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Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car


Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

Circa 1920 photo of another use for a livestock car:

https://calisphere.org/item/6b72bf20ae08e9ac37dc6518e2fdb783/

Caption: "Workers from Richmond-Chase canning company unloading crates of fruit from railroad cars."

Use the slider to enlarge the photo.

The car belongs to Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio Railway, which I believe was a Southern Pacific subsidiary in Texas and Louisiana.

The car tag is almost readable and maybe reads "This car was ____ ____ and disinfected".

The Richmond-Chase Company became one of the primary fruit canning giants in Santa Clara County, CA. The company maintained four major packing and canning plants in San Jose, and had other agricultural operations in central California, as well as owning several orchards.

Plant, circa 1920:

http://digitalcollections.sjlibrary.org/cdm/ref/collection/sjsurc/id/21

Shows several boxcars (at least one SP) apparently loaded with empty cans.

Use the slider to enlarge the photo.

I can't determine if the SP livestock car has a load of cans.

Shipping ready-to-fill cans was not uncommon at one time:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2017782124/

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Doug Paasch
 

Nice photos Bob.  Thanks for a great tidbit of info regarding an alternate use of stock cars.  Regarding shipping empty cans in stock cars, its seems unlikely but I’d never say never.  As you can see in the third photo where men are unloading cans from a box car, there is a heavy canvas (or something) liner in the box car to keep the cans clean.  I would think a stock car would be very difficult to keep clean from dust, if nothing else, even with a canvas liner (although I know they used stock cars for shipping grain in a pinch by lining them with plastic sheeting; however, grain is expected to contain a certain amount of dirt content).  My dad worked for Continental Can Company and told me that any contamination, like dirt or dust, was sufficient grounds for the consignee to reject the cans, so the can plant was VERY careful about keeping cans clean in shipment.  That’s why I doubt that stock cars were ever used, just because of the wind factor and the difficulty in keeping dirt/dust from blowing into the car.  But if anyone comes across a picture of a stock car, lined sufficiently to carry cans, I’d sure like to see it.

 

Doug Paasch

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2020 10:56 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

 

Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

Circa 1920 photo of another use for a livestock car:

https://calisphere.org/item/6b72bf20ae08e9ac37dc6518e2fdb783/

Caption: "Workers from Richmond-Chase canning company unloading crates of fruit from railroad cars."

Use the slider to enlarge the photo.

The car belongs to Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio Railway, which I believe was a Southern Pacific subsidiary in Texas and Louisiana.

The car tag is almost readable and maybe reads "This car was ____ ____ and disinfected".

The Richmond-Chase Company became one of the primary fruit canning giants in Santa Clara County, CA. The company maintained four major packing and canning plants in San Jose, and had other agricultural operations in central California, as well as owning several orchards.

Plant, circa 1920:

http://digitalcollections.sjlibrary.org/cdm/ref/collection/sjsurc/id/21

Shows several boxcars (at least one SP) apparently loaded with empty cans.

Use the slider to enlarge the photo.

I can't determine if the SP livestock car has a load of cans.

Shipping ready-to-fill cans was not uncommon at one time:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2017782124/

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Doug Paasch
 

Looking at the photo closer, it appears to be a heavy paper liner.

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Doug Paasch via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2020 4:00 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

 

Nice photos Bob.  Thanks for a great tidbit of info regarding an alternate use of stock cars.  Regarding shipping empty cans in stock cars, its seems unlikely but I’d never say never.  As you can see in the third photo where men are unloading cans from a box car, there is a heavy canvas (or something) liner in the box car to keep the cans clean.  I would think a stock car would be very difficult to keep clean from dust, if nothing else, even with a canvas liner (although I know they used stock cars for shipping grain in a pinch by lining them with plastic sheeting; however, grain is expected to contain a certain amount of dirt content).  My dad worked for Continental Can Company and told me that any contamination, like dirt or dust, was sufficient grounds for the consignee to reject the cans, so the can plant was VERY careful about keeping cans clean in shipment.  That’s why I doubt that stock cars were ever used, just because of the wind factor and the difficulty in keeping dirt/dust from blowing into the car.  But if anyone comes across a picture of a stock car, lined sufficiently to carry cans, I’d sure like to see it.

 

Doug Paasch

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2020 10:56 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

 

Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

Circa 1920 photo of another use for a livestock car:

https://calisphere.org/item/6b72bf20ae08e9ac37dc6518e2fdb783/

Caption: "Workers from Richmond-Chase canning company unloading crates of fruit from railroad cars."

Use the slider to enlarge the photo.

The car belongs to Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio Railway, which I believe was a Southern Pacific subsidiary in Texas and Louisiana.

The car tag is almost readable and maybe reads "This car was ____ ____ and disinfected".

The Richmond-Chase Company became one of the primary fruit canning giants in Santa Clara County, CA. The company maintained four major packing and canning plants in San Jose, and had other agricultural operations in central California, as well as owning several orchards.

Plant, circa 1920:

http://digitalcollections.sjlibrary.org/cdm/ref/collection/sjsurc/id/21

Shows several boxcars (at least one SP) apparently loaded with empty cans.

Use the slider to enlarge the photo.

I can't determine if the SP livestock car has a load of cans.

Shipping ready-to-fill cans was not uncommon at one time:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2017782124/

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Jim Betz
 

Hi,
  I worked in a salmon cannery in Anacortes, Wa. in the late 50's/early 60's.
We received box car loads of cans that were packed into very large
cardboard boxes that were on top of a pallet.  The dimensions of the 
box were the size of the pallet on the bottom and about 4 or 5 feet tall.
The pallets were loaded into the box cars with fork lifts and were stacked
two pallets high and pretty much filling the entire box car.  They were
moved to the can loft above and along one side of the cannery and 
stored in long lines on either side of a central aisle.  During canning
operations the pallets of cans were moved to a machine in the loft
and slid off the pallet from the fork lift.  I do not remember if the cans
were unloaded from the box bottom or top (tilted) by the machine -
but that machine fed the can line directly from the can loft to both
canning lines which were run to the actual canning machine and
rammed the salmon into the cans.  The movement of the cans was
done in long open "tubes" similar to current automated canning.  I
can probably find pics of the can loft part of the operation if needed.
                                                                                         - Jim 


Lee Thwaits
 

In 40's & at least early 50's cans were hauled in bulk in stock cars from can co. ( in San Jose?) to Prattlow cannery in Santa Clara.  Cars were steam cleaned first then lined with heavy craft paper.
Lee Thwaits


Doug Paasch
 

Thanks for sharing that Lee. So the paper lining was sufficient to keep the cans clean even in a stock car?

Doug Paasch

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Lee Thwaits
Sent: Monday, January 20, 2020 10:09 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

In 40's & at least early 50's cans were hauled in bulk in stock cars from can co. ( in San Jose?) to Prattlow cannery in Santa Clara. Cars were steam cleaned first then lined with heavy craft paper.
Lee Thwaits


Bob Chaparro
 

Placard: Tin Cans

Just to show that tin can loads were called out for special handling:

https://aadl.org/sites/default/files/photos/N082_0371_001.jpg

Description:

"SCRAP RUBBER COLLECTIONS BEGIN TO LEAVE ANN ARBOR: Proof that Ann Arbor and Washtenaw county residents' efforts in the recently-ended scrap rubber collection campaign were not in vain is offered in this picture which shows the first shipment of scrap to leave the city. Cars shown above being loaded from the 50-ton plus pile gathered at the Staebler-Kempf station depot will carry 18 tons of rubber each to the Rubber Reserve Corp. collection depot in Cleveland from whence it will be turned over to varied rubber companies for reclaiming operations.

Published in Issue

Ann Arbor News, July 29, 1942"

Of course, somebody should have removed the placard after the car was unloaded.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Bob and List Members,
 
 
Thanks Bob for the reference to that nice image.
 
Other good images can be found on the site.
 
Some of my favorites are at the links below.
 
Unloading containers of lime from gondola onto a truck...
 
 
 

UTLX tank car, INFLAMMABLE placard...
 
 

Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, January 27, 2020 11:39 AM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Fruit From A Livestock Car

Placard: Tin Cans

Just to show that tin can loads were called out for special handling:

https://aadl.org/sites/default/files/photos/N082_0371_001.jpg

Description:

"SCRAP RUBBER COLLECTIONS BEGIN TO LEAVE ANN ARBOR: Proof that Ann Arbor and Washtenaw county residents' efforts in the recently-ended scrap rubber collection campaign were not in vain is offered in this picture which shows the first shipment of scrap to leave the city. Cars shown above being loaded from the 50-ton plus pile gathered at the Staebler-Kempf station depot will carry 18 tons of rubber each to the Rubber Reserve Corp. collection depot in Cleveland from whence it will be turned over to varied rubber companies for reclaiming operations.

Published in Issue

Ann Arbor News, July 29, 1942"

Of course, somebody should have removed the placard after the car was unloaded.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Bruce Smith
 

B&O class M??  # ??5234, Built 12-41, by Pullman (based on the sill tabs). It has a nice slack adjuster and looks to probably have a Duryea under frame.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Jan 27, 2020, at 10:39 AM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Placard: Tin Cans

Just to show that tin can loads were called out for special handling:

https://aadl.org/sites/default/files/photos/N082_0371_001.jpg

Description:

"SCRAP RUBBER COLLECTIONS BEGIN TO LEAVE ANN ARBOR: Proof that Ann Arbor and Washtenaw county residents' efforts in the recently-ended scrap rubber collection campaign were not in vain is offered in this picture which shows the first shipment of scrap to leave the city. Cars shown above being loaded from the 50-ton plus pile gathered at the Staebler-Kempf station depot will carry 18 tons of rubber each to the Rubber Reserve Corp. collection depot in Cleveland from whence it will be turned over to varied rubber companies for reclaiming operations.

Published in Issue

Ann Arbor News, July 29, 1942"

Of course, somebody should have removed the placard after the car was unloaded.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



Edward
 

The B&O boxcar in the photo showing scrap rubber being loaded is a member of Class M-55a.
Numbers were 465000 - 465899, built by Pullman Standard with Duryea underframes, late 1941 to early 1942.
Ed Bommer


Jeff Ward
 

Interesting photo of the scrap rubber drive posted by Bob Chaparro.

https://aadl.org/sites/default/files/photos/N082_0371_001.jpg

Of note (to me at least) is the Durea underframe slack adjuster mechanism under the right side of the door.

Jeff Ward
Norwalk, CT