Question re: Lidgerwoods


Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Hi Tony, 

     Jeez Tony, I thought that's what the made wheel lathes for! I'd like to see a photo of that. Thanks for
offering one.

      Not sure when it was retired but know where to check. The Rutland had one at least up into the 
early into the early 1940's and rented it to the St.J. & L.C. from time to time as well. I'd agree that it
must have been really tough on the ballast cars especially when any curvature of the track occurred,
which we know it did quite often. The photos I have are evidence of that as well. Still neat equipment
to my mind, however. Steam operated and mechanical. What could be better??

My best, Don Valentine


Tony Thompson
 

Don Valentine wrote:

     Jeez Tony, I thought that's what the made wheel lathes for! I'd like to see a photo of that. 

   Of course, but you no doubt realize that pulling the drivers off a steam locomotive to take them to the lathe might be more trouble that the Lidgerwood method, which is carried on without disassembling the running gear. Photo below, taken in 1949 at West Oakland. You can see the cable heading off to the left that pulls the locomotive (Arnold Menke collection). For those interested, the flat car is an old F-50-2. 

Tony Thompson



Hudson Leighton
 

A little OT, Lidgerwood is still in business, they make car pullers and ship winches.

-Hudson


Hudson Leighton
 

It's a poor copy but you will get the idea.


Lloyd Keyser
 

There is an excellent  full page article on the C&NW Lidgerwood car pulling a ten wheeler backwards at the 40th Street shops in Chicago. The brake shoes are replaced with cutters to reshape the tire back into the proper contour without  having to use a drop pit. The article has two pictures and drawings of the cutters. I cannot scan so it is on page 42 of Volume II C&NW in Color by Lloyd Keyser published by Morning Sun. 

On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 7:48 PM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:
Don Valentine wrote:

     Jeez Tony, I thought that's what the made wheel lathes for! I'd like to see a photo of that. 

   Of course, but you no doubt realize that pulling the drivers off a steam locomotive to take them to the lathe might be more trouble that the Lidgerwood method, which is carried on without disassembling the running gear. Photo below, taken in 1949 at West Oakland. You can see the cable heading off to the left that pulls the locomotive (Arnold Menke collection). For those interested, the flat car is an old F-50-2. 

Tony Thompson



mofwcaboose <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

I guess I should step in here and mention the issue #7 of my newsletter WORK EXTRA is all about the Lidgerwood Rapid Unloader, including all the photos I have of them and plans. Those interested in purchasing a copy can contact me at the above e-mail address.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Lloyd Keyser <lloydkeyser@...>
To: main <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Apr 13, 2020 10:09 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Question re: Lidgerwoods

There is an excellent  full page article on the C&NW Lidgerwood car pulling a ten wheeler backwards at the 40th Street shops in Chicago. The brake shoes are replaced with cutters to reshape the tire back into the proper contour without  having to use a drop pit. The article has two pictures and drawings of the cutters. I cannot scan so it is on page 42 of Volume II C&NW in Color by Lloyd Keyser published by Morning Sun. 

On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 7:48 PM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:
Don Valentine wrote:


Chuck Soule
 

I am aware that the Northern Pacific had a Lidgerwood at their Auburn, WA engine facility, but I am not sure I could find a picture of it in our current lockdown situation.

Chuck Soule


Richard Wilkens
 

SP&S had two Lidgerwood's, L-1 and L-2 that were put in service in 1910. The machinery for L-1 was purchased from Northern Pacific in 1908 and the car was assembled by the SP&S from parts from wrecked Dirt Car No. 1071 which was destroyed at Vancouver in August 1910. Its not clear if the machinery for L-2 was purchased used or new, it was mounted on Columbia River & Northern Flat Car No. 331. Both Lidgerwood's were retired in 1938 on AFE 6383.

Rich Wilkens
Archivist, SP&S Railway Historical Society


William Canelos
 

Pacific Great Eastern had two of these machines.  They did not use them for truing loco wheels.  They were used by the wrecking crew to do wreck recovery.  There is an amazing book called "In the Ditch" by Eric Stathers  who worked on the wreck trains on the PGE and the recoveries they made using them show incredible knowledge of weights & balances as well as leverage.  PGE did not have a "big hook" only a 7000 pound crane. The Lidgerwoods along with that tiny crane saved their bacon time after time, A great read.

Definitely worth the read.  I got in on Amazon Kindle as an Ebook. 

Bill


greg kennelly
 

The late Bill Hewlett was an avid modeller of the Pacific Great Eastern and a prolific photographer.  In the mid-1960s he became the first member of the Pacific Northwest Region of the NMRA to earn the Master Model Railroader designation (#18).  His collection of PGE photographs is the property of the 7th Division, PNR, NMRA (Canada) and the current Superintendent, John Martin, has given me permission to post the attached photo of Bill's, showing PGE X-152, a Lidgerwood skidder.  The photo was taken on Canada Day, July 1, 1958 at Squamish, BC.  If anyone would like a larger copy of this, contact me off-list please.  Hope the image comes through.

Cheers,
Greg Kennelly



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