Topics

Hooker Chemical, Tacoma


Tim O'Connor
 

Jeff Helm pointed out this SPECTACULAR industrial photo from the 1960's but the Hooker Chemical
plant here was built in the 1940's and lasted through the 1990's (at least that long) so I thought
it is worth sharing around. If my stupid mail program truncates the long URL you'll have to paste
it back together to see it in your browser. :-\:-)

cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=p17061coll21&CISOPTR=32743&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=2848&DMHEIGHT=2210

===================================================

--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Well, my first thought about this spectacular photo was "Wow, a snap-track layout!" Well, not quite, the radii are larger than even 22", but I also would like to know what is that arrangement on the opposite side of the river all about?

Schuyler

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 10:27 AM
To: bbfcl@groups.io; mfcl@groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma


Jeff Helm pointed out this SPECTACULAR industrial photo from the 1960's but the Hooker Chemical plant here was built in the 1940's and lasted through the 1990's (at least that long) so I thought it is worth sharing around. If my stupid mail program truncates the long URL you'll have to paste it back together to see it in your browser. :-\:-)

cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=p17061coll21&CISOPTR=32743&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=2848&DMHEIGHT=2210

===================================================

On 4/8/2020 3:05 PM, Jeff Helm wrote:
Found the online photos, at the Tacoma Public Library digital collections. Some interesting links:
First two are the caustic tank car.

http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/32346/rec/81
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/32704/rec/92
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/5536/rec/22
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/16060/rec/44
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/32743/rec/75
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/31462/rec/50
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/13399/rec/49

--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Allen Cain
 

Great shot!

Would model it but would go broke buying those great orange and black tank cars!

Allen  Cain


Allen Cain
 

Probably has been asked and answered but does anyone know when Hooker adopted the orange and black paint scheme?

Allen Cain


Richard Townsend
 

Not sure which arrangement you're talking about, but there are boat houses (for recreational boats) to the left and to the right are places where log rafts are kept before the logs go to saw mills.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>; bbfcl <bbfcl@groups.io>; mfcl <mfcl@groups.io>; RealSTMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Apr 10, 2020 8:57 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

Well, my first thought about this spectacular photo was "Wow, a snap-track layout!"  Well, not quite, the radii are larger than even 22", but I also would like to know what is that arrangement on the opposite side of the river all about?

Schuyler

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 10:27 AM
To: bbfcl@groups.io; mfcl@groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma


Jeff Helm pointed out this SPECTACULAR industrial photo from the 1960's but the Hooker Chemical plant here was built in the 1940's and lasted through the 1990's (at least that long) so I thought it is worth sharing around. If my stupid mail program truncates the long URL you'll have to paste it back together to see it in your browser. :-\:-)

cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=p17061coll21&CISOPTR=32743&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=2848&DMHEIGHT=2210

===================================================

On 4/8/2020 3:05 PM, Jeff Helm wrote:
> Found the online photos, at the Tacoma Public Library digital collections.  Some interesting links:
> First two are the caustic tank car.
>
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/32346/rec/81
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/32704/rec/92
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/5536/rec/22
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/16060/rec/44
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/32743/rec/75
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/31462/rec/50
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/13399/rec/49
>


--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*







Schuyler Larrabee
 

Not the recreational boat houses.  I meant the arrangement directly across the river, with the rectangular part in the middle, and long dividers parallel to the flow of the river. Are those to retain log rafts?

 

BTW, which way is the river flowing, L to R, or R to L?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 12:34 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

 

Not sure which arrangement you're talking about, but there are boat houses (for recreational boats) to the left and to the right are places where log rafts are kept before the logs go to saw mills.

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>; bbfcl <bbfcl@groups.io>; mfcl <mfcl@groups.io>; RealSTMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Apr 10, 2020 8:57 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

Well, my first thought about this spectacular photo was "Wow, a snap-track layout!"  Well, not quite, the radii are larger than even 22", but I also would like to know what is that arrangement on the opposite side of the river all about?

Schuyler

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 10:27 AM
To: bbfcl@groups.io; mfcl@groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma


Jeff Helm pointed out this SPECTACULAR industrial photo from the 1960's but the Hooker Chemical plant here was built in the 1940's and lasted through the 1990's (at least that long) so I thought it is worth sharing around. If my stupid mail program truncates the long URL you'll have to paste it back together to see it in your browser. :-\:-)

cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=p17061coll21&CISOPTR=32743&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=2848&DMHEIGHT=2210

===================================================

On 4/8/2020 3:05 PM, Jeff Helm wrote:
> Found the online photos, at the Tacoma Public Library digital collections.  Some interesting links:
> First two are the caustic tank car.
>
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/32346/rec/81
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/32704/rec/92
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/5536/rec/22
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/16060/rec/44
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/32743/rec/75
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/31462/rec/50
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/13399/rec/49
>


--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*






Patrick Wade
 

Regarding the opposite river bank. I think that those are winter moorings for power boats. They drive in and are individually lifted out of the water for winter storage in their own garage. I am guessing that to leave them in the water might result in ice damage to the hulls.

Pat Wade
Santa Barbara, CA

On Apr 10, 2020, at 8:57 AM, Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
<schuyler.larrabee=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Well, my first thought about this spectacular photo was "Wow, a snap-track layout!" Well, not quite, the radii are larger than even 22", but I also would like to know what is that arrangement on the opposite side of the river all about?

Schuyler

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 10:27 AM
To: bbfcl@groups.io; mfcl@groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma


Jeff Helm pointed out this SPECTACULAR industrial photo from the 1960's but the Hooker Chemical plant here was built in the 1940's and lasted through the 1990's (at least that long) so I thought it is worth sharing around. If my stupid mail program truncates the long URL you'll have to paste it back together to see it in your browser. :-\:-)

cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=p17061coll21&CISOPTR=32743&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=2848&DMHEIGHT=2210

===================================================

On 4/8/2020 3:05 PM, Jeff Helm wrote:
Found the online photos, at the Tacoma Public Library digital collections. Some interesting links:
First two are the caustic tank car.

http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/32346/rec/81
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/32704/rec/92
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/5536/rec/22
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/16060/rec/44
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/32743/rec/75
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/31462/rec/50
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/13399/rec/49

--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*







Tom Madden
 
Edited

On Fri, Apr 10, 2020 at 10:40 AM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

Not the recreational boat houses.  I meant the arrangement directly across the river, with the rectangular part in the middle, and long dividers parallel to the flow of the river. Are those to retain log rafts?

 

BTW, which way is the river flowing, L to R, or R to L?

It's not a river - it's a tidal basin. The first two images are file photos from an April 2017 article in the Tacoma News Tribune regarding cleanup of the Hooker site. The third photo is a panorama made from three shots I took in June 1960 the day I was discharged from the USAF. I'm not sure where I was standing (Point Defiance??) but the following shots were of a stuffed and mounted NP 4-6-0. Can't tell you how the panorama relates geographically to the Hooker site, but it does show the heavy industrialization of the Tacoma waterfront as well as numerous log rafts.

Tom Madden

 

 


Tim O'Connor
 

This huge industrial area of Tacoma is the Tidal Flats - directly connected to Puget Sound.
There is fresh water too, but these waters flow back & forth with the tide. This is now the
location of a huge international container port.

On 4/10/2020 12:41 PM, Patrick Wade wrote:
Regarding the opposite river bank. I think that those are winter moorings for power boats. They drive in and are individually lifted out of the water for winter storage in their own garage. I am guessing that to leave them in the water might result in ice damage to the hulls.

Pat Wade
Santa Barbara, CA
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Thanks Tom, very much.  These shots certainly clarify what is going on around the Hooker site, and the panorama very clearly shows what those piers or booms or whatever they’d be called are for.  That’s a lot of floating wood in the river there.  Probably those logs are destined to be turned into lumber loads on freight cars, though the photos date from some future time for Steam Freight Cars (whew!).

 

Schuyler

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 1:22 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

 

On Fri, Apr 10, 2020 at 10:40 AM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

Not the recreational boat houses.  I meant the arrangement directly across the river, with the rectangular part in the middle, and long dividers parallel to the flow of the river. Are those to retain log rafts?

 

BTW, which way is the river flowing, L to R, or R to L?

It's not a river - it's a tidal basin. The first two images are file photos from an April 2017 article in the Tacoma News Tribune regarding cleanup of the Hooker site. The third photo is a panorama made from three shots I took in June 1961 the day I was discharged from the USAF. I'm not sure where I was standing (Point Defiance??) but the following shots were of a stuffed and mounted NP 4-6-0. Can't tell you how the panorama relates geographically to the Hooker site, but it does show the heavy industrialization of the Tacoma waterfront as well as numerous log rafts.

Tom Madden

 

 


Tom Madden
 

On Fri, Apr 10, 2020 at 11:39 AM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

.....Probably those logs are destined to be turned into lumber loads on freight cars, though the photos date from some future time for Steam Freight Cars (whew!).

Actually, no. It was June 1960, not 1961. I've corrected the post.

Tom M.

 

 

 


Chuck Soule
 

Tacoma's Hooker facility was actually built in the 1920s, before the Bonneville Power Administration era, because Tacoma had a very aggressive public utility dept. that built several dams for power supply, so they had cheap electricity (same reason Hooker's NY plant was next to Niagara Falls).   It was still in service in the very late 1990s when I toured it, but under a new owner.  The time slider on Google Earth shows that it was demolished about 2009. 

Regarding the views across Hylebos Waterway (tidal, not a river), there were a good number of houses on pilings or bulkheaded fill between Marine View Drive and the waterway.  There are still a few, but it is more commercialized now.  There have long been marinas and log rafts.  In the early 1950s, my Dad had a sailboat, and in the winter he would have it hauled out of the water at one of those marinas, leaving it on land all winter, and cleaning/painting the hull while it was out.  I was so young I barely remember it.

Regarding the picture of the panorama view, it was not taken at Pt. Defiance, but rather at the northern end marine view drive.  The road north of Hooker winds up the steep hillside, and there are a couple of pullout viewpoints (as well as the excellent Cliff House restaurant).

if you go to Google Earth (lat 47.286 lon -122.4042) you can still see the semicircular tracks.  Timeslide back to a good photo in 2002,  and you can still see structures.  Chlorine was loaded into tank cars next to the small buildings at the NW corner, in the bend of the Northwesterly  "snap track" curve.  Caustic Soda was loaded at the easterly corner of the property. 

If I remember correctly from the tour I took 20 years ago, Occidental made chlorinate chemicals at or next to the SE side of the plant.  To this day, there is a significant environmental cleanup issue, which I believe is more significant at the OxyChem side of the plant than associated with the original chlorine manufacturing area.  The overall residual environmental issues are a major part of why the entire site is currently vacant.

The model at the PSMRE layout at Washington State History Museum is tucked way in the back from the viewing public in a corner.  There wasn't a lot of room for Bill to build the model, so he basically did the main square 2-story brick building of the original plant and the one-story building where the tank cars were loaded.  Another club member painted the backdrop behind it to show the large stockpile of salt.  There was a lot of selective compression needed in that part of the layout, so we concentrated on creating the general tideflats atmosphere.

Chuck Soule


Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Tim,

Great photo, even if it is beyond our era. You can even see Hooker's 25T GE in the big photo (the on one of the tracks near the tank farm to the right of the photo). This locomotive shows in one of the other photos from the Tacoma PL Collection. And a Liberty Ship as a bonus. This is likely either the SS Woodbridge Ferris, or the SS Mahlon Pitney, both of which were cut up at Tacoma in 2010 after sitting derelict in Commencement Bay for years. 

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Fri, Apr 10, 2020 at 10:27 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Jeff Helm pointed out this SPECTACULAR industrial photo from the 1960's
but the Hooker Chemical
plant here was built in the 1940's and lasted through the 1990's (at
least that long) so I thought
it is worth sharing around. If my stupid mail program truncates the long
URL you'll have to paste
it back together to see it in your browser. :-\:-)

cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=p17061coll21&CISOPTR=32743&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=2848&DMHEIGHT=2210

===================================================

On 4/8/2020 3:05 PM, Jeff Helm wrote:
> Found the online photos, at the Tacoma Public Library digital collections.  Some interesting links:
> First two are the caustic tank car.
>
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/32346/rec/81
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/32704/rec/92
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/5536/rec/22
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/16060/rec/44
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/32743/rec/75
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/31462/rec/50
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/13399/rec/49
>


--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*




Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

     What a shame to cut up the Liberty Ships. I gather there was no interest on the Left Coast to restore one 
as has been done on the East Coast with the John W. Brown out of Baltimore on which crusies are offered or 
even just tours such as on the DDE USS Slater in Albany, NY or the USS Kidd in Baton Rouge, LA. IIRC there
is also a WW II flat top in NYC.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Bruce Smith
 

Really Don? 

Try the S,S, Jeremiah O'Brien 😉  https://www.ssjeremiahobrien.org

There is one on each coast. Indeed each of these ships struggles, because they are now approaching 80 years old, and a ship build in 7 days was never designed to last that long.  Not to mention ANY ship requires significant ongoing investment (def of "boat" - "a hole into the water into which you pour money")

So no, no east/west bias to be seen here.

Regards,
Bruce



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Donald B. Valentine via groups.io <riverman_vt@...>
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 6:13 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma
 
     What a shame to cut up the Liberty Ships. I gather there was no interest on the Left Coast to restore one 
as has been done on the East Coast with the John W. Brown out of Baltimore on which crusies are offered or 
even just tours such as on the DDE USS Slater in Albany, NY or the USS Kidd in Baton Rouge, LA. IIRC there
is also a WW II flat top in NYC.

Cordially, Don Valentine


maynard stowe
 

Don,
There is a Liberty Ship in San Francisco and a Victory Ship---a more modern successor to the Liberty Ship --in Richmond and may be more on the coast.
Maynard Stowe


Douglas Harding
 

I have toured the SS Jeremiah O’Brien. Great history lesson about the role and importance of the Liberty Ships and a lot fun.

 

For steam era freight car interests, the O’Brien is birthed within sight of the State Belt Railroad of San Francisco. Also a must for history buffs.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 6:30 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

 

Really Don? 

 

Try the S,S, Jeremiah O'Brien 😉  https://www.ssjeremiahobrien.org

 

There is one on each coast. Indeed each of these ships struggles, because they are now approaching 80 years old, and a ship build in 7 days was never designed to last that long.  Not to mention ANY ship requires significant ongoing investment (def of "boat" - "a hole into the water into which you pour money")

 

So no, no east/west bias to be seen here.

 

Regards,

Bruce

 

 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Donald B. Valentine via groups.io <riverman_vt@...>
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 6:13 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

 

     What a shame to cut up the Liberty Ships. I gather there was no interest on the Left Coast to restore one 

as has been done on the East Coast with the John W. Brown out of Baltimore on which crusies are offered or 

even just tours such as on the DDE USS Slater in Albany, NY or the USS Kidd in Baton Rouge, LA. IIRC there

is also a WW II flat top in NYC.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine

 


John Barry
 

The Liberty Ship SS Jeremiah O'Brien is home ported in San Francisco. The Victory Ship SS Red Oak Victory is across the bay in Richmond, and the SS Lane Victory is in San Pedro.  The Gulf coast can also claim a preserved Victory ship in the form of SS American Victory in Tampa.  All of these would have carried cargo transloaded from Steam era freight cars.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736


On Friday, April 10, 2020, 07:30:31 PM EDT, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:


Really Don? 

Try the S,S, Jeremiah O'Brien 😉  https://www.ssjeremiahobrien.org

There is one on each coast. Indeed each of these ships struggles, because they are now approaching 80 years old, and a ship build in 7 days was never designed to last that long.  Not to mention ANY ship requires significant ongoing investment (def of "boat" - "a hole into the water into which you pour money")

So no, no east/west bias to be seen here.

Regards,
Bruce



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Donald B. Valentine via groups.io <riverman_vt@...>
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 6:13 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma
 
     What a shame to cut up the Liberty Ships. I gather there was no interest on the Left Coast to restore one 
as has been done on the East Coast with the John W. Brown out of Baltimore on which crusies are offered or 
even just tours such as on the DDE USS Slater in Albany, NY or the USS Kidd in Baton Rouge, LA. IIRC there
is also a WW II flat top in NYC.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Don,
 
That “flat top” would be the USS Intrepid (CV-11), the battleship USS Massachusetts (BB-59) is in Fall River, MA, and the USS Albacore (AGSS-569) is in Portsmouth, NH.  I’m sure there are others as well.  Unfortunately the USS Skipjack (SSN-585), “the first, the fastest and the finest nuclear powered teardrop hull” was decommissioned and  “recycled” in the 1990s after more than 30 years in front line service.
 
I was assigned Skipjack in my youth.  The State Pier in New London, CT, was our homeport back then (1963-‘64).  I used to cut through the CV yard going to and from the train station.  The CV still had one or more wood cabooses in the yard.  I like to be able to find the slides I shot at the time.  I even managed to get an interior shot that took from an end platform with the camera up against a somewhat grungy window in the door.  The result was a bit dark, but still pretty good under the circumstances.  There probably were other cars I should have photographed, but just couldn’t get past my fascination with those cabooses.  I don’t recall when I last saw it, but I love to find it and the numerous other railroad photographs, mostly slides, I’ve taken over the years.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Donald B. Valentine via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 7:13 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma
 
     What a shame to cut up the Liberty Ships. I gather there was no interest on the Left Coast to restore one
as has been done on the East Coast with the John W. Brown out of Baltimore on which crusies are offered or
even just tours such as on the DDE USS Slater in Albany, NY or the USS Kidd in Baton Rouge, LA. IIRC there
is also a WW II flat top in NYC.
 
Cordially, Don Valentine
 


tbarney2004
 

That would be the USS Intrepid at what would have been, I believe, Pier 86 @ W. 46th Street which is a few blocks south of the Manhattan Cruise terminal (today) which happens to sit on the Hudson River, which is incorrectly named being that it is a tidal estuary, as the tidal flow extends up to and past Albany 100 miles north.

Tim Barney - sitting about 1/4 mile from the old, long gone, O&W Kingston Branch and the Ellenville Station/Freight Depot (for some steam era content)

On 4/10/2020 7:13 PM, Donald B. Valentine via groups.io wrote:
     What a shame to cut up the Liberty Ships. I gather there was no interest on the Left Coast to restore one 
as has been done on the East Coast with the John W. Brown out of Baltimore on which crusies are offered or 
even just tours such as on the DDE USS Slater in Albany, NY or the USS Kidd in Baton Rouge, LA. IIRC there
is also a WW II flat top in NYC.

Cordially, Don Valentine