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New early P&R steel gondola model


Eric Hansmann
 

A new HO scale model is available for those focused on early 20th Century modeling. A Philadelphia & Reading GAc class steel gondola with drop doors is available as a 3D print through Shapeways. Bob McGlone offers decals and a coal load to finish the models. Details are in the latest post on my blog.



Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Eric,

An interesting model. Can you tell us how long they lasted in service? Were any sold off to other roads? Did any go into MW service or other uses?

Yours Aye,

Mungo Napier, Laird of Mallard Lodge  🦆


On Wed, Dec 18, 2019 at 7:03 AM Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:
A new HO scale model is available for those focused on early 20th Century modeling. A Philadelphia & Reading GAc class steel gondola with drop doors is available as a 3D print through Shapeways. Bob McGlone offers decals and a coal load to finish the models. Details are in the latest post on my blog.



Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


Tony Thompson
 


Garth Groff wrote:

An interesting model. Can you tell us how long they lasted in service? Were any sold off to other roads? Did any go into MW service or other uses?

    Like many of the very earliest steel gondolas, this car lacks a substantial top chord as well as a side sill. I would guess they readily buckled if overloaded, as did many of these early cars.

Tony Thompson




Dave Parker
 

Garth:

It looks like the P&R 24000 series was renumbered to 26001-27499 in 1926, coincident with the change from P&R to RDG.  There were still 1493 cars in 1926, 1491 in 1930, and 950 in 1935.  I cannot find them in my January, 1938, register.

Hope this helps.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Eric Hansmann
 

I’ve posted Eric Neubauer’s comments from the Early Rail list after my signature. He added quite a bit of history.

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

A couple of comments: This isn’t a particularly large car for having 50-ton trucks, so it wasn’t designed specifically for coal. The dimensions suggest it could be used as an alternative for the HS, HP, and HK classes serving  collieries that couldn’t handle higher cars. The P&R did handle a large amount of iron ore and mill products which could take better advantage of the 50-ton trucks. Maybe the intent was to create a multi-purpose car which could be loaded to and from the iron furnaces and steel mills. Actually, an article in the 1/18/01 Railroad Gazette confirms this. It would also provide a reasonable explanation for any cars moving far from home.

 

Rebuilding the entire fleet into P&R 26001-27499 GAd class took place from 8-09 through 8-17, so they didn’t last long as built. Coincidently, Pressed Steel Car offered a fairly popular side-sill less version of their fish-belly hopper car design, and the P&R had a thousand of them. They were rebodied in the mid-teens. At that time they would have been 15 years old and due for rebuilding.

 

The P&R design was Cambria Steel’s first major venture into car building and P&R was the primary purchaser. CRRofNJ 38500-35999 (later 88000-88499) might have been a somewhat similar 40-ton version, but I can’t recall ever seeing a photo to confirm. The details of CB&Q 81000-81999 Caswell dump cars built by Cambria in 1903 are also similar to P&R GAc. Cornwall & Lebanon 1100-1199 built 1905 and 1907 had identical overall dimensions and likely used for iron ore. These were absorbed into the PRR fleet.

 

Cambria Steel was eventually acquired by Bethlehem Steel, and car building at Johnstown, PA ended in about 2008. By that time, the parent company had become Johnstown America, then Freight Car America.

 

I don’t quite understand the corrugated appearance inside the sides of the model. As far as I know, this class had no lining. Nice model anyway. I scratch built one of these out of Plastruct once. It didn’t have rivets. A solid lead center sill seemed to be the only way to hide the weight.

 

Eric Neubauer

BFE, Central Texas

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2019 2:45 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] New early P&R steel gondola model

 

Eric,

 

An interesting model. Can you tell us how long they lasted in service? Were any sold off to other roads? Did any go into MW service or other uses?


Yours Aye,

Mungo Napier, Laird of Mallard Lodge  🦆

 

 

On Wed, Dec 18, 2019 at 7:03 AM Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

A new HO scale model is available for those focused on early 20th Century modeling. A Philadelphia & Reading GAc class steel gondola with drop doors is available as a 3D print through Shapeways. Bob McGlone offers decals and a coal load to finish the models. Details are in the latest post on my blog.

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


Tom Madden
 

On Wed, Dec 18, 2019 at 02:54 PM, Eric Hansmann wrote:

I’ve posted Eric Neubauer’s comments from the Early Rail list after my signature. He added quite a bit of history.

 

<snip>

 

I don’t quite understand the corrugated appearance inside the sides of the model. As far as I know, this class had no lining. [Eric N.]


I've put together an explanation of why the "corrugations" are present and how 3D printing of highly detailed vertical surfaces is still problematical. (Sort of a warm-up for my Cocoa Beach clinic.) Since Eric posts to multiple forums I put everything in a pdf document on my web site:
http://www.pullmanproject.com/Gondola.pdf

Tom Madden

 


Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, Dec 19, 2019 at 11:43 AM, Tom Madden wrote:
I've put together an explanation of why the "corrugations" are present and how 3D printing of highly detailed vertical surfaces is still problematical. (Sort of a warm-up for my Cocoa Beach clinic.) Since Eric posts to multiple forums I put everything in a pdf document on my web site:
http://www.pullmanproject.com/Gondola.pdf
Thanks Tom, very informative. This proves to me that Shapeways is just maxed out and still found wanting. It's no longer an issue of resolution, but designing around the "wax tracks". It seems the SLA process is better suited to our parts. Compare these pix to the pix of the D&RGW coal hopper Eric presented a week or so ago.

Dennis Storzek


Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, Dec 19, 2019 at 12:50 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
Compare these pix to the pix of the D&RGW coal hopper Eric presented a week or so ago.
... Of course you can't find them because they were Utah Coal Route cars... Geesh.
Link to message with pix

Dennis Storzek


Tony Thompson
 

Dennis Storzek wrote:

Compare these pix to the pix of the D&RGW coal hopper Eric presented a week or so ago.... Of course you can't find them because they were Utah Coal Route cars... Geesh.
Link to message with pix

      Nor are they hoppers . . . <g>

Tony Thompson