Topics

Model: CB&Q "Bomber Boxcar"


Bob Chaparro
 

Model: CB&Q "Bomber Boxcar"

A model photo from the NAPM Model Railroad Club:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/napmltd/41672943110/

Caption: "In 1942 the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy modified some of their 50' automobile boxcars to carry wings of B-26 Marauder bombers to an Army Air Corps assembly plant near Omaha. The CB&Q shops built 26" high side extensions and reattached the old roof to the raised sides. The wings were loaded and unloaded through the hinged doors on the 'A' end of the boxcar.

After the war these cars were used for high cube, lightweight loads such as appliances and furniture. The cars fared poorly in their new assignment — those types of loads weren't as robust as airplane wings — with cargo damage often the result of excess sway. Eventually the boxcars were put into general service alongside normal-height 50' cars."

Does anyone have a prototype photo or link to a prototype photo?

How many cars did the CB&Q modify?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Riverboy
 

Is this a scratchbuilt model, or a resin kit, or something else? It looks great!

Tod C Dwyer

On Sunday, March 15, 2020, 03:30:39 PM EDT, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Model: CB&Q "Bomber Boxcar"

A model photo from the NAPM Model Railroad Club:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/napmltd/41672943110/

Caption: "In 1942 the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy modified some of their 50' automobile boxcars to carry wings of B-26 Marauder bombers to an Army Air Corps assembly plant near Omaha. The CB&Q shops built 26" high side extensions and reattached the old roof to the raised sides. The wings were loaded and unloaded through the hinged doors on the 'A' end of the boxcar.

After the war these cars were used for high cube, lightweight loads such as appliances and furniture. The cars fared poorly in their new assignment — those types of loads weren't as robust as airplane wings — with cargo damage often the result of excess sway. Eventually the boxcars were put into general service alongside normal-height 50' cars."

Does anyone have a prototype photo or link to a prototype photo?

How many cars did the CB&Q modify?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Bill Welch
 

The origins of the model and it builder are in the caption w/the photo.

Bill Welch


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

That has to be about the ugliest boxcar I've ever seen. Way cool!

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff  🦆


On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 4:40 PM Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:
The origins of the model and it builder are in the caption w/the photo.

Bill Welch


al_brown03
 

I know of two sources on these:
Culotta, "Freight Cars Reference Manual", v 1, p 192
Masterson, Wagner, and Hoffman, RP CYC 12, pp 46-87 (see especially pp 78-83)

CB&Q class XA-14D (100 cars, 46650-46749) were built in the company shops in 1937-38. After Pearl Harbor, 60 of this class were rebuilt with 26" roof extensions, to carry wings and other parts for B-26 and B-29 bombers. The modified XA-14Ds were converted back to their original height during 1946. The Masterson article has two photos of CB&Q 46741 with its extended roof, and Culotta has a 1963 photo of the same car at its original height.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Nelson Moyer
 

The Burlington Bulletin on the extended roof XA-14D cars states that some served out they’re life without conversion to original height. I’m traveling, so I can’t access my source until next week.

Nelson Moyer

On Mar 15, 2020, at 4:31 PM, al_brown03 <abrown@...> wrote:

I know of two sources on these:
Culotta, "Freight Cars Reference Manual", v 1, p 192
Masterson, Wagner, and Hoffman, RP CYC 12, pp 46-87 (see especially pp 78-83)

CB&Q class XA-14D (100 cars, 46650-46749) were built in the company shops in 1937-38. After Pearl Harbor, 60 of this class were rebuilt with 26" roof extensions, to carry wings and other parts for B-26 and B-29 bombers. The modified XA-14Ds were converted back to their original height during 1946. The Masterson article has two photos of CB&Q 46741 with its extended roof, and Culotta has a 1963 photo of the same car at its original height.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Douglas Harding
 

If you read the caption of the photo posted, you will learn it was built from a Sunshine kit.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Riverboy via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 2:35 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Model: CB&Q "Bomber Boxcar"

 

Is this a scratchbuilt model, or a resin kit, or something else? It looks great!

 

Tod C Dwyer

 

On Sunday, March 15, 2020, 03:30:39 PM EDT, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

 

 

Model: CB&Q "Bomber Boxcar"

A model photo from the NAPM Model Railroad Club:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/napmltd/41672943110/

Caption: "In 1942 the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy modified some of their 50' automobile boxcars to carry wings of B-26 Marauder bombers to an Army Air Corps assembly plant near Omaha. The CB&Q shops built 26" high side extensions and reattached the old roof to the raised sides. The wings were loaded and unloaded through the hinged doors on the 'A' end of the boxcar.

After the war these cars were used for high cube, lightweight loads such as appliances and furniture. The cars fared poorly in their new assignment — those types of loads weren't as robust as airplane wings — with cargo damage often the result of excess sway. Eventually the boxcars were put into general service alongside normal-height 50' cars."

Does anyone have a prototype photo or link to a prototype photo?

How many cars did the CB&Q modify?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Scott
 

Not to high jack this thread but the NYC had a very similar car to this one for B-29 production as well.  If you have Amazon Prime Video search "B29 Bomber Films" and a short movie will pop up with that name.  It has some excellent views of the car including the end door which has eluded many researchers.

Scott McDonald 


Mont Switzer
 

Bob,

 

We might want to chat off list about C.I.L. 1471 that appears in the photo.  mswitzer@....

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 3:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Model: CB&Q "Bomber Boxcar"

 

Model: CB&Q "Bomber Boxcar"

A model photo from the NAPM Model Railroad Club:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/napmltd/41672943110/

Caption: "In 1942 the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy modified some of their 50' automobile boxcars to carry wings of B-26 Marauder bombers to an Army Air Corps assembly plant near Omaha. The CB&Q shops built 26" high side extensions and reattached the old roof to the raised sides. The wings were loaded and unloaded through the hinged doors on the 'A' end of the boxcar.

After the war these cars were used for high cube, lightweight loads such as appliances and furniture. The cars fared poorly in their new assignment — those types of loads weren't as robust as airplane wings — with cargo damage often the result of excess sway. Eventually the boxcars were put into general service alongside normal-height 50' cars."

Does anyone have a prototype photo or link to a prototype photo?

How many cars did the CB&Q modify?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Dave Lotz
 

If anyone is interested, Q Connection has the remaining RP CYC 12's in stock for $12.95 plus shipping. 
See www.QConnection.biz and click on Books & Pubs.

Dave Lotz


james murrie
 

The B-26 and later B-29 assembly plant was the Martin factory on what is now Offutt AFB(previously Fort Crook) south of Bellevue NE.  The building was later made part of the base and called "Building C" when I was stationed there in the 1970s.  You could still see the floors made out of wooden blocks.  We used to go jogging on the lower floor (below ground level) in the winter.  They had also put in a bowling alley and a lot of other things including a "Sattelite Control Squadron" that officially controlled weather satellites for AF Global Weather Central. On the other hand, we also had a strategic reconnaissance wing.
The big end doors at the end of what had been the assembly line rolled out into the end of the runway.  One of the B-29s that dropped the atomic bomb was built there.  It was very close to the tracks that ran south out of Omaha. I believe the official station name was Fort Crook even in the 1970s.
Even though I was stationed at SAC HQ, I spent several nights in the building when I was tagged for Officer of the Day duty.

Jim Murrie


Tim O'Connor
 


The 1950 and 1955 ORER's show a number of 50 foot cars with 11-2 or 11-3 interior heights.
That's clearly extra tall for 1950's box cars!

Tim O'Connor


On 3/15/2020 9:02 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:
The Burlington Bulletin on the extended roof XA-14D cars states that some served out they’re life without conversion to original height. I’m traveling, so I can’t access my source until next week.

Nelson Moyer

On Mar 15, 2020, at 4:31 PM, al_brown03 <abrown@...> wrote:

I know of two sources on these:
Culotta, "Freight Cars Reference Manual", v 1, p 192
Masterson, Wagner, and Hoffman, RP CYC 12, pp 46-87 (see especially pp 78-83)

CB&Q class XA-14D (100 cars, 46650-46749) were built in the company shops in 1937-38. After Pearl Harbor, 60 of this class were rebuilt with 26" roof extensions, to carry wings and other parts for B-26 and B-29 bombers. The modified XA-14Ds were converted back to their original height during 1946. The Masterson article has two photos of CB&Q 46741 with its extended roof, and Culotta has a 1963 photo of the same car at its original height.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Scott Seders
 

Did these boxcars haul wing assemblies from Martin’s Baltimore plant to Omaha or did they originate somewhere else?

Scott Seders
Salisbury, MD 

On Mar 16, 2020, at 4:57 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



The 1950 and 1955 ORER's show a number of 50 foot cars with 11-2 or 11-3 interior heights.
That's clearly extra tall for 1950's box cars!

Tim O'Connor


On 3/15/2020 9:02 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:
The Burlington Bulletin on the extended roof XA-14D cars states that some served out they’re life without conversion to original height. I’m traveling, so I can’t access my source until next week.

Nelson Moyer

On Mar 15, 2020, at 4:31 PM, al_brown03 <abrown@...> wrote:

I know of two sources on these:
Culotta, "Freight Cars Reference Manual", v 1, p 192
Masterson, Wagner, and Hoffman, RP CYC 12, pp 46-87 (see especially pp 78-83)

CB&Q class XA-14D (100 cars, 46650-46749) were built in the company shops in 1937-38. After Pearl Harbor, 60 of this class were rebuilt with 26" roof extensions, to carry wings and other parts for B-26 and B-29 bombers. The modified XA-14Ds were converted back to their original height during 1946. The Masterson article has two photos of CB&Q 46741 with its extended roof, and Culotta has a 1963 photo of the same car at its original height.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


John Larkin
 

Jim,

Thanks for the info.  I've been trying to figure out where the tracks ran in and it appears to be from the northwest side of the base, just looking at the connecting railroad configuration and how it could have run into or next to (looks like something was there) the buildings.  There is also a very short section of track left in place off the CB&Q line on the southeast side of the base, and what may be (from Google) a connection at the other end to the former MP that also served the buildings on the north.

Our building is the oldest on base, and it includes a 3' thick brick wall inside.  Evidently it had been a stable, a blacksmith shop and, according to an unofficial source, a train depot though I'm not sure where or how the track connection could have been made.  No B-29s there any more though there are a couple of B-52s at the main entrance and a B-17 inside the base on the south side.

Lot of history on that base, I'm just trying to get a handle on the railroad side of it.  I only got stuck with Officer of the Day duty a couple of times, but overseas not there. 

John Larkin



On Monday, March 16, 2020, 12:27:02 PM CDT, james murrie via Groups.Io <bi291@...> wrote:


The B-26 and later B-29 assembly plant was the Martin factory on what is now Offutt AFB(previously Fort Crook) south of Bellevue NE.  The building was later made part of the base and called "Building C" when I was stationed there in the 1970s.  You could still see the floors made out of wooden blocks.  We used to go jogging on the lower floor (below ground level) in the winter.  They had also put in a bowling alley and a lot of other things including a "Sattelite Control Squadron" that officially controlled weather satellites for AF Global Weather Central. On the other hand, we also had a strategic reconnaissance wing.
The big end doors at the end of what had been the assembly line rolled out into the end of the runway.  One of the B-29s that dropped the atomic bomb was built there.  It was very close to the tracks that ran south out of Omaha. I believe the official station name was Fort Crook even in the 1970s.
Even though I was stationed at SAC HQ, I spent several nights in the building when I was tagged for Officer of the Day duty.

Jim Murrie


Scott
 

Tim can you post a few car numbers from the ORER of the 11ft cars please.  I have a Bomber Boxcar in my stash would like to run it 1950ish.

Thanks
Scott McDonald 


William Hirt
 

The track is still inside the Martin Bomber Building. I used to go regularly to Global Weather Central (or Center depending on the commander at the time) to coordinate backup activities. One day we had a fire alarm while I was there and I went with our hosts out to north side of the building. I had some time to look around because of that. The inside tracks and loading dock was still there. My grandfather worked there building bombers in World War II.

Bil Hirt

On 3/16/2020 7:47 PM, John Larkin via Groups.Io wrote:
Jim,

Thanks for the info.  I've been trying to figure out where the tracks ran in and it appears to be from the northwest side of the base, just looking at the connecting railroad configuration and how it could have run into or next to (looks like something was there) the buildings.  There is also a very short section of track left in place off the CB&Q line on the southeast side of the base, and what may be (from Google) a connection at the other end to the former MP that also served the buildings on the north.

Our building is the oldest on base, and it includes a 3' thick brick wall inside.  Evidently it had been a stable, a blacksmith shop and, according to an unofficial source, a train depot though I'm not sure where or how the track connection could have been made.  No B-29s there any more though there are a couple of B-52s at the main entrance and a B-17 inside the base on the south side.

Lot of history on that base, I'm just trying to get a handle on the railroad side of it.  I only got stuck with Officer of the Day duty a couple of times, but overseas not there. 

John Larkin