Topics

Removing mold from a railroad print

O Fenton Wells
 

This is kinda off topic but I have a railroad print that I forgot I had and after 6 or 7 moves I found it in a tube and it has some light brown mold on it.  Does anoyoone know how to remove the mold without hurting the print.
I hope the jail cell is warm and the food is good
Fenton Wells

Bob Miller
 

Check with an art museum or art dealer and ask about folks who clean and conserve old paintings,etc.


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...>
Sent: Monday, August 26, 2019 4:37:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Removing mold from a railroad print
 
This is kinda off topic but I have a railroad print that I forgot I had and after 6 or 7 moves I found it in a tube and it has some light brown mold on it.  Does anoyoone know how to remove the mold without hurting the print.
I hope the jail cell is warm and the food is good
Fenton Wells

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I agree with Bob.  That’s a job for professionals, or at least, professional advice.

 

I presume, Fenton, that the photo depicts a steam era freight car, at least?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Miller
Sent: Monday, August 26, 2019 5:55 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Removing mold from a railroad print

 

Check with an art museum or art dealer and ask about folks who clean and conserve old paintings,etc.

 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...>
Sent: Monday, August 26, 2019 4:37:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Removing mold from a railroad print

 

This is kinda off topic but I have a railroad print that I forgot I had and after 6 or 7 moves I found it in a tube and it has some light brown mold on it.  Does anoyoone know how to remove the mold without hurting the print.
I hope the jail cell is warm and the food is good
Fenton Wells

Michael Gross
 

The American Institute for Conservation https://www.culturalheritage.org may be able to help you find a paper conservator in your area.  Naturally, there is some cost involved, and you will have to weigh the cost of conservation with the value of the print itself.  I.e., is it "worth saving?"

Many conservators have sub specialties:  works on canvas, works on paper, etc.

Good luck!

Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA

Jon Miller
 

On 8/26/2019 2:55 PM, Bob Miller wrote:
Check with an art museum or art dealer and ask about folks who clean and conserve old paintings,etc.

    If it costs too much you might try a Q tip and water or soap and water.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

Tim O'Connor
 

I like Jon's idea

Real photo paper is pretty water resistant. I would add a tiny drop of
ammonia to the Q tip + water to kill the bacteria. but i'd test it first.



On 8/27/2019 1:11 PM, Jon Miller wrote:
On 8/26/2019 2:55 PM, Bob Miller wrote:
Check with an art museum or art dealer and ask about folks who clean and conserve old paintings,etc.

    If it costs too much you might try a Q tip and water or soap and water.

-- 
Jon Miller


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

O Fenton Wells
 

Looks like I was wrong and it is not mildew but an acid from the tube that it was stored in.  It's brown.  The freezer and drying it didn't budge it.  NOt sure it's worth going too much farther.
Anyone know a good source for Howard Fogg railroad prints?
Fenton

On Tue, Aug 27, 2019 at 3:24 PM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
I like Jon's idea

Real photo paper is pretty water resistant. I would add a tiny drop of
ammonia to the Q tip + water to kill the bacteria. but i'd test it first.



On 8/27/2019 1:11 PM, Jon Miller wrote:

On 8/26/2019 2:55 PM, Bob Miller wrote:
Check with an art museum or art dealer and ask about folks who clean and conserve old paintings,etc.

    If it costs too much you might try a Q tip and water or soap and water.

-- 
Jon Miller


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...

Benjamin Hom
 

Fenton Wells asked:
"Looks like I was wrong and it is not mildew but an acid from the tube that it was stored in.  It's brown.  The freezer and drying it didn't budge it.  Not sure it's worth going too much farther.
Anyone know a good source for Howard Fogg railroad prints?"

Time to step back and answer a few questions:

1. Is this a numbered and signed print?  If it's a low numbered, signed print of a popular subject, it might be worth investigatigating restoration.

2. If it isn't numbered and signed, you might be able to get another copy at a reasonable price.  Check eBay to get an idea of the market - a search on "Howard Fogg" returned 310 hits.


Ben Hom
   

spsalso
 

The brown "stain" on a print can also come from inadequate rinsing during processing.  The pattern of the area would likely reveal whether it's that or acid from the tube.

As far as removing mold from prints:

I have been happy with using 99% isopropyl alcohol on FILM.  I soak a micro-fiber cloth in the alcohol, and rub the film well.  Then I rinse using alcohol from a wash bottle.  Let dry.

Because it has worked so well on negatives (and slides), I'd try using it on prints.  But testing carefully, at first--perhaps on a border.


Ed

Edward Sutorik

RICH CHAPIN
 

try this link from the Smithsonian

https://siarchives.si.edu/.../collections-care-guidelines-resources/ive-got-mold-my-files

I found it by goggling how do I remove mold from old paper

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Hi Fenton.

 

There is a process called “de-acidification.”  As many of you know, the “Official Guide” book were printed on flimsy paper which was also acid-rich, and as a consequence become extremely fragile.  I have an Official Guide from 1948, when I was born, and was interested in preserving it.  The conservator I consulted told me about this process, which in that case involved inserting a thin deacidifying paper between every two pages – at some significant expense.  As a result, my OG continues to deteriorate.

 

But with a single print, it might not be too terribly expensive. The questions asked about whether it’s a signed original print vs a reproduction are considerations for sure.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of O Fenton Wells
Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2019 3:38 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Removing mold from a railroad print

 

Looks like I was wrong and it is not mildew but an acid from the tube that it was stored in.  It's brown.  The freezer and drying it didn't budge it.  NOt sure it's worth going too much farther.

Anyone know a good source for Howard Fogg railroad prints?

Fenton

 

On Tue, Aug 27, 2019 at 3:24 PM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

I like Jon's idea

Real photo paper is pretty water resistant. I would add a tiny drop of
ammonia to the Q tip + water to kill the bacteria. but i'd test it first.



On 8/27/2019 1:11 PM, Jon Miller wrote:

On 8/26/2019 2:55 PM, Bob Miller wrote:

Check with an art museum or art dealer and ask about folks who clean and conserve old paintings,etc.

    If it costs too much you might try a Q tip and water or soap and water.

-- 
Jon Miller

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


 

--

Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd

Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...

O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks Schuyler, I'll try to find some.  I tried the alcohol and peroxide on a que tip and nothing.  I'm very disappointed but it is a print and I may try to find a new one.  If available and affordable.  In the mean time I may go try the alcohol again but, this time in a glass over ice.
Fenton
PS if anyone knows a good source of Howard Fogg prints, let me know.


On Tue, Aug 27, 2019 at 4:10 PM Schuyler Larrabee via Groups.Io <schuyler.larrabee=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Hi Fenton.

 

There is a process called “de-acidification.”  As many of you know, the “Official Guide” book were printed on flimsy paper which was also acid-rich, and as a consequence become extremely fragile.  I have an Official Guide from 1948, when I was born, and was interested in preserving it.  The conservator I consulted told me about this process, which in that case involved inserting a thin deacidifying paper between every two pages – at some significant expense.  As a result, my OG continues to deteriorate.

 

But with a single print, it might not be too terribly expensive. The questions asked about whether it’s a signed original print vs a reproduction are considerations for sure.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of O Fenton Wells
Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2019 3:38 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Removing mold from a railroad print

 

Looks like I was wrong and it is not mildew but an acid from the tube that it was stored in.  It's brown.  The freezer and drying it didn't budge it.  NOt sure it's worth going too much farther.

Anyone know a good source for Howard Fogg railroad prints?

Fenton

 

On Tue, Aug 27, 2019 at 3:24 PM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

I like Jon's idea

Real photo paper is pretty water resistant. I would add a tiny drop of
ammonia to the Q tip + water to kill the bacteria. but i'd test it first.



On 8/27/2019 1:11 PM, Jon Miller wrote:

On 8/26/2019 2:55 PM, Bob Miller wrote:

Check with an art museum or art dealer and ask about folks who clean and conserve old paintings,etc.

    If it costs too much you might try a Q tip and water or soap and water.

-- 
Jon Miller

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


 

--

Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd

Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...

James SANDIFER
 

In photo printing, the print is exposed, then goes into a developer, then to a fixer (which stops the development process), then a water wash for 4-5 minutes. If one wants the print to have a gloss, he uses glossy paper and dries the print face down on a high gloss heated drum. If it is matte finish, it still must be dried, preferably on a heated drum, to keep it flat. 

So, water should not hurt it, but care should be taken with the softened emulsion or you can rub it off of the paper backing. Drying it perfectly flat may be a greater issue.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2019 2:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Removing mold from a railroad print

 

I like Jon's idea

Real photo paper is pretty water resistant. I would add a tiny drop of
ammonia to the Q tip + water to kill the bacteria. but i'd test it first.



On 8/27/2019 1:11 PM, Jon Miller wrote:

On 8/26/2019 2:55 PM, Bob Miller wrote:

Check with an art museum or art dealer and ask about folks who clean and conserve old paintings,etc.

    If it costs too much you might try a Q tip and water or soap and water.

-- 
Jon Miller

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts