Topics

Paint Damage from Bubble Wrap

Brian Termunde
 

Good day;
I seem to recall a fairly recent thread about paint damage to steam era freight cars caused by bubble wrap. I did try to do a search for "Bubblewrap", "Bubble Wrap" and "Damage" But didn't find what I was looking for.

Does anyone recall this thread (It might have been on another group, but I was sure it was here), or have any suggestions as how to remove the residue?

I received a car that I purchased on fleabay, and it had been wrapped up in bubble wrap with the bubbles facing car, now I have large blotches (especially in N Scale!) all over the car. I tried washing it in soap and water to no avail.

Thanks in advance!


Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah

Ken Vandevoort
 

No experience witht bubble wrap, but I know that shelf liner will also damage paint.  Found out the hard way.

Ken Vandevoort

Robert kirkham
 

I think the thread was on the passenger car list.  It came up once; a few weeks or months later I returned to it after finding some damaged cars.  My only strategy so far is to sit the cars in the air, and hope the bubble wrap elixir evaporates or something.  If that doesn’t work, the cars will need to be weathered or repainted to hide the checkerboard pattern dots of damage.

 

Rob Kirkham

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Termunde via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, August 17, 2019 8:06 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Paint Damage from Bubble Wrap

 

Good day;
I seem to recall a fairly recent thread about paint damage to steam era freight cars caused by bubble wrap. I did try to do a search for "Bubblewrap", "Bubble Wrap" and "Damage" But didn't find what I was looking for.

Does anyone recall this thread (It might have been on another group, but I was sure it was here), or have any suggestions as how to remove the residue?

I received a car that I purchased on fleabay, and it had been wrapped up in bubble wrap with the bubbles facing car, now I have large blotches (especially in N Scale!) all over the car. I tried washing it in soap and water to no avail.

Thanks in advance!

Take Care,

 

Brian R. Termunde

Midvale, Utah

Edward
 

Its best to use acid free tissue paper as the first wrapper for a model, before using bubble wrap or sheet foam for cushioning.
Well worth its additional cost.
Ed Bommer

Dennis Storzek
 

The problem is the plasticizer that keeps the bubble wrap pliable is migrating out. This is similar to the fog that used to develop in new automobile windows as the plasticizer migrated out of the vinyl dash board. The automakers solved that problem, but it's still a problem with cheap made-in-China bubble wrap, but who can tell where any of this stuff comes from these days.   

I recently unpacked a Chicom battery radio someone had given me a few years ago; same problem. 99% isopropyl alcohol, which I use at work, took it off with some wiping, but will also remove some paints and pad printing inks, so be careful. I would try a wash in warm water and dish soap, if that doesn't work, try wiping with 70% drugstore isopropyl alcohol, and if that doesn't work, the higher concentration alcohol. If it strips the paint, you've a good start on repainting.

Dennis Storzek 

Tony Thompson
 

Personally, I use the Hendrickson method: place model in plastic sandwich bag, wrap loosely with paper towel, about two layers or so. No abrasion and minimal mechanical damage.
Tony Thompson 


On Aug 17, 2019, at 9:46 AM, Edward <edb8391@...> wrote:

Its best to use acid free tissue paper as the first wrapper for a model, before using bubble wrap or sheet foam for cushioning.
Well worth its additional cost.
Ed Bommer

Denny Anspach
 

The routine processing method that the California State Railroad Museum uses with its vast collection of toy and scale model railroad models is to wrap them first in Tyvek, a synthetic neutral paper of recognized archival quality. This replaces all other wraps, e.g. bubble, tissue, saran, etc. I personally use the high grade cut plastic sheet wraps from Reboxx (no longer available) from a dwindling inventory. They have the great advantage that I can identify directly what is inside the wrap.

I believe that all of the plastic wraps that are currently packed with about everything that arrives in this mail order economy should be considered suspect. One can safely presume that no one on the other end is or has had the least concern in this regard about single use products usually heading directly to the landfill.

Tony’s comment on Richard Hendrickson’s use of baggies or Ziplocks has validity inasmuch as at least the interiors of these food grade plastic bags are reportedly completely free of the destructive plasticizer contaminants mentioned by Dennis (as to Dennis’ report that the auto manufacturers have solved the windshield problems caused by the outgassing of the vinyl dashboard coverings, I can directly report that at least on my pretty new cars, they still have….not).

Presumably, Saran and similar food grade wraps also would lack placticizers.

Denny


Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA

Tim O'Connor
 


And then there's
TYVEK - lint free, pH neutral, tear resistant, water resistant,
won't mar or scratch or interact with paint. Only available in rolls from Uline
but a single roll is good for hundreds of freight car models.

https://www.uline.com/BL_1969/Tyvek-Rolls

If you've bought any RTR models from China from Athearn or others, then you've
probably noticed that weird, soft material that protects the models in their packages.

Tim O'Connor

===============================

On 8/17/2019 8:03 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Personally, I use the Hendrickson method: place model in plastic sandwich bag, wrap loosely with paper towel, about two layers or so. No abrasion and minimal mechanical damage.
Tony Thompson 


On Aug 17, 2019, at 9:46 AM, Edward <edb8391@...> wrote:

Its best to use acid free tissue paper as the first wrapper for a model, before using bubble wrap or sheet foam for cushioning.
Well worth its additional cost.
Ed Bommer


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Benjamin Hom
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"And then there's TYVEK - lint free, pH neutral, tear resistant, water resistant,
won't mar or scratch or interact with paint. Only available in rolls from Uline
but a single roll is good for hundreds of freight car models."

There's a free supply of Tyvek at the Post Office in the form of the large Priority Mail and Express Mail envelopes.


Ben Hom

C J Wyatt
 

Free? only if you are using them to send something via Priority Mail or Express Mail. Otherwise you may be committing a Federal offense.

Jack Wyatt

On Sunday, August 18, 2019, 01:49:33 PM EDT, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:


Tim O'Connor wrote:
"And then there's TYVEK - lint free, pH neutral, tear resistant, water resistant,
won't mar or scratch or interact with paint. Only available in rolls from Uline
but a single roll is good for hundreds of freight car models."

There's a free supply of Tyvek at the Post Office in the form of the large Priority Mail and Express Mail envelopes.


Ben Hom

Tim O'Connor
 


Thicknessness and properties of the material vary. I'm still looking for a source
for the "soft" Tyvek material like the sheets packed with models from China. You can
write on Tyvek too, which mitigates the opacity problem.

Like Denny, I bought a package of the Reboxx model wrappers years ago - great stuff.
But it won't last much longer.

Tim



On 8/18/2019 1:49 PM, Benjamin Hom wrote:
Tim O'Connor wrote:
"And then there's TYVEK - lint free, pH neutral, tear resistant, water resistant,
won't mar or scratch or interact with paint. Only available in rolls from Uline
but a single roll is good for hundreds of freight car models."

There's a free supply of Tyvek at the Post Office in the form of the large Priority Mail and Express Mail envelopes.


Ben Hom


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Andy Carlson
 

I have a 26 ft x 5 ft train work room. I made the ceiling with stretched Tyvek from a lumber yard. I have 4 LED shop lights above the ceiling and the Tyvek allows ample diffused light to pass through. I am quite pleased!
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Sunday, August 18, 2019, 11:01:34 AM PDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



Thicknessness and properties of the material vary. I'm still looking for a source
for the "soft" Tyvek material like the sheets packed with models from China. You can
write on Tyvek too, which mitigates the opacity problem.

Like Denny, I bought a package of the Reboxx model wrappers years ago - great stuff.
But it won't last much longer.

Tim



On 8/18/2019 1:49 PM, Benjamin Hom wrote:

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"And then there's TYVEK - lint free, pH neutral, tear resistant, water resistant,
won't mar or scratch or interact with paint. Only available in rolls from Uline
but a single roll is good for hundreds of freight car models."

There's a free supply of Tyvek at the Post Office in the form of the large Priority Mail and Express Mail envelopes.


Ben Hom


_._,_._,_

Rod Miller
 

On 8/18/19 11:01 AM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
Thicknessness and properties of the material vary. I'm still looking for a source
for the "soft" Tyvek material like the sheets packed with models from China. You can
write on Tyvek too, which mitigates the opacity problem.
Like Denny, I bought a package of the Reboxx model wrappers years ago - great stuff.
But it won't last much longer.
Tim
On 8/18/2019 1:49 PM, Benjamin Hom wrote:
Tim O'Connor wrote:
"And then there's TYVEK - lint free, pH neutral, tear resistant, water resistant,
won't mar or scratch or interact with paint. Only available in rolls from Uline
but a single roll is good for hundreds of freight car models."

There's a free supply of Tyvek at the Post Office in the form of the large Priority Mail and Express Mail envelopes.


Ben Hom
--
/*Tim O'Connor*/
/*Sterling, Massachusetts*/
The USPS has enough problems without modelers scooping
up all its Tyvek envelopes. You don't have to buy a full
roll of Tyvek. ebay sellers sell it by the foot. Another
option is to watch homes under construction. Here in CA
the exterior at some point gets wrapped in Tyvek - I'm
sure the builder would give you some.

--
Rod Miller
Handcraftsman
===
Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives,
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More
http://www.rodmiller.com

Ken Vandevoort
 

Is the Tyvek the same as the Tyvek housewrap you can find at Lowe's and other places?
Ken Vandevoort

Tim O'Connor
 


Tyvek is a whole technology, not just one material - If you read the descriptions of
the products they use different "substrates" - some are like stiff paper, some is rigid
for use for containers, and some is soft. You can even get it custom printed - imagine the
backdrop for your layout on a single printed background roll 150 feet long... ;-)

Tim O'


On 8/18/2019 6:06 PM, Ken Vandevoort via Groups.Io wrote:
Is the Tyvek the same as the Tyvek housewrap you can find at Lowe's and other places?
Ken Vandevoort

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Dennis Storzek
 

On Sun, Aug 18, 2019 at 05:02 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
You can even get it custom printed - imagine the
backdrop for your layout on a single printed background roll 150 feet long... ;-)
Imagine the printing rubbing off on your models, because the printed product is intended to be buried in a house wall rather than wrap models.

Dennis Storzek

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

One SHOULD buy them. After all, the Post Office is supposed to be self-sustaining, and losses mean postal rate increases, even if not an offense. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Aug 18, 2019, at 12:57 PM, C J Wyatt <cjwyatt@...> wrote:

Free? only if you are using them to send something via Priority Mail or Express Mail. Otherwise you may be committing a Federal offense.

Jack Wyatt

On Sunday, August 18, 2019, 01:49:33 PM EDT, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:


Tim O'Connor wrote:
"And then there's TYVEK - lint free, pH neutral, tear resistant, water resistant,
won't mar or scratch or interact with paint. Only available in rolls from Uline
but a single roll is good for hundreds of freight car models."

There's a free supply of Tyvek at the Post Office in the form of the large Priority Mail and Express Mail envelopes.


Ben Hom

Charles Peck
 

If one just really wants a small quantity of the soft variety, one could buy one of the tyvek suits.  That should be enough to wrap a significant number of models.
Chuck Peck

On Sun, Aug 18, 2019 at 11:10 PM BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...> wrote:
One SHOULD buy them. After all, the Post Office is supposed to be self-sustaining, and losses mean postal rate increases, even if not an offense. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Aug 18, 2019, at 12:57 PM, C J Wyatt <cjwyatt@...> wrote:

Free? only if you are using them to send something via Priority Mail or Express Mail. Otherwise you may be committing a Federal offense.

Jack Wyatt

On Sunday, August 18, 2019, 01:49:33 PM EDT, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:


Tim O'Connor wrote:
"And then there's TYVEK - lint free, pH neutral, tear resistant, water resistant,
won't mar or scratch or interact with paint. Only available in rolls from Uline
but a single roll is good for hundreds of freight car models."

There's a free supply of Tyvek at the Post Office in the form of the large Priority Mail and Express Mail envelopes.


Ben Hom

Paul Deis
 

Years ago I was told to use the plastic bag that your dry cleaning comes home in. I have used that for models. One bag will wrap a lot of pieces. I just took some trains out of storage that were wrapped 14 years ago and the plastic did not effect the paint at all. The models were a mixture of painted and unpainted brass and plastic rolling stock from a variety of companies.

Paul Deis
Modeling the SP in 1949

mopacfirst
 

I use the Axian storage boxes, first when I took every car off the layout several years ago when the floors were being re-done, second as I move inter-state where I have a lot of car storage boxes stacked in my other house.  In the first instance, where some cars stayed in the boxes for a year or more, the only models I had any real problem with were the Branchline.  Any cars that weren't weathered or Dullcoated stuck to the foam to the extent that I ripped the doors off of quite a few boxcars on one or both sides, and sometimes the car stuck to the top side foam strongly enough to hold it.

I know from working with the Branchline paint that it sometimes stays slightly tacky even after a number of years.  So my solution is to use sheet foam intended for packing dishes, which I lay into the bottom of the box and then lay over the cars, in any box that has Branchline cars.  For my purposes, that's good enough, since when these cars get unpacked, I'll go through a program of replacing the original coupler pockets with Kadee 262 anyway, along with painting wheel faces and anything else that I didn't do when I was originally building all these the first time, including a few more reweighs.

On a related note, the replacing of the draft gear involves drilling a new hole, tapped 2-56, between the existing two mounting holes for the OEM coupler pocket.  I've found a sweet spot for this hole, just far enough outboard of the inner original mounting hole to clear it by about 1/16".  This is far enough toward the end of the car to avoid biting into that mounting hole, and far enough forward to avoid hitting the steel nut weights that came with the kits.  As a compulsive OCD kit assembler, I always tried to position that nut so that a flat was toward the end of the car, which helps now in the modification.

You can determine this position by eye by laying the 262 draft gear against the floor of the car, with the reinforcement around the draft gear opening flush against the car end, and marking the center with a couple of turns of a small drill bit.  Once you've done that, you can verify that the hole is centered transverse to the car centerline and in the right position with respect to the existing holes before final drilling.

Ron Merrick