 'truing' tool for dressing up the axle pockets in the backs of side frames is useful.  And it is.  It is also vital for finishing several of the cast-brass and other metal truck kits that have been available over the years.  A sub-set of these might be considered the brass trucks on imported cars and tenders.  Some of these can be vastly improved carefully using this tool.  Further, the many axle lengths offered by ReBox have been absolutely the saving finish to these efforts.  Let us hope these various wheel sets remain available.

One other point:  Using an axle that is too short in the fixed dimension between the respective journals has the tendency to lower the car sitting above.  If replacing the functioning axle, measure it and use something equal or close.  If you choose one too long, the truck will not roll well.  Again, the ReBox choices are VERY helpful.

Regards--Mike Schleigh  Grove City, Penna.

On Monday, August 5, 2019, 9:21:52 PM EDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



The Kato ASF trucks David mentions take .950 Reboxx replacement axles. The trucks
roll far better with the Reboxx axles too - with a car on top of them! The Reboxx
"roll tester" tested only UNLOADED trucks. Performance can be very different under
a load. The Kato ASF trucks with factory wheel sets under load did not dazzle. The
Tahoe ASF 70-ton trucks under a load are dazzling.

Some Atlas trucks have very short axles too.

The larger Reboxx sizes were for the TENS OF MILLIONS of Athearn sideframes out there. :-)

Tim O'Connor



On 8/5/2019 6:37 PM, Tangent Scale Models via Groups.Io wrote:

Denny S. Anspach, MD wrote:

"I note that neither Tangent and Rapido (nor Intermountain for that matter) publish axle dimensions, so one has no idea -none, nada, zip- whether they are 0.990” or 1.020”, a vast difference that commonly presages vast and critical differences in expected or desired performance..."

Denny, as has been stated on this list in the past, Tangent Scale Models does indeed disclose the axle lengths for our wheels on our website and has since 2008 when we first offered our fine wheels for sale.  Click on any one of the links for the wheels here and the axle length is disclosed: https://www.tangentscalemodels.com/product-category/wheelsets/

As you will see, the Tangent 33" wheels have a 1.002" length which is a highly useful length for most normal applications beyond those found in Tangent trucks.  We appreciate the kind comments on this list in recent days about our wheelsets.  The "oddball" lengths that require Reboxx have really fallen by the wayside in recent years due to more consistent, modern CAD-based truck designs found on today's trucks.  Today's trucks generally look and operate better than the trucks that the Reboxx line was designed for, meaning you can get significant mileage from the replacement weelsets from brands like Tangent, especially with the opportunity to purchase 100-count packages.

Best wishes,

David Lehlbach
Tangent Scale Models (who recently used Reboxx wheels in KATO trucks on a personal model, which have a very different standard but which also date from the 1990s)

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


leakinmywaders
 

To tie up a loose end per the earlier mention of Tahoe Model Works trucks, according to their maker they were tooled for and as a rule have been supplied with InterMountain Ry wheel sets. 

Chris Frissell
Polson, MT