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RF&F Sand Hopper


James McDonald
 

Thanks for the photos, Garth. Very interesting.

Yes, David is correct. The RF&P’s small fleet of sand hoppers were used for transporting locomotive sand between the Kyanite source mine in Dillwyn, Va. to loco facilities at Acca and Potomac Yards.

The initial donor cars for the RF&P’s fleet of sand hoppers were taken seemingly at random from the line's pool of two bay open hoppers. Initially the series consisted of RFP 7001-7004, formerly cars RFP 3573, and RFP 3576-3578, which were outside post hoppers.

In 1972, as David said, the RF&P bought a series of offset 2 bay hoppers from the B&LE. Originally built in October of 1942, these cars were rehabbed by Ortner before sale to the RF&P. Six of them were taken to be rebuilt into covered hoppers. The ex-BLE cars were numbered 7001-7070* and sand hopper fleet was renumbered RFP 11 to 18.

It’s interesting that this car still rides on solid bearing trucks at this date. The RF&P began converting these cars to roller bearing trucks earlier in the 1970s using ones that came off of scrapped boxcars. Consequently, many of these sand hoppers wound up with the unusual configuration of black bodies with blue trucks.

All the best,

James
=-=-=
James McDonald
Greenbelt, MD.

* The series appears to have been numbered up to 7070, although it’s not clear the entire range was ever occupied. Different RF&P internal documents refer to different quantities.


Richard Townsend
 

I just dug out my “Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac in Color” and there’s an almost square on shot of RF&P 14 on page 124.

On Jan 19, 2020, at 8:00 AM, Richard Townsend via Groups.Io <richtownsend=netscape.net@groups.io> wrote:

Mike Bradley and Jim Six had an article on building B&LE two-bay hoppers using the Athearn offset side hopper and MDC trucks. It was in the July 1990 Model Railroading.
On Jan 19, 2020, at 6:48 AM, David via Groups.Io <jaydeet2001=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

RF&P 16 was one of series 11-18, conversions of the series 7001-7062 70-ton twin hoppers RF&P bought secondhand from B&LE in 1972 to replace its steam-era hopper fleet.

David Thompson





Richard Townsend
 

Mike Bradley and Jim Six had an article on building B&LE two-bay hoppers using the Athearn offset side hopper and MDC trucks. It was in the July 1990 Model Railroading.

On Jan 19, 2020, at 6:48 AM, David via Groups.Io <jaydeet2001=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

RF&P 16 was one of series 11-18, conversions of the series 7001-7062 70-ton twin hoppers RF&P bought secondhand from B&LE in 1972 to replace its steam-era hopper fleet.

David Thompson



David
 

RF&P 16 was one of series 11-18, conversions of the series 7001-7062 70-ton twin hoppers RF&P bought secondhand from B&LE in 1972 to replace its steam-era hopper fleet.

David Thompson


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

I would like to offer two photos of a most unusual RF&P covered hopper for your approval and commentary. The car is RF&P 14, apparently used in company sand service. While numbered in the RF&P maintenance fleet, it still was obviously sent off line.

This car is an apparent conversion of a standard open hopper. In 1954 the RF&P had 96 hoppers from three groups in revenue service. While I can't be sure, it is probably a conversion of one of these cars. Note the most unusual trucks, that appear to have outside brake hangers. AFAIK from the photo, the hangers are not used, but they may point to the origins of this car if it was bought used by the RF&P. Can any of you comment upon the origin of the car, and its possible conversion date? Were there any more of these cars? What are these trucks called?

I shot the car around 1987 on the Dixon Sand Co. loading track in Dillwyn, Virginia. Dixon Sand was a Kyanite Corporation subsidiary, the sand being a by-product of their mining operation on near-by Willis Mountain (ore and sand both delivered to the railhead by truck). Apparently Dixon sold sand to the RF&P and the Chessie System for locomotives. Dillwyn was at the end of the former C&O Buckingham Subdivision, now the Buckingham Branch Railroad. The spur and loader are still there, but have not been active for many years.

My apologies for the oblique angle on the car. As I remember it, there was a steep drop off to my left, and I couldn't get a straight view of the whole car side. Except for the truck photo, all shots I took of  the various cars on this spur over the years are from approximately the same spot, a grade crossing.

Yours Aye,

Mungo Napier, Laird of Mallard Lodge  🦆