Topics

New Run: Rapido HO Scale General American Meat Reefer


poweredby251
 

MP 9003 was an SC built in 1937 with a Winton 8-201A engine.  The stacks were offset that way as built.

John Gadow
==============================================================================


-Say Tim, What in the world do the MOP do to that EMD switcher that moved the exhaust stacks off to the
-left side and radically changed the roof vents ahead f them as well? Talk abut the Rock Island's Christine,
-this is quite a rebuild!
 
-Cordially, Don Valentine


Tom Madden
 

On Sat, Apr 4, 2020 at 12:42 PM, Todd Sullivan wrote:
Tim,

Thanks, those are great photos and they show exactly what I was trying to describe!  There's one other photo I know about that is in one of the small softcover Anthracite railroad books.  It shows an overhead view of the CNJ yard on the Lehigh River with 3 SLRX reefers.  Since all my Eastern RR books are in storage elsewhere, I can't check.
"Memories of Eastern Pennsylvania Railroading" by Gerald Bernet, page 9. Two red Swift reefers, distant view, roofs are a dirty dark freight car red with a couple of lighter red individual boards. Lots of other interesting freight cars in the shot, including an obligatory NP box car, but the half toning gets in the way of being able to say much about individual cars. Great overall view of the CNJ's (CRP's?) Jim Thorpe yards in 1953, though. One of my favorite books but I wish it had been done in a larger format with higher quality reproduction. (It's 8.5 x 11, horizontal format.)

Tom Madden


Tony Thompson
 

Todd Sullivan wrote Dreferring to Tony Koester)e\:

Back in his Allegheny Midland layout days, I once asked him why he didn't detail and weather all his hopper cars.  He replied that he needed 200 hoppers and was still trying to finish work on the layout.  That was an instant "Oh, never thought about that" from me.  

      Reminds me of my days in Pittsburgh, when my good friend C.J. Riley always had an excellent entry in the model contests at NMRA regionals. At one of those meets, C.J. casually mentioned to someone that he was starting a layout. The other person immediately responded, "I guess we won't be seeing you in the contest room any more." I was surprised at the comment, and said so, and the reply was, "Wait and see." Of course, he was right. Ya just can't do everything.

Tony Thompson




Todd Sullivan
 

Thank you, Tim, I stand corrected.  My fingers are dyslexic.  I know the difference: SRLX = meat, SLRX = beer.

Todd Sullivan


Tim O'Connor
 


Whoa thar, Todd ! Be careful with reporting marks :-D

  SLRX = St Louis Refrigerator
  SRLX = Swift


On 4/4/2020 2:42 PM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io wrote:

Tim,

Thanks, those are great photos and they show exactly what I was trying to describe!  There's one other photo I know about that is in one of the small softcover Anthracite railroad books.  It shows an overhead view of the CNJ yard on the Lehigh River with 3 SLRX reefers.  Since all my Eastern RR books are in storage elsewhere, I can't check.

Thanks again!

Todd Sullivan

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Todd Sullivan
 

IIRC, when Tony bought these Atlas cars, they were the only RTR Swift meat reefer models available.  He was acquiring a fleet of meat reefers for the traffic out of Kansas City.  All other available models were resin kits, and he wasn't going to build 25-30 resin kits for his fleet due to cost and time-to-build.  Back in his Allegheny Midland layout days, I once asked him why he didn't detail and weather all his hopper cars.  He replied that he needed 200 hoppers and was still trying to finish work on the layout.  That was an instant "Oh, never thought about that" from me.  There are a few other SLRX reefers on his current layout, but the Atlas cars really filled the need at the  time.  Such are the compromises when you build a large layout.

Todd Sullivan.



Todd Sullivan
 

Tim,

Thanks, those are great photos and they show exactly what I was trying to describe!  There's one other photo I know about that is in one of the small softcover Anthracite railroad books.  It shows an overhead view of the CNJ yard on the Lehigh River with 3 SLRX reefers.  Since all my Eastern RR books are in storage elsewhere, I can't check.

Thanks again!

Todd Sullivan


Tim O'Connor
 


It's an EMD SC or SW (not sure which, only difference is the frame),
and that's how they were built (over 100 were built)


On 4/4/2020 1:44 PM, Donald B. Valentine via groups.io wrote:
Say Tim, What in the world do the MOP do to that EMD switcher that moved the exhaust stacks off to the
left side and radically changed the roof vents ahead f them as well? Talk abut the Rock Island's Christine,
this is quite a rebuild!

Cordially, Don Valentine


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Bob Webber
 

Not much to that - the vents are as delivered as are the stack locations. 

Early SC switcher, if I recall correctly. Winton powered.


At 12:44 PM 4/4/2020, Donald B. Valentine via groups.io wrote:
Say Tim, What in the world do the MOP do to that EMD switcher that moved the exhaust stacks off to the
left side and radically changed the roof vents ahead f them as well? Talk abut the Rock Island's Christine,
this is quite a rebuild!

Cordially, Don Valentine

Bob Webber


Schuyler Larrabee
 

GREAT photos for weathering, Tim.

Thanks.

Schuyler

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Saturday, April 04, 2020 9:23 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] New Run: Rapido HO Scale General American Meat Reefer


My favorite roof shots of Swift reefers.


On 4/3/2020 10:19 PM, Richard Townsend via groups.io wrote:
The Swift cars had BCR roofs, including the red cars. Obviously they
weathered to streaky gray and red. I’ll defer to others on the silver,
at least for the wood sided cars.


On Apr 3, 2020, at 5:30 PM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io
<sullivant41=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Brian,

Nice catch. My Rapido reefers are in storage in Syracuse, so I'd
better make a note to check the SRLX car when we are reunited. I'll
also check my Sunshine kit that is painted but not assembled. Hmmm,
maybe I should dig it out and finish it during this corona virus lull.

Fun story: Tony Koester had 26 of those red Atlas reefers, and Atlas
only produced about 6 numbers. As occasional yardmaster in
Frankfort's eastbound yard, I got awfully tired of seeing numbers
repeat in a cut of Swift reefers from Kansas City. So, I offered to
rework them a bit and renumber them, working in batches of 4-5 cars.
The next operating session, Tony presented me with a box with all 26
(!) along with some dry transfer numbers that were exactly right for
the Atlas lettering. The dry transfers didn't work very well, and I
decided it was easier to hand re-letter the cars. I found that any
of the numbers 0, 6 and 9, could be easily transformed into another
of those numbers, and the same for 3, 6 and 8, so that's how they got
renumbered. I tried using decals for the journal repack data, and
the first car took about 2.5 hours to get the decals settled into the
scribed siding on both sides. Nope, that wasn't going to work,
either, so I faked the RPKD data with tiny dabs of white paint. It
works with the 2 foot rule - no one has mentioned that it isn't
legible, and I still use the technique on my models!

Todd Sullivan

--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Say Tim, What in the world do the MOP do to that EMD switcher that moved the exhaust stacks off to the
left side and radically changed the roof vents ahead f them as well? Talk abut the Rock Island's Christine,
this is quite a rebuild!

Cordially, Don Valentine


Eric Hansmann
 

FYI, I saw three or four of the original run at Chuck’s Depot in Marion, IL, last fall on the return trip from RPM Chicagoland. I do not recall the price, road numbers, or company names. I suspect he is open since he lives upstairs.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 3, 2020 5:25 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] New Run: Rapido HO Scale General American Meat Reefer

 

New Run: Rapido HO Scale General American Meat Reefer

From the Rapido website: "Rapido is pleased to announce a new production run of our HO scale General American 37’ meat refrigerator car! It has been quite a while since we’ve offered these popular cars for sale, and it’s about time that we did some more! We are offering new road numbers on some of the most popular schemes from the earlier runs, as well as an all-new HO release."

https://rapidotrains.com/products/ho-scale/freight-cars/ho-scale-37-general-american-garx-reefer

These are available in multiple road numbers for:

American Stores

Armour

Cudahy

Dubuque

GARX Refrigerator

Hormel

Kingan

Morris Rifkin

Oscar Meyer

Swift (Red Block, Red Billboard & War Bonds)

URTX Refrigerator

Undecorated

I have no idea whether all of these variants are accurate for prototype cars, however.

I have no financial connection to Rapido.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Gary Bechdol
 

Regarding the Swift "War Bonds" reefers, the photo of  SRLX 6307 on page 172 of Ted's Steam Era Freight Cars Reference Manual Vol 3, the upper band shows dark (black?) lettering on a lighter background, possibly yellow.  Also, the "BUY MORE WAR BONDS" appears to be lighter than the (presumably) blue bottom band.  Is it possible that the blue and white bands were added to an otherwise standard yellow painted reefer, with the "BUY MORE WAR BONDS" being in red?  Other than the photograph, is there any other documentation of this paint scheme?

Gary Bechdol
Stone Mountain, GA

On Sat, Apr 4, 2020 at 11:05 AM Douglas Harding <doug.harding@...> wrote:

Chuck if you are referring to the photos Todd posted, those are photos of Atlas models, not the Rapido model, nor are they photos of the prototype. The Atlas model came with four hinges. Atlas claimed the model was based upon a Cudahy car built in 1925, and I have a photo of a Cudahy reefer with four hinges that appears to match the Atlas model. The car in the photo was built in 1928. Four hinges were common on earlier reefers. Some early reefers also came with eight hinges. Six hinges became the defacto with most manufactures of wood cars sometime in the 20s or 30s. One reason I heard was if a hinge failed there was two other hinges on that door to hold it in place. Hinge familiar was commonly due to wood rotting because of the high moisture related to reefers. The doors were heavy because of the construction to contain the insulation and required seals.

 

There are photos of wood Swift reefers with only four hinges. Though the majority of photos show six hinges. This could be because very few photos were taken in the teens and twenties, when four hinges were more common.

 

I have never seen any data showing the number of cars broke down by number of hinges.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chuck Cover
Sent: Saturday, April 4, 2020 7:21 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] New Run: Rapido HO Scale General American Meat Reefer

 

The Swift reefers in the photo have doors with only 4 hinges, which stands out to me.  I think most reefers have doors with 6 hinges.  Can anyone tell me the difference?  Were the four hinge doors lighter weight or were the hinges more heavy duty?   How many reefer cars had the 4 hinge car?  I assume different manufacturers built the different doors.  Thanks

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


Bill Welch
 

Unfortunately Atlas choose to "Lionel'ize" these cars with grotesquely large operating hinges.

Bill Welch


Douglas Harding
 

Chuck if you are referring to the photos Todd posted, those are photos of Atlas models, not the Rapido model, nor are they photos of the prototype. The Atlas model came with four hinges. Atlas claimed the model was based upon a Cudahy car built in 1925, and I have a photo of a Cudahy reefer with four hinges that appears to match the Atlas model. The car in the photo was built in 1928. Four hinges were common on earlier reefers. Some early reefers also came with eight hinges. Six hinges became the defacto with most manufactures of wood cars sometime in the 20s or 30s. One reason I heard was if a hinge failed there was two other hinges on that door to hold it in place. Hinge familiar was commonly due to wood rotting because of the high moisture related to reefers. The doors were heavy because of the construction to contain the insulation and required seals.

 

There are photos of wood Swift reefers with only four hinges. Though the majority of photos show six hinges. This could be because very few photos were taken in the teens and twenties, when four hinges were more common.

 

I have never seen any data showing the number of cars broke down by number of hinges.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chuck Cover
Sent: Saturday, April 4, 2020 7:21 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] New Run: Rapido HO Scale General American Meat Reefer

 

The Swift reefers in the photo have doors with only 4 hinges, which stands out to me.  I think most reefers have doors with 6 hinges.  Can anyone tell me the difference?  Were the four hinge doors lighter weight or were the hinges more heavy duty?   How many reefer cars had the 4 hinge car?  I assume different manufacturers built the different doors.  Thanks

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


william darnaby
 

The rear cover photo on Morning Sun’s Refrigerator Car Color Guide shows two Swift red cars, one of which has only 4 hinges.  It’s number is 6544.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chuck Cover
Sent: Saturday, April 4, 2020 7:21 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] New Run: Rapido HO Scale General American Meat Reefer

 

The Swift reefers in the photo have doors with only 4 hinges, which stands out to me.  I think most reefers have doors with 6 hinges.  Can anyone tell me the difference?  Were the four hinge doors lighter weight or were the hinges more heavy duty?   How many reefer cars had the 4 hinge car?  I assume different manufacturers built the different doors.  Thanks

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

    With regard to the four hinge doors on meat cars I believe te majority of these were 36 ft. cars rather than 
the 37 most General American cars seem to have been. Swift rostered both, as did Cudahy, but I cannot recall 
ever seeing a photo of four hinge reefer longer than 36 ft. There seems to be a prototype for anythng, however.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Tim O'Connor
 

My favorite roof shots of Swift reefers.

On 4/3/2020 10:19 PM, Richard Townsend via groups.io wrote:
The Swift cars had BCR roofs, including the red cars. Obviously they weathered to streaky gray and red. I’ll defer to others on the silver, at least for the wood sided cars.


On Apr 3, 2020, at 5:30 PM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Brian,

Nice catch.  My Rapido reefers are in storage in Syracuse, so I'd better make a note to check the SRLX car when we are reunited.  I'll also check my Sunshine kit that is painted but not assembled.  Hmmm, maybe I should dig it out and finish it during this corona virus lull.

Fun story: Tony Koester had 26 of those red Atlas reefers, and Atlas only produced about 6 numbers.  As occasional yardmaster in Frankfort's eastbound yard, I got awfully tired of seeing numbers repeat in a cut of Swift reefers from Kansas City.  So, I offered to rework them a bit and renumber them, working in batches of 4-5 cars.  The next operating session, Tony presented me with a box with all 26 (!) along with some dry transfer numbers that were exactly right for the Atlas lettering.  The dry transfers didn't work very well, and I decided it was easier to hand re-letter the cars.  I found that any of the numbers 0, 6 and 9, could be easily transformed into another of those numbers, and the same for 3, 6 and 8, so that's how they got renumbered.  I tried using decals for the journal repack data, and the first car took about 2.5 hours to get the decals settled into the scribed siding on both sides.  Nope, that wasn't going to work, either, so I faked the RPKD data with tiny dabs of white paint.  It works with the 2 foot rule - no one has mentioned that it isn't legible, and I still use the technique on my models!

Todd Sullivan
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Chuck Cover
 

The Swift reefers in the photo have doors with only 4 hinges, which stands out to me.  I think most reefers have doors with 6 hinges.  Can anyone tell me the difference?  Were the four hinge doors lighter weight or were the hinges more heavy duty?   How many reefer cars had the 4 hinge car?  I assume different manufacturers built the different doors.  Thanks

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


Richard Townsend
 

The Swift cars had BCR roofs, including the red cars. Obviously they weathered to streaky gray and red. I’ll defer to others on the silver, at least for the wood sided cars.


On Apr 3, 2020, at 5:30 PM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:

Brian,

Nice catch.  My Rapido reefers are in storage in Syracuse, so I'd better make a note to check the SRLX car when we are reunited.  I'll also check my Sunshine kit that is painted but not assembled.  Hmmm, maybe I should dig it out and finish it during this corona virus lull.

Fun story: Tony Koester had 26 of those red Atlas reefers, and Atlas only produced about 6 numbers.  As occasional yardmaster in Frankfort's eastbound yard, I got awfully tired of seeing numbers repeat in a cut of Swift reefers from Kansas City.  So, I offered to rework them a bit and renumber them, working in batches of 4-5 cars.  The next operating session, Tony presented me with a box with all 26 (!) along with some dry transfer numbers that were exactly right for the Atlas lettering.  The dry transfers didn't work very well, and I decided it was easier to hand re-letter the cars.  I found that any of the numbers 0, 6 and 9, could be easily transformed into another of those numbers, and the same for 3, 6 and 8, so that's how they got renumbered.  I tried using decals for the journal repack data, and the first car took about 2.5 hours to get the decals settled into the scribed siding on both sides.  Nope, that wasn't going to work, either, so I faked the RPKD data with tiny dabs of white paint.  It works with the 2 foot rule - no one has mentioned that it isn't legible, and I still use the technique on my models!

Todd Sullivan