Topics

boxcars can be lined up on two tracks


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
At some industries, boxcars can be lined up on two tracks such that the far car is accessed by walking thru the near car and then across a steel plate serving as a bridge to get to the far car.
 
This can be seen nicely in he image below...
 
 
More information can be found at the link below...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


 

Los Angles Produce Terminal arrangement, but their 12 tracks were at an angle. Reefers could be unloaded 3 at a time using bridge plates between far 2. There was always one against a dock, 36 cars could be unloaded at the same time.
Andy Jackson
Santa Fe Springs CA


Richard McQuade
 

I spent 2 summers in the big CPR freight sheds in Lambton Yard in Toronto. The bridge plates were used on a lot of the cars. The shed was long and cars were always beside each other on adjacent tracks because some destinations like Montreal Pool and Montreal Eaton's would load 2 or more cars with the outside car loaded first then the inside car because there was a lot of freight going there every day without exception. I seem to recall that they were at the west end of the shed where the switch lead was because it made more sense to have them at that end then to have them buried up against the track bumpers at the far (east) end of the freight shed. There were two shifts - "graveyard" (1130pm-8am) and day shift (8am-4:30pm). All cars had to be closed at the end of the day shift so that they could be shunted between 4:30-11:30pm. Some cars wouldn't be fully loaded but had to have bulkheads nailed inside to keep the load from shifting while the yard crew banged them around. If a car was loaded it was sealed at the end of the shift but semi-loaded cars just had their doors closed and latched. On a model railroad a large freight shed could keep a crew busy for a whole shift because loaded cars needed to be switched out and replaced with empty cars and  semi-loaded cars had to be moved then brought back to their proper loading docks. That meant that not all cars on the inside track (closest to the shed) would be dragged out and sent away but that some would be and replaced with empties and some wouldn't be. Inbound freight to Toronto went to the King St. freight shed downtown. After those cars were unloaded and yarded they were sent up to us to be loaded. We didn't unload boxcars at Lambton, only loaded them from trucks that brought the freight to the shed.
Richard


Andy Miller
 

There is an interesting feature about this.  Unlike box cars which had sliding doors, Reefers had double leaf swing doors needed to seal the car air tight.  That is why the doors were only 4’ wide. (well the SFRD were 5’) Any wider and they could not be loaded or unloaded on parallel tracks.   One of the great developments of WWII was the forklift truck.  It soon became the preferred way to unload box cars, but most forklifts would not fit though a 4’ door!   That’s why plug doors rapidly became standard on reefers after the war.

 

For the longest time no one made a 40’ plug door, iced reefer in HO.  So I kitbashed  them.  After I did about a dozen, Accurail came out with theirs – the story of my model RRing life.

 

Regards,

 

Andy Miller

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Andy Jackson
Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2020 8:03 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] boxcars can be lined up on two tracks

 

Los Angles Produce Terminal arrangement, but their 12 tracks were at an angle. Reefers could be unloaded 3 at a time using bridge plates between far 2. There was always one against a dock, 36 cars could be unloaded at the same time.

Andy Jackson

Santa Fe Springs CA


Steve SANDIFER
 

Standard procedure at freight houses.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2020 6:05 PM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] boxcars can be lined up on two tracks

 

Hi List Members,

 

At some industries, boxcars can be lined up on two tracks such that the far car is accessed by walking thru the near car and then across a steel plate serving as a bridge to get to the far car.

 

This can be seen nicely in he image below...

 

 

More information can be found at the link below...

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund


Richard McQuade
 

What a great shot! Thanks, James. It is interesting to see how the cars are spread out. Looks like not all might be 40' cars. The shed where I worked was built after WW2 so all of our cars were coupled together in a continuous string and were over 99% CPR cars - all 40' steel cars.
The other interesting item about this is the roofing material used on the freight shed. This is the second shot I've seen of a large shed with tarpaper roofing. Photos in the Vancouver BC public library collection show the same material being used on the main CPR Vancouver freight shed in 1915.
Richard


Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

   What makes you think the freight shed roof was tar paper covered? A heavier paper with granulated slate 
just like architect shingles have is available in roll form as well in the same width as a roll of tar paper and 
would make a lot more sense where something more than temporary covering was needed.

My best, Don Valentine


Richard McQuade
 

Thanks. Just that it looks like it. I didn't know about the material you've mentioned.
Richard


Brian Termunde
 

Interesting the spacing between cars, I would have thought that they would have remained coupled.

Great photo BTW, thanks for sharing it.

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah


Re: boxcars can be lined up on two tracks
From: James SANDIFER
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2020 19:33:50 PDT
Standard procedure at freight houses.
 
 
J. Stephen Sandifer
 
 Attachments:


Scott
 

Do you know the date of that photo James?

Scott McDonald 


 

Most flat roofs of that era and later in the Midwest are "tar paper".  More accurately; roofing felts tarred over in several layers.  I have crawled over many and on hot days, had the gooey tar on as many pairs of shoes.  The felts do not have a granulated top coat, just goo.

Mike Aufderheide
Architect, shoe cleaner.


Steve SANDIFER
 

The photo is entitled: GalewoodIL MilwaukeeRd 1943. I think it is from the US Government collection.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Scott
Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2020 9:44 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] boxcars can be lined up on two tracks

 

Do you know the date of that photo James?

Scott McDonald 


Jack McGarry
 

John,
I have not yet had any calls on the model.  Not unusual for the higher end models given the current situation.
Stay safe.
Jack

Jack McGarry

Allegheny Scale Models
470 Schooley's Mountain Road
Suite 117
Hackettstown, New Jersey. 07840

www.alleghenyscale.com
oscale@...

Business - 908-684-2070
Mobile - 908-436-7581


On Apr 25, 2020, at 3:07 PM, James SANDIFER <steve.sandifer@...> wrote:



The photo is entitled: GalewoodIL MilwaukeeRd 1943. I think it is from the US Government collection.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Scott
Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2020 9:44 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] boxcars can be lined up on two tracks

 

Do you know the date of that photo James?

Scott McDonald 


Dennis Storzek
 

On Sat, Apr 25, 2020 at 10:39 AM, Michael Aufderheide wrote:
Most flat roofs of that era and later in the Midwest are "tar paper".  More accurately; roofing felts tarred over in several layers.  I have crawled over many and on hot days, had the gooey tar on as many pairs of shoes.  The felts do not have a granulated top coat, just goo.
Often called a "mopped roof" because the hot tar (or asphalt) is applied with a mop. That's what the near end closest to the camera looks like. However, further away, each 3' x 33' strip is a slightly different color. I suspect they had a roof leak and sent somebody up there to patch it with a few rolls of 'roll roofing' which is the proper name for the rolls with the granuals on it.

Dennis Storzek


Ted Schnepf
 

Hello All,

Galewood was a majorLCL freight house on the Milwaukee Rd, in the city of Chicago. There were actually two freight houses with 5 tracks between them and then to the north another three loading tracks. Each house was about 2000 ft long. About 400 cars at max capacity. Knew a trainmaster and he told me each day starting at 5PM, two crews switched the houses for the next 12 hours. there were span plates across all five tracks. There are also photos showing reefers being loaded with LCL at this house.

Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120


On Apr 25, 2020, at 3:07 PM, James SANDIFER <steve.sandifer@...> wrote:


The photo is entitled: GalewoodIL MilwaukeeRd 1943. I think it is from the US Government collection.

J. Stephen Sandifer

 


Schuyler Larrabee
 

As someone else mentioned in a now-deleted-from-my-computer email, not all tar paper roofs had granules.  “Tar Paper” was simply a roofing felt which was impregnated with tar, and innocent of granules.  Sometimes hard to unroll because the tar had softened and very effectively stuck together the layers of the roll, generally, they were laid down in two layers, set in hot mopped roofing tar (the kind that stinks) directly on the roof, then a second layer offset from the first laterally, also laid in hot mopped tar.  One “feature” of this was, when laid directly on a wood roof, was that when the roof got hot enough (black roof in direct sun, you bet it got hot!) that first application of tar could soften enough to drip through any open joints, gaps or knots in the planks.  Made a hell of a mess in the spaces or floors below.  The men that laid these roofs were typically pretty slender and lean, because all that heat sweated all their moisture out of them!

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2020 4:18 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] boxcars can be lined up on two tracks

 

On Sat, Apr 25, 2020 at 10:39 AM, Michael Aufderheide wrote:

Most flat roofs of that era and later in the Midwest are "tar paper".  More accurately; roofing felts tarred over in several layers.  I have crawled over many and on hot days, had the gooey tar on as many pairs of shoes.  The felts do not have a granulated top coat, just goo.

Often called a "mopped roof" because the hot tar (or asphalt) is applied with a mop. That's what the near end closest to the camera looks like. However, further away, each 3' x 33' strip is a slightly different color. I suspect they had a roof leak and sent somebody up there to patch it with a few rolls of 'roll roofing' which is the proper name for the rolls with the granuals on it.

Dennis Storzek


Bob Chaparro
 

How about this example?

Oregon Short Line Freight House

A 1912 photo from the University of Utah Library:

https://collections.lib.utah.edu/details?id=527642&page=15&facet_format_t=%22image%2Fjpeg%22&q=warehouse

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


gary laakso
 

Bob, the end cars on the two tracks closest to the freight house appear to be refrigerator cars while the 5th car over is a Great Northern truss rod boxcar with its end door showing.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 2, 2020 10:56 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] boxcars can be lined up on two tracks

 

How about this example?

Oregon Short Line Freight House

A 1912 photo from the University of Utah Library:

https://collections.lib.utah.edu/details?id=527642&page=15&facet_format_t=%22image%2Fjpeg%22&q=warehouse

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

 The car to the right appears to be a Erie car with an end door. I'll leave the rest to
tjose with better computer ability than I possess.

My best, Don Valentine